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Building Plans in Witham

 

Building Plans

The web site http://www.buildinghistory.org/regulations.shtml gives a history of building regulations dating from 1189 ! For a long time they were mostly operative in particular cities. But in the mid-19th century, legislation made them more widespread. In particular, Boards of Health were established in 1848. The earliest surviving Witham building plans date from 1855, so probably arise from legislation passed in connection with the Boards. The Witham Board of Health dealt with them until the work was taken over by their successors, the Witham Urban District Council, in 1894.

The first 275 plans are stuck into a large book, and date from 1855 until 1914 ERO D/UWi/Pb1. The last one in the book is of W H Smith’s bookstall and teahouse at the Rifle Ranges near the end of Powershall End; unfortunately we are not told its exact location.

After 1914, the plans survive individually, with their numbers carrying on from the ones in the book, and with the reference ERO Acc A7280 (5B51D/3) My notes are continuous up to plan 323 in 1921 but after that, they are selective.

Obviously the most interesting things are the plans themselves, which need to be seen at the ERO. I was not able to photograph any, because of the regulations then. But it may well be permitted to do so now. Usually the only other information is the occasional comment in the Board or Council minutes, also in the ERO.

There are three different types of plan. The ones which are literally plans, drawn horizontally of the floors and grounds. There are elevations, giving vertical views of the outside of the building. And there are sections, giving vertical views through the building. Some applications have all three types, others only one.

In the notes and tables below, I have tried to straighten out the information which tends to be scattered about the plans. And also to add the present location and/or address of the property in question, from my own deductions. I hope this information will be as useful to others as it has been to me. Street numbers were not introduced in Witham until about 1920, and the occupants often took some time after that before they troubled to use them. So to identify the buildings can sometimes be difficult.

No Description

[my additions are in square brackets]

Address given People:

O=owner, A= architect, B=builder

Year of con-sent Probable address today

 

1 Three cottages near Cocks Farm (tce) Chipping Hill R Blackett (O) 1855 65-69 Braintree Road
2 Alterations to house

[large side extension; altered a bit since]

Chipping Hill G Coote (O) 1856 10 Chipping Hill
3 Residence Mill House, Chipping Hill (actually Powershall End) S Chopping (O) 1857 1 Powershall End
4 Alterations to Chapel Baptist Chapel, Maldon Road Trustees of Baptist Church (O) 1857 Chapel House, Maldon Road
5 Addition to cottages Chase near Maldon Road Thomas Tomkin, MD (O) 1857 3-5 Maldon Road ?
6 Four cottages (2 s-d) Near Mill Field Miss Ann Crump (O) 1858 2-8 Guithavon Valley
7 Additions to house Spa Place, Chipping Hill George Edwards (O) 1858 Spa Place, 58 Powershall End
7 A Drains Guithavon Street and Mill Lane 1855 Guithavon Street and Mill Lane
8 Four cottages (tce) Chipping Hill (‘Scrivener Terrace, Chalks Lane’ added later instead) John Chalk, Chipping Hill (O) 1858 57-63 Braintree Road
9 Cottage Powers Hall End, Chipping Hill Mr Bretnall (O) 1858 7? Powershall End
10 Eight houses (tce?) Guithavon Street, opposite the Church Mrs Elizabeth Hart (O) 1860 21-35 Guithavon Street
11 Alms Houses Church Street, Chipping Hill 1860 50-52 Church Street
11 A Three cottages (tce) Church Street, Chipping Hill William Hutley (O) 1860 33-37 Church Street
12 House Guithavon Street George and John Beard (O) 1860 Crown, Guithavon Street
13 Alteration of Almshouse fence Church Street, Chipping Hill 1860 50-52 Church Street
14 Alterations House occupied by Mr Tiffen, Newland Street H L White (O) 1860 ? Newland Street
15 Slaughterhouse

 

[added later]

Guithavon Street H Barwell (O) [added later] 1861 Guithavon Street
16 Two cottages (s-d) Mill Lane, between Crown beer house and cottages belonging to Mr Hanna G & J Beard (G Beard junior, Coggeshall) (O? and B) 1861 ?? Mill Lane
17 Two houses

 

[50 now much extended]

Maldon Road Mr Partridge (O) 1861 50-52 Maldon Road
18 House Guithavon Valley House, near Witham Mill J Quinney (O) 1861 Valley House (formerly Row Cottage), Mill Lane
18 A Cottage Witham Wharf James Beadel (O) 1862 ?
19 Villa Maldon Road (‘Freelands’ added later) Mr Page, Southminster (added later) [Page C esq, Old moor, Sminster, in 1862 direc] (O?); Fred Chancellor, 10 Pinners Hall, Old Broad Street, Chelmsford (A); J Coote (B) (also a loose letter which was filed at 81 when I looked, from Fred Chancellor) 1862 Freeland House, 20 Maldon Road
20 Mason’s house (two houses) Easton Road (added later) Mr Beadel (O) 1862 1-2 Easton Road
21 Revised Plan of boundary walls for new villa Maldon Road Mr Page (O) 1862 Freeland House, 20 Maldon Road
22 House

 

[alteration to 18?]

Corner Mill Field and Mill Road (‘Guithavon Valley’ added later) Mr Davey (O) 1863 Valley House (formerly Row Cottage), Mill Lane
23 Chapel

 

[nice elevation]

Guithavon Street Wesleyan Connexion (O); Charles Pertwee, Chelmsford (A) 1863 Methodist Hall, Guithavon Street
24 House Near Captain Luard’s (‘Greentree Café, Hatfield Road’ added later) Mr Joslin (O) 1863 Jack and Jenny, Hatfield Road?
25 House For Lawn Mr Wright (O) 1865 Lawn Cottage, 94 Newland Street
26 House for Mistresses

 

[Since demolished]

National School, Guithavon Street National School (O) 1865 National Schools, Guithavon Street
27 Six almshouses (tce)

 

[known as Paradise Row, since demolished]

 

 

Guithavon Street 1867 Site of Methodist chapel, Guithavon Street
27 A Dwelling Guithavon Street Mrs Hart (O) 1868 37 Guithavon Street?
28 Two cottages (s-d) Blue Mills Messrs B & R W Dixon (O) 1869? Blue Mills Hill?
29 Two cottages (s-d) Eagle Yard Messrs J. Savill, Witham (O) 1869 Eagle Yard, Maldon Road
30 Five cottages (tce) Faragon Terrace, Bridge Street Mrs Thomasin (O) 1869 or 1870? Faragon Terrace, 59-67 Bridge Street
30 A Alterations

 

[since demolished]

Fellmongers, Mill Lane Messrs W & T Johns (O); Charles Pertwee (A) 1869 Former tannery, Mill Lane
31 Two cottages (s-d) Chalks Road (added later)
32 Four cottages (tce) Chalks Road (added later)
No plans 1871-82, except see 40-44
33 Villas (tce) Medina Villas, Newland Street
34 Four cottages (tce) Temples Estate, lots 24 and 25 (‘Braintree Road’ added later)
35 Missing or number not used
36 Five cottages (tce)

 

[since demolished]

Freebornes farm (‘Chess Lane’ added later)
37 Two cottages )(s-d)

 

[Prob. 2 pairs blt. 27-29 have 1883 on. [NB no plans found for 31-33 which are different, with doors in front; they have 1887 on)]

27 and 29 Braintree Road (added later)
38 Two houses (s-d) 10 and 12 Albert Road (added later; should be 10-11)
38 A House
39 Shop and residence Chipping Hill (’10 Chipping Hill’ added later; should be 10 Braintree Road)
40 Two labourers cottages (s-d)
41 House

 

[nice elevation]

Avenue Road (added later, should be Chipping Hill)
42 Four cottages (2 s-d)

 

[passage in middle, blt over at 1st floor]

Braintree Road (added later)
43 Workshops and boiler house Chipping Hill (added later) Joseph Smith (O and B) 1880s? Chipping Hill Industrial estate, behind 1a Braintree Road
44 Two cottages (s-d) Braintree Road — (Consent signed E Chalk for Mr Jones?) 1880s? 6-8 Braintree Road, Harwin Cottages
44 A Two villas

 

[don’t think I saw this]

1 and 2 Avenue Road [?] (probably renumbered since) F Speakman (O); C Pertwee (A) 1884 62-64 Avenue Road
45 Pair of cottages (s-d)

 

[probably not built. Not 1897 O.S. and different style now]

Chipping Hill (‘5 and 7 Braintree Road’ added later) Joseph Smith (O? & B); C Pertwee, Chelmsford (A) 1886 5-7 Braintree Road
46 Warehouse, shops and cottages (latter s-d)

 

[nice elevations]

Collingwood Road (‘Lockram Villas’ added later) E C Smith (O); C Pertwee, Chelmsford (A) 1887 1-9 Collingwood Road, and Lockram Villas, 7-9 Collingwood Road
47 Four cottages (tce) Albert Road, Chipping Hill Harriet E & Edgar Chalk (O); C Pertwee, Chelmsford (A) 1887? 5-8 Albert Road
48 Seven cottages (tce) Chipping Hill (‘Temple Terrace, Braintree Road’ added later) Joseph Smith (O? & B); Charles Pertwee (A) 1887 35-47 Braintree Road, Temple Terrace
49 House

 

[since demolished]

Chipping Hill (‘8 Chipping Hill’ added later) Joseph Smith (O? & B); F E L Harris, Chelmsford (A) 1889 Temples, 8 Chipping Hill?
50 Seed warehouse.

 

[Nice drawings. Since burnt down]

Grove Road (later Avenue Road) George Taber (O); J C Smith (A) 1894? (this date poss added to plan later) Cooper Taber warehouse, Avenue Road, now site of c.28-32 Avenue Road
51 Four houses (tce) Bridge Street (‘3, 5, 7 and 9 Bridge Street’ added later) E C Sayer (O); Leonard J Veit, 171 Cemetery Road, Ipswich (A) 1891 3-9 Bridge Street
52 Grooms cottage House in Newland Street behind Roslyn House (added later) Miss Mitchell (O); James Gamble (B); R Mawhood, Chelmsford (A) 1891? 14 Newland Street
53 House Chipping Hill (‘3 Avenue Road’ added later; probably renumbered since) Joseph Smith (O? & B); F E L Harris, 85 High Street, Chelmsford (A) 1891 58 Avenue Road
54 House Avenue Terrace Francis Speakman (O); J Clark?, Coggeshall (A) 1892 Holly Villa, 60 Avenue Road
55 House Powershall End Miss Tuff (O) 1892 or 1893? 119 Powershall End
56 Two houses (s-d) Chipping Hill (‘Avenue Road’ added later) Joseph Smith (O? & B); Charles Pertwee, Chelmsford (A) 1892 or 1893? 54-56 Avenue Road
57 Cottage Chipping Hill (‘Braintree Road’ added later) W G Richards (O & B); R Mawhood, Chelmsford (A) 1893 4 Braintree Road
58 Public Hall

 

[drawings nice but faint]

Collingwood Road Edward J Dampier, Colchester, Diocesan Surveyor for St Albans (A) 1894? Public Hall, Collingwood Road
58 A Alteration to drainage 26th Liverpool Regiment and 58th Field Bakery A.S.C., Public Hall DORE, Chelmsford 1918 (loose, out of order) Public Hall, Collingwood Road
59 Two cottages (s-d) 3 and 4 Easton Road (added later) Richard Mawhood, Chelmsford (A) 1894 3-4 Easton Road
60 House 12 Albert Road (added later) W H Bygrave (O); F H Baller, Architect and Surveyor, Colchester and Clacton (A) 1894 12? Albert Road
61 Two cottages (s-d) Chipping Hill (‘Bygrove Cottages, Braintree Road’ and ‘Grosvenor Villas’ added in two different hands) W G Richards (O? & B); R Mawhood, 2 Market Road, Chelmsford (A) 1894 15-17 Braintree Road, Grosvenor Villas
62 Three houses (tce)

 

[six were built]

Station Road (‘Easton Road’ added later) Joseph Smith (O? & B); R Mawhood, Architect, 2 Market Road, Chelmsford (A) 1894 5-10 Easton Road
63 Four pairs of villas (4 s-d)

 

[probably not built]

Grove Road (later Avenue Road) Joseph Smith (O? & B); R Mawhood, architect, Chelmsford (A) 1894 ? Avenue Road
64 Two houses (s-d) Chipping Hill (‘Albert Road’ added later) Robert Moore (O) 1894 or 1895 ? 13-14 Albert Road
65 Four cottages (ter) Church Street Mr Wadley (O) 1895 25-31 Church Street
66 Villa

 

[changed by plan 69]

Grove Road (later Avenue Road) Joseph Smith (O? & B) 1895 38 Avenue Road
67 Sewer for draining houses Station Road [actually Easton Road] Joseph Smith (O) 1895 ? Easton Road (Avenue Road on plan too)
68 Two cottages (s-d).

 

[since demolished]

Maltings Cottages near Goods Station off Avenue Road (added later) Messrs Gray (O); Fred Chance-llor, c/o Finsbury Circus, EC (A) 1896 East side of Station Road, on way to Maltings
69 Alterations to rooms of house (original plan passed 1895)

 

[previous plan 66]

Grove Road (later Avenue Road) Joseph Smith (O? and B); Albert M Clarke (A?) 1896? 38 Avenue Road
70 House 18 Avenue Road (added later; probably renumbered since) William Stevens, Witham (O); Ernest Geldart (A) 1896 Thirroul, c.24 Avenue Road
71 Additions and alterations The George Inn, Collingwood Road T D Ridley & Sons (O); F E L Harris, 75 High Street, Chelmsford (A) 1896 The George, 36 Newland Street
72 Two cottages (s-d) r Road C Lewis (O? and B) 1896? ? Maldon Road
72 A Two cottages (s-d) Providence Cottages, Maldon Road (added later) [no name of Providence cotts] G Robjent (O); R Mawhood, Chelmsford (A) 1896 78-80 Maldon Road
72 B Two cottages (s-d)

 

[Poss not built. Not on 1897 OS, & different style now]

Chipping Hill (Braintree Road on plan) Joseph Smith (O? and B); Albert M Clarke, surveyor, Witham (A?) 1896? 9-11 Braintree Road
73 Two cottages (s-d) Drill Yard, Mill Lane Dr W G Gimson (O); Albert M Clarke (A) 1897 ? Mill Lane
74 Building land

 

[Printed sale catalogue]

Maldon Road Abrey & Gardner (O?) 1896 ? Maldon Road
75 Two villas (s-d) Maldon Road F C Payne (O) 1896? 33-35 Maldon Road
76 Two cottages (s-d) Chipping Hill Mrs J Alliston (O); Walter W Rust (B) 1897 47-49 Chipping Hill
77 Four villas (2 s-d)

 

[Only one pair there; new bung’s to south]

Maldon Road A R Motion (O); H W Richards (B) 1897 62-64 Maldon Road
78 Telephone wire Witham E M Blyth (O); Albert M Clarke, Witham (A) 1897 Old Mill House, Guithavon Valley, to 31 Newland Street
79 Villa Station Road (later Easton Road) [but actually Albert Road] Mrs Robert Moore (O); Albert M Clarke (A) 1897 15 Albert Road
79 A Alterations (new porch?) The Grove P E Laurence, JP (O) 1897? The Grove, Newland Street
80 Six houses Chipping Hill J Smith & Son (O and B); Albert M Clarke, Witham (A) CANCELLED 1897 3-29 Chipping Hill (not built)
81 ‘Small cottage residence’ Brookcote, Chipping Hill J Smith & Sons (O? and B); George Sherrin, 33 Finsbury Circus, E C (A) 1897 Brookcote, 29 Chipping Hill
82 Wash houses Maldon Road Mr?. Hicks (O); James Gamble (B) 1897 ? Maldon Road (poss pt of Trafalgar Sq?)
83 Residence.

 

 

[Since demolished]

Station Road [actually Easton Road] E West (O and B); F Whitmore, Chelmsford (A) 1897 Easton Road, far end, east of terrace
84 Two cottages (s-d) Maldon Road John Camping (O); Albert M Clarke (A) 1897? 82-84 Maldon Road
85 Infirmary (for 24 beds)

 

[since demolished]

South Metropolitan Schools (later Bridge) South Metropolitan Schools (O); F Whitmore, Chelmsford (A) 1897? Hospital wing, Bridge, Hatfield Road
86 Corn market.

 

[Since demolished]

Chipping Hill A E Clear of Maldon (O); P M Beaumont, Maldon (A) 1897? Collingwood Road, by railway bridge
87 Alterations (new retort house?)

 

[since demolished]

Gas Works Witham Gas & Coke Co. Ltd (O) 1897? Gas Works, 134 Newland Street, and Mill Lane
88 Fences [Plan shows ‘bathing place’] Witham Sewage Farm Albert Millar Clarke?, surveyor (A) 1897 Sewage works
88 A Attic rooms Chipping Hill Mrs I Alliston (O); Walter W Rust (B and A) 1897? 47-49 Chipping Hill
89 Two coal sheds 2 and 3 Albert Road W Tyler (B?) 1897? 2-3 Albert Road ?
90 Stable Brookcote (added later), Chipping Hill (on plan) J Smith & Son (O? and B); George Sherrin, 33 Finsbury Circus, EC (A) 1897 Brookcote, 29 Chipping Hill
91 Two villas (s-d) Grove Road (later Avenue Road) Charles Lewis, sanitary engineer, general contractor, High Street, Witham (O?, B and A?) 1897 42-44 Avenue Road
92 Four cottages (ter) Chalks Road John Wadley (O); W G Richards, Chipping Hill, Witham (B); H W Richards (A?) 1897 Diamond Terrace, 11-14 Chalks Road
93 Six cottages (ter) Station Road [actually Easton Road] J Smith & Son (O? and B) 1897 11-16 Easton Road
94 Workshop Collingwood Road Smith & Lock (O and B); W P Perkins (A?) 1897 2 Collingwood Road, now site of Ben Sainty Court
95 House Avenue Road Charles Lewis (O? and B); W P Perkins (A) 1898 40 Avenue Road
96 Storeroom Chipping Hill J Smith & Son (O? and B); W P Perkins (A?) 1898 Chipping Hill Industrial estate, behind 1a Braintree Road
97 Three water closets (tce) Church Street, Chipping Hill Mrs W Rust (O); W W Rust (B and A) 1898? 10 or 12 Church Street ?
98 Alteration of Boundary Fence Avenue Road W P Perkins (A?) 1898 Thirroul, c.24 Avenue Road?
98 A Workshop

 

[Either not built or demolished]

Station Road (actually Avenue Road) Messrs J Smith & Son (O? and B); W P Perkins (A?) 1898? 48 Avenue Road, back of
99 Lodge Avenue Road Percy E. Laurence (O); Charles Lewis (B); George Sherrin, 33 Finsbury Circus, EC (A) 1898 Avenue Lodge, Collingwood Road
100 Additions Blunts Hall Rt Hon Lord Rayleigh (O); James Gamble (B) 1898? Blunts Hall
101 Alterations & Additions Matayns (later Blue Mills) G W Grabham, MD (O); Charles E Butcher, 3 Queen Street, Colchester (A) 1898 Blue Mills
102 Five houses (terrace) Powers Hall End Walter Butler, Guithavon Street (O); W P Perkins (A?) 1898 or 1899? 37-45 Powershall End
103 Alterations Mill E M Blyth (O); W P Perkins (A?) 1899 Old Mill House, Guithavon Valley?
104 House Stradavon, Grove Road (later Avenue Road) H Mortimer (O); Joseph Smith & Son (B) 1899 36 Avenue Road
104A Bay Window Stradavon, Grove Road (later Avenue Road) H Mortimer (O) 1899 36 Avenue Road
105 Cart shed Church Street Fred Hasler (O) 1899? 56 Church Street ?
106 Dressing room and covered promenade The Public Hall, Collingwood Road Witham Public Hall Co Ltd (Wm Stephens, Hon Sec, The Homestead, Witham) (O); W P Perkins (A?) 1899 Public Hall, Collingwood Road
107 House

 

[I thought this was missing when I looked. Also see 118]

Avenue Road A B Lake (O); J Smith & Son (B) 1899? 46 Avenue Road
108 Cloakroom The Public Hall, Collingwood Road The Public Hall Co (O); Charles Lewis (B), George Sherrin, 33 Finsbury Circus (A) 1899 Public Hall, Collingwood Road
109 House Avenue Road Joseph Smith (O? and B) 1899 34 Avenue Road
110 House [since demolished] Earlsmead?, Chipping Hill Road Joseph Smith & Son (O? and B); George Sherrin, 33 Finsbury Circus, EC (A) 1899 Earlsmead?, Chipping Hill
111 House Braintree Road, Chipping Hill J Chapman of Braintree Road (O) 1899 13 Braintree Road
111A Barley Store and Kiln

 

[Nice elevations of old maltings. Since redeveloped]

The Maltings, near Railway Station Messrs Harrison Gray (O); Fred Chancellor (A) 1900 Maltings, Station Road
112 Two houses (s-d)

 

[see also 125]

Avenue Road G Twissell (O?); Joseph Smith (B) 1900? 50-52 Avenue Road
113 Coal, knife and boot store

 

[since demolished]

Temples, Chipping Hill Joseph Smith (O? and B) 1900? Temples, 8 Chipping Hill
114 WC and lavatory Governors House, The Witham Gas Works, Mill Lane The Witham Gas & Coke Company Ltd (Wm Bindon Blood, Chairman) (O) 1901 134 Newland Street, and Mill Lane
115 Two houses (s-d) Braintree Road Claydon & Hellen (O); H W Richards, Chipping Hill (B) 1901 28-30 Braintree Road
116 WC addition

 

[ I saw this as loose papers at the back of the book]

Maldon Road Witham Co-operative Society (O); J Gamble (B) 1901 ? Maldon Road
117 Warehouse, and alterations and additions Co-operative Society, High Street Witham Co-operative Soc (Fredk Bowyer, Secretary) (O); Goodey & Cressall, Colchester (A) 1901 ? Newland Street (Co-op)
118 House.

 

[also see 107]

Avenue Road A B Lake (O); Joseph Smith & Son (B) 1901 or 1902? 46 Avenue Road
119 Drainage plan and additions Bridge School (also a loose specification and a plan in back of volume) Witham? Metropolitan Asylums Board (O); W T Hatch (A) 1901 Bridge, Hatfield Road
120 House Guithavon Street Mary Morrell of Woodham (O) 1902 ? Guithavon Street
121 Warehouse addition to factory.

 

[since burnt down]

Avenue Road Cooper Taber & Co (O); Joseph Smith, Chipping Hill (B) 1902 Cooper Taber warehouse, Avenue Road, now site of c.28-32 Avenue Road
122 Outhouse Newland Street Dr Gimson (O); H W Richards (B and A?) 1902 or 1903? 125 or 127 or 129 ? Newland Street
123 Additions to house Albert Road, Chipping Hill Mrs R Moore (O) 1902 or 1903? 15 Albert Road
124 New bay

 

[since demolished]

Temples, Chipping Hill Joseph Smith and Son, Builders, Contractors and Brick Manufacturers, Steam Joinery Works, Sawing and Planing Mills, Chipping Hill (O? and B) 1903 Temples, 8 Chipping Hill
125 Two houses

 

[see also plan 112]

Avenue Road Joseph Smith (O? and B) ? 50-52 Avenue Road
126 Two cottages (s-d)

 

[Not built. See plan 192]

Braintree Road Joseph Smith, builders (O? and B) 1903 1-3 Braintree Road
127 Lineman’s room Post Office, High Street Joseph Smith and Son (B) 1903 84 Newland Street
128 House

 

 

[Superseded by 177]

Maldon Road W W Brown (O); Joseph W Smith (B) 1903 56 Maldon Road
129 Wash house Albert Road Mrs R Moore (O) 1903? 15 Albert Road
130 Addition Bank House Mrs Peecock (O); Walter W Rust (B and A?) 1901? 61 Newland Street
131 numbers 131-139 not used; after this the plans are separate and not in a volume
140 House and offices.

 

[since demolished]

Collingwood Road W B Blood (O) 1904? 10 Collingwood Road
141 Missing?
142 New shop front

 

[Smith letters Xeroxed]

High Street Mrs Martha Olley (O); Joseph Smith & Son, builders, contractors [et al.], Witham (B) 1904 95 Newland Street
143 Additional seed warehouse.

 

[Since burnt down]

Avenue Road and Station Road Cooper Taber & Co Ltd (H Simpson, director), 90 & 92 Southwark Street, London SE, and Witham (O); W P Perkins, architect and surveyor, Witham (A) 1904 Cooper Taber warehouse, Avenue Road, now site of c.28-32 Avenue Road
144 Three houses

 

[Revision asked for. See also 147]

Bridge Street E M Blyth, Witham (O); Richard Mawhood, Chelmsford (A) 1904 4-8 Bridge Street
145 Drying floor

 

[Can’t see approval. Since burnt down]

Avenue Road and Station Road Cooper Taber & Co Ltd (H Simpson, director), 90 & 92 Southwark Street, London SE, and Witham (O); W P Perkins, architect and surveyor, Witham (A) 1904 Cooper Taber warehouse, Avenue Road, now site of c.28-32 Avenue Road
146 New stores on site of fire, and additions to workshops Chipping Hill Jos Smith & Son, Chipping Hill (O and B) 1904 Chipping Hill Industrial estate, behind 1a Braintree Road
147 Drainage to cow yard

 

[See also 144]

Bridge Street E M Blyth (O); R Mawhood, Chelmsford (A) NOT APPROVED 1904 4-8 Bridge Street
148 House Evegate, Avenue Road [can’t see house name on plan now, 2001 – perhaps on wrapper removed ?] Miss Hobbs (O); Jos Smith, Temples, Witham (B) 1904 48 Avenue Road
149 Two houses Howbridge Hall Road R F Baker, Rivenhall (O) 1904 6-7 [consec] Howbridge Road
150 Workshop and showroom Collingwood Road J E Glover, Collingwood Road, for Glover Bros. 1904 38 Newland Street and 1-3 Collingwood Road
151 Mens WC International Stores, High Street International Stores (O) 1904 43? Newland Street
152 Shed for storing flour, and alteration to elevation of shop front.

 

[Letter Xeroxed]

The Bakery, Witham High Street W Ardley (O); Walter W Rust, builder and contractor (B and A) 1905 137 Newland Street
153 Four cottages

 

[No approval recorded; not built]

Off Newland Street Percy E Laurence esquire(O); P M Beaumont, Maldon (A) 1905 Chess Lane
154 Bathroom Christmas House, High Street Mrs Archer (O); Jos Smith & Son, builders, Witham (B) 1905 98 Newland Street
155 Alterations and additions 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 Grove Cottages, Newland Street Percy E Laurence esq (O); P M Beaumont, Maldon, MSA (A) 1905 1-5 Grove Cottages, Newland Street
156 Coalshed and WC High Street G Gage (O) 1905 48 Newland Street
157 Additions The Rowans, Avenue Road Joseph Smith and Son (O and B) 1905 34 Avenue Road
158 WC Kings Chase, premises late Kings J E Smith (O and B) 1905 105 Newland Street
159 House Collingwood Road Percy E Laurence (O); P M Beaumont, Maldon (A) 1905 18 Collingwood Road (Bygrove house)
160 Lavatories & Kitchen Congregational Chapel, High Street Trustees of Congregational Church (O); Jos Smith & Son, Chipping Hill, builders (B) 1905 88 Newland Street (behind), in yard of URC
161 Extensions to two houses Church Street H W Richards (O and B) 1905 54-56 Church Street
162 Engine House adjoining steam mill Mill Street [i.e. Mill Lane] Edward Mark Blyth (O) 1905 Mill House, Guithavon Valley
163 Storehouse The Temples, Chipping Hill J Smith & Son (O and B) 1905 8 Chipping Hill
164 Closets 3, 4 & 5 Grove Cottages, Newland Street Percy E Laurence esq (O); P M Beaumont, MSA, Maldon (A) 1905 3-5 Grove Cottages, Newland Street
165 Six Houses Guithavon Road (cat says Street in error) J Ernest Smith (O); J Ernest Smith & Son (B) 1905 21-26 Guithavon Road (consec)
166 Four Cottages Albert Road Messrs H & C Richards (O); H W Richards (B) 1905 16-19 Albert Road (consec)
167 Villa Chipping Hill (Chalks Lane on map) John Wadley (O) 1905 Dean House, 21 Chalks Road
168 Addition to House Powers Hall End Walter Hammond, 12 Bruce St, Bromley by Bow, London E (O) 1906 88 Powershall End
169 Six Cottages Guithavon Road (cat says Street in error) J Ernest Smith (O); J Ernest Smith & Son (B) 1906 15-20 Guithavon Road (consec)
170 Additions to Cottage

 

[Since demolished and new houses built]

Powers Hall End Alfred Partner, Witham (O) 1906 76-78 Powershall End approx
171 House Collingwood Road Miss S K Chaplin, Witham (O)
172 Alterations to Almshouses Church Street, Chipping Hill H W Richards (B)
173 House and ‘fat boiling shed

 

[‘Not carried out’ written over plan. See 178′]

Guithavon Road / Blunts Hall Road J Ernest Smith (O); J E Smith and Son (B)
174 New Classrooms White Hall College Joseph Smith & Son (B)
175 Shed & Store Newland Street Richard Ortlewell of Messrs Ortlewell & Son Ltd (O)
176 Missing
177 Three Cottages

 

[Plan for 56 supersedes 128]

Maldon Road J Smith (O and B)
178 Three Houses Guithavon Road J Ernest Smith (O and B)
179 Addition to House Holly Villa, Avenue Road F Speakman, Holly Villa (O)
180 Two Houses (s-d) Collingwood Road H W Richards (O and B)
181 Two Houses Collingwood Road J Afford Esq (O); Jos Smith & Son, builders, Witham (B)
182 Alterations to Boiler House and WCs The Works, Chipping Hill Joseph Smith & Son, builder, Chipping Hill (O and B)
182A Two Pairs of Cottages

 

[?Whether built. Look similar but newer]

Braintree Road Witham Co-operative Society Ltd (O)
183 Two Villas (s-d) Maldon Road J E Smith (O); J Smith & Son (B)
184 Additional two bedrooms Row Cottage, Mill Lane Leonard Bentall of Church House, Maldon (O); V C Payne of Maldon (A)
185 Two Cottages

 

[Demolished in 2001]

Cut Throat Lane G E R Witham (O); J E Smith & Son, Witham (B)
186 Office [refused] Lockram Lane H Page (O); H W Richards (B)
187 Office

 

[Plan poss has roads reversed]

Collingwood Road H Page (O); H W Richards (B)
188 Villa Collingwood Road Mr Lass (O); H W Richards for M Richards and Son (B)
189 Two Houses

 

[Not built. Site cut off by Albert Road]

Braintree Road S Letheren (O)
190 Seed Warehouse

 

[Nice elevations and plans]

White Horse Lane Thomas Cullen, Witham (O)
191 House The Bungalow, Collingwood Road Fred Hayward (O); Jos Smith & Son, Witham (B)
192 House

 

[Letter with Smith’s letter head Xeroxed]

Braintree Road Mrs Page (O); J Smith & Son (B)
193 Garden shed High Street Mr Gibbs (O); J Smith & Son (B)
194 Rebuilding of Workshop recently destroyed by fire High Street A R Brown, coachbuilder (occupant), J Ernest Smith, Chipping Hill (O? and B)
195 New trap house and rebuilding of stable

[check manor]

Rear of High Street Messrs Goodchild Bros (O); John T Lever, surveyor, Witham (A)
196 Coal Store & Cart shed Newland street Witham Co-operative Society Ltd (Frederick Bowyer) (O)
197 Wash house & Coals

 

[just small bit at rear]

Braintree Road Mrs. Page (O); J Smith & Son (B)
198 Alterations of house Cambridge villa, London Road Herbert E Fellows, Bocking (A)
199 Four cottages Albert Road Witham Co-operative Society Ltd (O)
200 House Collingwood Road W P Perkins, Collingwood Road (O and A?)
201 Cottage

 

[Poss supers. by 243 qv. 2 also looks similar but has an extra bay on right]

Avenue Road J Smith & Son (O and B) 1909 8 Avenue Road ?
202 Four cottages Albert Road Messrs Richards (O), H W Richards (B) 1909 20-23 Albert Road (consec)
203 Two houses (s-d) Collingwood Road H W Richards (O and B) 1909 45-47 Collingwood Road
204 Motor garage Newland Street J E Smith (O); J Smith & Son (B 1909
205 Extension Railway Cottage, Highfields Road C W Hodges (O); H W Richards (B) 1909 20 Highfields Road
206 House Solheim, Collingwood Road Wm G Naylor, Braintree Road (O and B?) 1909 37 Collingwood Road
207 Park Cottage Maldon Road P E Laurence (O); J T Lever (A) 1909 54 Maldon Road
208 Alterations & Additions

 

[nice plan]

Barclays Bank, High Street Messrs. Barclays Bank (O); Chancellor & Son, architects, 20 Finsbury Circus EC, and Chelmsford (A) Not to be produced without permission of County Archivist 1909 61 Newland Street
209 Four cottages Albert Road Witham Co-operative Society Ltd (O) 1909 24-27 Albert Road (consec)
210 Church House Collingwood Road Fred Chancellor & Son, 20 Finsbury Circus, EC, and Chelmsford, Essex (A) 1909 Church House, Collingwood Road
211 Stable & Cart Shed Newland Place J Smith & Son (O and B) 1909 Newland Place, behind 83-89 Newland Street
212 Workshop Newland Street J E Smith (O); Jos Smith & Son (B) 1909 97 Newland Street
213 Garage The Grove P E Laurence esq, J P, the Grove (O); J T Lever (A) 1909 The Grove, 1 Newland Street
214 House Albert Road Witham Co-operative Society Ltd (Frederick Bowyer, secretary) (O) 1910 32 Albert Road
215 Drains [since demolished] The Tan Yard, Mill Lane Messrs. Rowland Stagg Ltd, Tonbridge (O) 1910 Tan yard, Mill Lane
216 Constitutional Club Collingwood Road J Holdsworth, MSIA, Council Offices, Witham (A?) 1910? Constitutional Club, 14 Collingwood Road
217 Garage Blunts Hall The Hon C Hedley Strutt (O); H W Richards (B) 1910 Blunts Hall, Blunts Hall Road
218 House Collingwood Road William Heddle Esquire (O); F. Hutton & Son, builders and contractors, Birch, Colchester (B and A) 1910 48 Collingwood Road
219 New bank and house.

 

[nice plan]

High Street The Capital & Counties Bank Ltd , Witham (O); John P Briggs FRIBA Effingham House, Arundel Street, Strand (A) Not to be produced without permission of County Archivist 1910 99 Newland Street
220 Alterations and additions to house

 

[Nice plans of house and grounds.]

Ivy Chimneys Lady Luard (O); Wykeham Chancellor, Chelmsford (A) 1910 Ivy Chimneys, Hatfield Road
221 Three cottages Powers Hall End J H F Foster, Great Baddow (O); Johnson & Hawkes, New Street, Chelmsford (B); D Smith Son & Oakley, Charles St, SW (surveyors) 1910 66-70 Powershall End
222 Blacksmiths shop

 

[Plan of yard and cottages etc]

Fleuty’s yard, Bridge Street Beckwith & Gentry, Hatfield and Braintree (on applic), Witham (on plan) (B?) 1910 Corner of Bridge Street and Howbridge Road (now RAFA club)
223 Alterations and additions, new office, showroom, committee room Witham Co-operative Society, High Street Witham Co-operative Society Ltd (O) Goodey and Cressall, architects, Colchester (A) 1911 115 Newland Street
224 Addition to house

 

[In 2000 this extension was replaced by a two-storey one]

Braintree Road Miss Perry (O); J Smith & Son (B and A) 1911 44 Braintree Road
225 House Brampton Hut, Guithavon Valley Bernard C Afford (O); Joseph Smith & Son (B and A) 1911 5 Guithavon Valley
226 WC Woodham, Guithavon Street Miss Morrell (O); W W Rust (B) 1911 Woodhams, 16 Guithavon Street
227 Additions to Collingwood House

 

[Nice plans with nursery etc]

Collingwood Road Mrs. A P Brown (O); H W Mann (A) 1911 15 Collingwood Road
228 Omitted

 

[not seen]

Office 1911
229 Re-erect an office in the yard Mill Road [actually Guithavon Valley] Edward Mark Blyth, Mill House (O) 1911 Old Mill House, Guithavon Valley
230 Four cottages Guithavon Road Joseph Smith & Son (O and B) 1911 7-10 Guithavon Road (consec)
231 Addition to shop Church Street, Chipping Hill F Hasler (O); H W Richards (B) 1911 54 A Church Street
232 Engine and storage sheds Witham Lodge E Pelly esq, Twyford House, Bishops Stortford (O); Morley & Foster, Buckhurst Hill (A) 1911 Witham Lodge, Hatfield Road
233 Lean-to shed The Glove Factory, Albert Road (plan calls it Station Road) National Glove Company (W Pinkham) (O) NOT APPROVED 1911 13 Albert Road (second glove factory)
234 Laundry Rear of Ivy Chimneys cottages E Pelly Esq (O); H W Richards (B) 1911 Ivy Chimneys cottages, behind Ivy Chimneys, Hatfield Road
235 Alterations to sculleries and back additions to cottages Guithavon Road J Smith & Son (O and B) 1911 7-10 Guithavon Road (consec)
236 Cart shed Newland street Witham Co-operative Society Ltd (O) 1911 113-115 Newland Street and Kings Chase
237 Two houses (s-d) Collingwood Road Messrs Richards (O); H W Richards (B) 1911 41-43 Collingwood Road
238 Shed and urinal at Post Office High Street Joseph Smith (B) 1911 84 Newland Street
239 Office

 

[Refs to ‘Witham Market Syndicate’ and ‘Market room’]

Market Road Hugh Page (O); H W Richards, Witham (B) 1911 71 Collingwood Road, (next to bridge)
240 Motor house Collingwood Road Lewis B Cooper, Verbena House, Witham (O) 1911 27 Collingwood Road?
241 Additions to house

 

[very small]

Woodham, Guithavon Street Miss Morrell (O); Walter W Rust (B) 1911 Woodhams, 16 Guithavon Street
242 Office

 

[Layout of forge, paint shop etc (C and N were motor engineers)]

Newland Street Messrs Cullen & Nicholls, Witham (O); Joseph Smith and Son, Witham (B) 1911 97 Newland Street
243 House

 

[2 also looks similar but has an extra bay on right]

Avenue Road Mrs W Gepp (O); Jos Smith & Son (B) 1911 8 Avenue Road ?
244 Additional WCs. White Hall College Vincent Dimmer (O); Joseph Smith & Son (B) 1911 Whitehall, 18 Newland Street
245 Garage [commercial]

 

[Good elevation and shows old house on left]

High Street Mr J Glover (O); Henry W Mann, High Street, Witham, architect and surveyor (A) 1911 155-157 Newland Street
246 Temporary office Braintree Road G Lake (O); J Smith & Son (B) 1911 1A Braintree Road
247 Oven, bake office and stable

 

[Nice plan of bake house etc]

High Street Misses Shoobridge (O); A H Shoobridge, Braintree, Essex (A or B) 1912 29 Newland Street
248 Cloakroom White Hall College Vincent Dimmer (O) 1912 Whitehall, 18 Newland Street
249 Additions to house Chipping Hill T Cullen (O); H W Mann (A) 1912 16 Chipping Hill
250 A Glove Factory

 

[since demolished]

Chipping Hill William Pinkham (O); Joseph Smith & Son, Witham (B) 1912 1 Chipping Hill
251 Conversion into two cottages

 

[since demolished]

The late Bell Inn, Maldon Road The Chelmsford Brewery Co Ltd (O); Charles & N? H Pertwee, Chelmsford (A) NOT APPROVED 1912 37-39 Maldon Road
252 Four Cottages Guithavon Road J E Smith (O); Joseph Smith & Son (B) 1912 7-10 Guithavon Road
253 House Highfields Road W Stevens (O) 1912 116 Highfields Road
254 Two Cottages

 

[not built? (7-10 is a block of 4)]

Guithavon Road Jos Smith & Son (B) 1912 ?? add to 7-10 Guithavon Road
255 Four Houses

 

[Not built; 2 pairs there]

Braintree Road Witham The Witham Co-operative Society (4 plans) 1912 32-38 Braintree Road
256 Alterations

 

[Police Station since demolished]

Police Station, Guithavon Street Frank Whitmore, County Architect, Chelmsford (A) 1912 Site of Mill Vale Lodge, Guithavon Street
257 Slaughter house & pens

 

[since demolished]

Newland Street M and/or R Sorrell (O) 1912 143 Newland Street
258 WCs Church Street, Chipping Hill Mrs Wadley (O) 1912 Church Street; number un-certain
259 Earth closets

 

[Then 3 cottages; new house there since]

Highfields Road, Caperners Green Misses Shoobridge (O) 1912 47 Highfields Road
260 House & Shop

 

[Probably not built; superseded by 262]

Newland Street Richard Sorrell (O) 1913 141 Newland Street
261 [missing]

 

[also see 267]

262 House Newland Street R Sorrell (O) 1913 141 Newland Street
263 Conservatory & Smoking Room Thirroul, Avenue Road G E Dale (O); A F Lewis & Sons (B) 1913 PSE
264 Conversion into common lodging house.

 

[Since demolished]

The late Bell Inn, Maldon Road The Chelmsford Brewery Co Ltd (O); Charles & W H Pertwee, Chelmsford (A) 1913 37-39 Maldon Road
265 Electric Theatre (Picture Palace)

 

[Not built. Had arc light. On plan is between Mr Poulter (at no.147 according to Albert P) and Mr Ellis (149 according to directories)]

Newland Street Witham and District Electric Theatre Co. (Frank Tunbridge, The Olde Friars, Temperance Hotel, Chelmsford) (O); J W Cobb, Margaretting (A) 1913 Between 147 Newland Street and 149 Newland Street ?
266 Cart Shed

 

[Can’t see approval stamp. Since burnt down]

Avenue Road and Station Road A Wallis for Cooper, Taber & Co Ltd, Witham (O) 1913 Cooper Taber warehouse, Avenue Road, now site of c.28-32 Avenue Road
267 Six Cottages on smallholdings (see also 267A-267F) Howbridge Hall Farm Essex County Council (O); W J Pulford (agent to ECC) (A) [267 includes some plans from 261] 1913 Various; see 267A – 267F
267A One of six Cottages on smallholdings; smallholding no.182 Howbridge Hall Farm (sub-letters A to F given by Janet Gyford for this list) Essex County Council (O); W J Pulford (agent to ECC) (A) [267 includes some plans from 261] 1913 Home farm, Howbridge Hall Road
267B One of six Cottages on smallholdings; smallholding no.183

 

[Demolished 1990s or 2000-2001]

Howbridge Hall Farm (sub-letters A to F given by Janet Gyford for this list) Essex County Council (O); W J Pulford (agent to ECC) (A) [267 includes some plans from 261] 1913 Pondholton farm (part), Maltings Lane (next to 138)
267C One of six Cottages on smallholdings; smallholding no.184 Howbridge Hall Farm (sub-letters A to F given by Janet Gyford for this list) Essex County Council (O); W J Pulford (agent to ECC) (A) [267 includes some plans from 261] 1913 Howbridge Hall farmhouse, 63 Howbridge Road
267D One of six Cottages on smallholdings; smallholding no.185 Howbridge Hall Farm (sub-letters A to F given by Janet Gyford for this list) Essex County Council (O); W J Pulford (agent to ECC) (A) [267 includes some plans from 261] 1913 21 Hatfield Road (formerly Laburnum Cottage)
267E One of six Cottages on smallholdings; smallholding no.186

 

[Since demolished and replaced by Galpin House (flats]

Howbridge Hall Farm (sub-letters A to F given by Janet Gyford for this list) Essex County Council (O); W J Pulford (agent to ECC) (A) [267 includes some plans from 261] 1913 1 Hatfield Road
267F One of six Cottages on smallholdings; smallholding no.187 Howbridge Hall Farm (sub-letters A to F given by Janet Gyford for this list) Essex County Council (O); W J Pulford (agent to ECC) (A) [267 includes some plans from 261] 1913 92a Maldon Road (formerly Meadow View)
268 Two Houses Blunts Hall Road Hon C H Strutt (O); H W Richards (B) 1913 30-32 Blunts Hall Road
269 Alterations & Additions

 

[Nice drawings. No approval stamp]

Globe Inn, Newland Street Messrs William Bright and Sons Ltd (O); James W Clark, Chelmsford (A) 1913 132 Newland Street
270 Additions to Seed Warehouse

 

 

[Can’t see approval. Since burnt down]

Avenue Road and Station Road H Simpson, director, Cooper, Taber Co Ltd, 26? Southwark Street, SE (O) 1914 Cooper Taber warehouse, Avenue Road, now site of c.28-32 Avenue Road
271 Addition to Dean House Chalks Road Mrs Wadley (O); H W Richards (B) 1914 Dean House, 21 Chalks Road
272 Two Cottages

 

 

[Timbering now painted at 40 and covered at 42]

Braintree Road G Little (O); J D Dean (B) 1914 40-42 Braintree Road
273 House Collingwood Road Albert Wallis, Holmesdale, Witham (O) 1914 35 Collingwood Road
274 Engine Room

 

 

[Can’t see approval]

The Glove Factory, Chipping Hill W Pinkham (O); Joseph Smith & Son, Witham (B) 1914 Glove factory, 1 Chipping Hill
275 Bookstall & Tea House Grounds of the Rifle Range (water from stand pipe in Powershall End) W H Smith & Son, 128 Strand, London (O), by permission of the Army Council 1914 Powershall End (exact location not known)
276 Alterations and additions (new shop front, and extension to bakery) Witham Co-op premises Witham Co-op (O); Goodey and Cressall, Colchester (A)- 1915 113 Newland Street (shop front), 115 Newland Street (bakery)
277 Motor House Collingwood Road Oscar Heddle esq. (owner); C Blade Wenden, Witham (builder) 1915 48 Collingwood Road
278 Office Collingwood Road Witham Cartage and Coal Company (C C S[?] Roberts, sec) 1915 2 Collingwood Road now site of Ben Sainty Court)
279 Bungalow

Called ‘The Cottage’ on 1922 O.S. Since considerably extended and heightened

Maldon Road Grahame Brown (O), J D Dean, Witham (B) 1915 Lound Lodge, Maldon Road
280 Engine and boiler house (amended by 283)

 

[Since demolished]

Mill Lane Rowland Stagg Ltd., Witham (O) 1915 Tannery, Mill Lane (north of 21 Mill Lane)
281 Bathroom (probably first floor). Spread Eagle Hotel, High Street Chelmsford Brewery Co Ltd (O); Mawhood and Son, 17 Market Road, Chelmsford (A) 1915 Spread Eagle Hotel, 49 Newland Street
282 [missing]
283 Engine House (amended from 280)

 

[Since demolished]

Mill Lane Rowland Stagg Ltd. (per H Hodgman) (O) 1916 Tannery, Mill Lane (north of 21 Mill Lane)
284 Pair of cottages (s-d)

 

[Perhaps not built: not on 1922 O.S.]

Olivers farm, Maldon Road J D Dean, Witham (B), ‘with permission of Ministry of Munitions’ 1917 South of Olivers farm, Maldon Road
285 Engine house extension Chipping Hill National Glove Co., Witham (O); C Blade Wenden, Witham (B) 1918 Glove factory, 1 Chippjng Hill
286 Motor house Collingwood Road A C Mens esq (O); J D Dean, Witham (B) 1919 10 Collingwood Road
287 Conservatory

 

[Nice drawing of fancy fretwork]

Collingwood Road A C Mens esq (O); C Blade Wenden, Witham (B) 1919 10 Collingwood Road
288 Factory Braintree Road Crittall Manufacturing Company (O); Bradshaw, Gass and Hope FRIBA, Bolton (A) 1919 (appr) Crittall’s factory, Braintree Road
289 Three cottages (ter) Maldon Road A C Mens (O); J D Dean, ‘builder, contractor, decorator and undertaker, Witham’ (B) 1919 Olivers Cottages, Maldon Road
290 Alterations, provision of lavatories London Joint City and Midland Bank, Witham House London Joint City and Midland Bank (O); T B Whinney, FRIBA, 8 Old Jewry, London DC (A) 1919 57 Newland Street
291 Operators and Winding Rooms (on balcony, for showing films; see photo M708) Public Hall, Collingwood Road Charles and W H Pertwee, Chelmsford (A) 1919 Public Hall, 12 Collingwood Road
292 Motor garage (probably commercial garage) Maldon Road Wakelin and Leeding, Freebournes, Witham (per J S Leeding) (O) 1919 Then north of 77 Maldon Road, later Rowley’s garage; site now part of 77-83 Maldon Road
293 Granary

 

[Plan includes ‘War Stores Ground’ to the south]

Maldon Road Witham Cartage Company (O); J D Dean, Witham (B) 1919 Maldon Road, east side probably south of Blackwater Lane
294 [missing]
295 ‘Motor House’. Commercial showroom for ‘motor engineers’.

 

[Nice elevation]

Newland Street Messrs Wakelin and Leeding, Witham (O); Unit Construction Co Ltd, 246 High Holborn WC1 (B &/or A) 1919 3 Newland Street (Freebournes)
296 [missing]
297 Bungalow

 

[Converted army hut. Nice elevation. Since demolished]

Maldon Road J D Dean, Witham (O? and B) 1920 Site of ‘Lanner’, Maldon Road
298 Motor House (probably commercial) White Horse Lane Messrs Hurrell and Beardwell (O); J D Dean (B) 1920 White Horse Lane, north side, former builders’ yard
299 Garage and Stores Chipping Hill National Glove Co. (O); C Blade Wenden, Witham (B) 1920 Glove factory, 1 Chipping Hill
300 Offices Braintree Road Messrs T Cullen and Sons (O); C Blade Wenden, Witham (B) 1920 Part of 49 Braintree Road (single storey building on Braintree Road frontage)
301 Garage (commercial)

 

[Built from army hut (wood)]

Newland Street Glover Bros Ltd. (O) 1920 Rear of 155-157 Newland Street
302 Alterations

 

[Detailed plan of pub]

Albert Hotel Messrs Russell’s Gravesend Brewery (O); J D Dean, Witham (B) 1920 Albert public house, 2 Chipping Hill
303 Motor house Collingwood Road Witham Cartage Company (O); J D Dean, Witham (B) 1920 2 Collingwood Road, now site of Ben Sainty Court
304 Additions to house and shop Newland Street William Gage (O) 1920 48 Newland Street
305 Two bungalows (s-d)

 

[Two sets of plans, later ones substituted for earlier ones. Letter shows that was known in 1950 as Medway bungalow]

Maldon Road Walter Butler esq. (O); A R Dannatt, Braintree (A); J D Dean, Witham (B) 1920 Derwent and Conder, Maldon Road, west side, south of Maltings Lane
306 Nurses’ bungalow

 

[Letter says the submission is for Governement grant. Interesting plans]

Collingwood Road Frank Sherrin, A R Dannatt, ‘Great Square, Braintree’ (A) 1920 46 Collingwood Road
307 Alterations

 

[Plan of bar etc.]

White Hart Tap Messrs Russell’s Gravesend Brewery (O); J D Dean, Witham (B) 1921 White Hart Hotel, Newland Street
308 Additions.

 

[Good plans of bars etc]

The Swan, Newland Street James W Clark, Coggeshall (A and S) 1921 Swan public house, 153 Newland Street
309 Bath room and scullery etc. 3 Grove Terrace, Newland Street Mr Varden (O); W Wager and Son, Maldon Road, Witham (B) 1921 8 Newland Street
310 Cycle shop

 

[Superseded by 314]

Bridge Street W J Marshall (O) 1921 27A Bridge Street
311 Additions

 

[Shows day and night nurseries]

Iolanda House W Cecil Bywater (O); D G Armstrong (A?) 1921 Barnardiston House, 35 Chipping Hill
312 Motor house and store Newland Street Messrs Luckin Smith (O); C E Johnson, Rayne (B and/or A?) 1921 50 Newland Street
313 Carbide Store

 

[Date of

appro not given but appro stamp signed]

Crittall’s, Braintree Road Crittall Manufacturing Company (O) 1921 Crittall’s factory, Braintree Road
314 Cycle shop (superseding 310) Bridge Street W J Marshall (O) 1921 27A Bridge Street
315 Open cartshed Collingwood Road Witham Cartage and Coal Co Ltd. (by A C Mens) (O) 1921 2 Collingwood Road, now site of Ben Sainty Court
316 Alterations and additions

 

[Good plan of bars etc.]

Victoria, Powershall T D Ridley and Sons Ltd, Hartford End Brewery (O); Jas W Clark, Coggeshall (A) 1921 Victoria public house, Powershall End
317 Alteration; new fish shop from cart shed etc.

 

[New fish shop is probably now Tommy Tuckers]

Mill Lane H Lawrence (O); J W Clark, Coggeshall (A) 1921 132 Newland Street and/or 2 Mill Lane
318 Additions Glove factory, Chipping Hill National Glove Co., by W Pinkham (O) 1921 Glove factory, 1 Chipping Hill
319 Seed warehouse Braintree Road Messrs Thomas Cullen and Sons (O); J D Dean, Witham (B) 1921 Part of 49 Braintree Road (in yard, in front of entrance from Braintree Road.
320 Office White Horse Lane Hurrell and Beardwell (O); J D Dean (B) 1921 White Horse Lane, north side, former builders’ yard
321 Alterations and lavatories

 

[Plan of bars etc.]

Red Lion Hotel, High Street Russell’s Gravesend Brewery (O); J D Dean, Witham (B) 1921 Red Lion hotel, 7 Newland Street
322 House

 

[No form or details, just a block plan]

Collingwood Road 1921 25 Collingwood Road
323 Warehouse {?some plans xeroxed and numbered by me as 323 look like 347, Ox wrks, CHECK} Crittall’s, Braintree Road Crittall Manufacturing Company (O); Bradshaw, Gass and Hope FRIBA, Bolton (A) 1921
338 Addition (WC) Pelican Cottage, Collingwood Road Miss C A Pattisson 1923 16 Collingwood Road
339 ? Angel Inn, Newland Street and Maldon Road Baddow Brewery (O); C and W H Pertwee and Howard, The Institute, London Road, Chelmsford (A) 39 Newland Street
340
341
342 House Grove estate Messrs Wager and Son (O); C. and W H Pertwee and Howard, ‘Chelmsford’ (A) 1923
347 Oxygen Works

 

[See 323 for plans also]

Braintree Road British Oxygen Co and Crittall Manufacturing Company (O); Bishop and Etherington-Smith, 30 Duke Street, St James (A) 1924 (appr)
351 Three staff cottages Bridge Home Royal Eastern Counties Institution (O); F Douglas Turner, ‘MB, Essex Hall, Colchester’ (A) 1924 1-3 Spinks Lane
354 Six cottages Crittall Manufacturing Co. (O); C H B Quennell, 43 Bedford Row, WC1 (A) 1924 (appr) Manor Road
368 Alterations 34 Newland Street W E Bull (O) 1925
369 Conversion to lead glazing factory The Old Maltings, Maltings Lane Crittall Manufacturing Co (O); C H B Quennell, 43 Bedford Row, WC1 (A) 1925 (appr)
370 Pair of cottages Rickstones Road Crittall Manufacturing Co (O); C H B Quennell, 43 Bedford Row, WC1 (A) 1926 4-6 Rickstones Road?
371
372
373 373-500 no plans; numbers not used? No plans (numbers not used?)
501 Parlour type houses Rivenhall Road Crittall Manufacturing Co. (O); C H B Quennell, 43 Bedford Row, WC1 (A) 1926 4-6 Rickstones Road?
528 Conversion into shops and flats Angel inn, Newland Street W Wager and Son, ‘builders and decorators, Maldon Road, plumbers, sanitary engineers and hot water fitters, pump work, well boring and sinking a speciality’ (O) (B); W H Pertwee and Howard, ‘FLRIBA, Architects and Surveyors’ (A) 1927 39 Newland Street
556 Convert army cookhouse into two cottages Maltings Baird 1927
568 House White Horse Lane F H Fuller (O) 1927 Stefre, White Horse Lane
580 Social club

 

[Single storey, huts from Braintree]

Braintree Road Crittall Manufacturing Co, Building Department, Silver End (O) 1928
581 Cinema and concert hall

 

[Not built]

The Avenue, corner of Newland Street, east side Francis Bertram 1928
582 Conversion to cinema Whitehall, Newland Street W M Gaze 1928
626A New window store Braintree Road Crittall Manufacturing Co, Building Department, Silver End (O) 1930
671 New Peculiar Chapel and school Guithavon Valley Peculiar Chapel Trustees (O); W J Redhead, ‘Nanteos’, The Avenue, Witham (A) 1932
678 House

 

[Not built; replaced by 688]

Powershall End H H Gepp (O); A Douglas Robinson FRIBA, 104 Queen Victoria Street, EC4, and 15 East Hill, Colchester (A) CANCELLED 1932 Well House, 38 Powershall End
684 Gospel Hall Rickstones Road Mrs [or Miss] Blyth 1932
688 House Powershall End H H Gepp (O); A Douglas Robinson FRIBA, 104 Queen Victoria Street, EC4, and 15 East Hill, Colchester (A) 1932
725 Additions to power house Glove factory
727 Addition, schoolroom on back Methodist church, Guithavon Street W J Redhead, ‘Nanteos, The Avenue, Witham’ (A or B?) 1933
728 Shop with living accommodation over Newland Street H G Cook esquire (O); W J Redhead, ‘Nanteos, The Avenue, Witham’ (A or B?) 1933 5 and 5A Newland Street?
745 Lock-up shop 35 Newland Street F W Woolworth (O) 1934 (appr)
756 Alterations to house and shop Newland Street H G Cook
764 Alterations 46-48 Church Street F Hasler (O); Richards (B) 1934
777 Extension Glove factory Messrs Pinkham and Son Ltd
780 Extension (east end) Pantiles, Powershall End H H Gepp (O); A Douglas Robinson FRIBA, 104 Queen Victoria Street, EC4, and 15 East Hill, Colchester (A) 1935 (app) Well House
830 New Houses Cocks farm, Chalks Lane Adams and Mortimer (B) 1935 Chalks Road, St Nicholas Road (called Jubilee Road on plan)
838 Addition to office (probably adding new first floor) Braintree Road British Oxygen Company (O); Richards and Son (B) 1936
851 Two pairs of semi-detached houses Cocks farm, Chalks Lane Adams and Mortimer (B) 1936 Blanfred and Floreat, Chalks Road, 1 and 2 St Nicholas Road
885 Extension to factory Silver End Crittall Manufacturing Co (O) 1936
886 Extension to factory, (and moving fence back?)

 

[Replaced by 904]

Braintree Road Crittall Manufacturing Co, Braintree, Technical Department (O) 1936 First floor Social Club
904 Final plans for improvement and extension at Witham (as 886?)

 

[Replacing 886]

Braintree Road Crittall Manufacturing Co, Braintree, Technical Department (one plan signed V J Crittall) (O) 1936 First floor Social Club
1005 Rebuilding public house Morning Star, Bridge Street 1938
1027 Post Office, sorting office and garage Newland Street H M Office of Works, Dean Bradley House, Westminster, SW (O); W Sharpe Esq, Sanitary Engineer (A) 1939
1038 Automatic Telephone Exchange

 

[‘The whole of the site [in front] to be cleared of fruit trees and turfed’ – now stands at side of newer exchange]

Collingwood Road H M Office of Works (O); G H Ledger, ARIBA, H M Office of Works (A) 1939 19? Collingwood Road
1137 Conversion of barn to dwelling house Moat farm 1945
1170 Bungalow Highfields Road, behind Bankside, next to railway Mr and Mrs Mortimer (O); A W Wright, Builder, 7 Braintree Road (B) 1946
1177 Amended layout, housing estate Moat Farm estate (cancelled) 1946
1192 Alterations to school The Lawn Miss B English (O) 1946
1197 Extension of factory Glove factory W Pinkham and Sons (O); C H Harris, Architect and Surveyor, 27 Gloucester Place, W1 (A) 1948?  s

 

Gas

 

GAS IN WITHAM


Important:

(1) See also  ‘lighting’ re street lights
(2) See also notes on ERO D/F 27/7/1, minutes of Witham Gas Co 1907-1926
(3) See also notes on PRO BT 31/34043/1954, Witham Gas Co files (two volumes).
(4) See also JG’s photo collections especially:

(a) ‘M’ miscellaneous collection, M62 gas works; M63 workers at gas works; M215, M298, M662, M1102, M1722 Newland Street including gas manager’s house; M299, M1063 date plaque from gas manager’s house; M600 group of builders at gas works; M810 and M811, horse at gas works after winning prize in show in 1920; M1217, Charles Capon at gas works.

(b) ‘P’ personal collection, P23/20, P26/5, tombstone of James Church in All Saints churchyard (‘MR JAMES CHURCH / formerly of Rochester / AND 22 YEARS MANAGER OF THE / GAS WORKS IN THIS TOWN / WHO DIED MARCH 3 1858 / AGED 67 YEARS / … ALSO OF / MARY / RELICT OF THE ABOVE / WHO DIED AT CHICHESTER[?] FEBRUARY 1870[?]’); P187/2A-4A, date plaque from gas manager’s house.


Directories, quotations from introductory sections

1848 The Gas Works were established in 1834, at the cost of about £850, and a similar sum was expended in 1847, in making a new gasometer, and in extending the gas pipes to Chipping Hill and the Railway Station. The charge for lights is 10s., and for cooking purposes only 6s. per 1,000 cubic feet.
1855 to 1933 The town is lighted with gas [by a company formed in 1834]

[the latter added in later editions]

1863 Newland Street … is connected with Bridge street … These and the few short cross streets, are now well paved and lit with gas. The Gas Works were established in 1834, at the cost of about £850, and a similar sum was expended in 1847, in making a new gasometer, and in extending the gas pipes to Chipping Hill and the Railway Station. The works have now cost about £2,000, raised in £20 shares. Mr Richd Stevens is clerk to the Gas Co., and Mr Robt Robinson, manager of the works.
1937 ‘The town is lighted with electricity’


D
irectories: people

Year Manager etc Sec etc.
1839 Butler, Thomas, treasurer, Gas works
1848 Church, James, manager, Gas Works
1855 Church Jas. superintendent of gas works Banks Edward Wilson, clerk to commissioners of land & assessed taxes, & secretary to gas company
1859 Stevens Richard, solicitor clerk to commissioners of land & assessed taxes, secretary to the gas company
1863 Robinson, Robert, manager, Gas Works, Newland Street
1866, 1870, 1874 Witham Gas & Coke Co. (limited) (Richd. Stevens, esq. sec.), Gas works
1878, 1882, 1886, 1890 Witham Gas & Coke Co. Limited (Richd. Stevens, sec.; Robt. Robinson, manager), Gas works
1895, 1899 Witham Gas & Coke Co. Limited (Frank Postle Bawtree sec.; Robt. Robinson manager), Gas works
1902, 1906, 1908, 1910 Witham Gas & Coke Co. Limited (Frank Postle Bawtree, sec.; James Croxall, manager), Gas works
1912, 1914, 1917 Witham Gas & Coke Co. Limited (John Francis Bawtree, sec; James Croxall, manager), Gas works
1922 Witham Gas & Coke Co. Ltd. (Hugh Francis Bawtree, sec.; Jas. Croxall, manager), Gas works
1926 Witham Gas Light & Coke Co. Ltd (Hugh Francis & John Francis Bawtree, joint secs.; Jas.Croxall, manager, Gas works. T N 61
1929 Witham Gas Light & Coke Co. Ltd. (Hugh Francis & John Francis Bawtree, joint secs.; Jas.. Croxall, mngr.), Gas works, High st. T N 61
1933 Witham Gas Light & Coke Co. Ltd. (Andrew Kellard, sec.; A.T.Howard. mngr.), Gas works, High st. T N 61
1937 Witham Gas Light & Coke Co. Ltd; (A. J. Mumford sec.; W J. Mulley, manager), Gas works, High st.

 


 

Other sources, in date order

Chelmsford Chronicle, 20 November 1835
Witham lighted with Gas
On the [???] inst. the town of Witham was brilliantly lighted with gas for the first time, and much delight was manifested by the inhabitants at the successful conclusion of their undertaking. A band paraded the town during the evening, and an excellent dinner comprising among other good things, two legs of mutton and some fine ribs of beef, which were cooked [???] was partaken of at the works by the trustees and inspectors, W W Luard esq in the chair. The inhabitants are greatly indebted to the exertions of Messrs Butler, Beadel and Banks, under whose immediate superintendence this invaluable improvement to the town has been effected, and great credit is due to Mr Church, manager of the Chelmsford gas works, for his able execution of the work entrusted to him. There are 80 private and 26 public lamps already fixed, a considerable accession to the former is expected’.

1841 census, HO 107/343/16, f.18, p.6, High Street

James Church 45 Gas factor not born in Essex
Mary Church 45 not born in Essex
Robert Church 20 Gas factor not born in Essex
John Church 15 Cutler ap not born in Essex
Emily Church 11 not born in Essex
Mary Church 9 mo born in Essex
/
Eliza Shelley 20 Dress maker born in Essex

Chelmsford Chronicle, 16 September 1842, page 3

‘Dinner to Thomas Butler, Esq. On Monday last, the shareholders of the Witham Gas Works gave a dinner to Thos Butler Esq, their treasurer, in acknowledgement of his exertions in their behalf, the gas being remarkably good, and an annual dividend of 7½ per cent having been paid during the last two years. On the occasion about twenty gentlemen sat down to an excellent dinner at the Blue Post Inn, when W W Luard, Esq. presided, with E N Banks, Esq. as his vice-chairman, and after the usual routine, the chairman in proposing “The health of the Treasurer of the Gas Works,” presented him on the behalf of the shareholders with a very handsome silver inkstand, bearing the following inscription – Presented by the Shareholders of the Witham Gas Works to Thomas Butler, Esq., Their Treasurer, 12 Sep 1842’.

1851 census, HO 107/1783, f.209, p.26, schedule 93, Newland Street

James Church Head M 58 Gas factor employing 2 men born Kent, Rochester
Mary Church Wife M 58 Wife of ditto born Kent, Gravesend
Mary Church Dau 10 Scholar born Essex, Witham
Louisa Ely Granddau 9 Visitor born Essex, Witham
Martha Church Granddau 5 Visitor born Essex, Maldon

 

1861 census, RG 9/1107, f.86, p.159, Gas works

Robert Robinson Head M 36 Gas engineer born America
Emily Robinson Wife M 29 born Kent, Chatham
Leila Ada Robinson Dau 3 born Wales, Paxham
Mary Church Visitor Wid 60 Independent born Kent, Gravesend
Sarah Boltwood Serv 15 House servant born Essex, Wickham

 

1871 census, RG 10/1695, f.38, p.1, Newland Street

Robert Robinson H M 48 Manager of gas works employing 2 men and 1 boy born Canada (British subject)
Clementina Thirza Bentall U 24 Companion housekeeper born Essex, Rayleigh
Arthur Robert Robinson S 6 Scholar born Essex, Witham
Lucy Belsham Robinson S 3 Scholar born Essex, Witham
Clement Marten S 16 mo born Essex, Witham

 

1881 census, RG 11/1809, f.50, p.28, schedule 160, Newland Street, Gas house

Robert Robinson H M 56 Gas works manager empl 4 men born Kingston, Upper Canada, British subject
Janette Robinson W M 35 Wife born Essex, Rayleigh
Arthur Robinson S U 16 Son born Essex, Witham
Percy Robinson S 13 Scholar born Essex, Witham
Clement Robinson S 11 Scholar born Essex, Witham
Alice Owers Serv 17 Domestic servant general born Essex, White Notley

 

1891 census, RG 12/1425, f.42, p.24, schedule 159, High Street, Gas House

Robert Robinson Head M 66 Manager of Witham Gas Works born Canada
Olivia Robinson Wife M 4-? born Essex, Rayleigh
Percy B? Robinson Son S 23 Engineer, Civil Marine born Essex, Witham
Ellen Coker Serv S 14 General servant domestic born Essex, Goldhanger

 

1901 census, RG 13/1725, f.44, p.13, schedule 101, High Street, gas works

James Croxall Head M 34 Manager Gas works (worker) born Staffs, Burslem
Frances Croxall Wife M 33 born Staffs, Burslem
Eva Croxall Dau 7 born Staffs, Burslem
Gladys Croxall Dau 5 born Staffs, Biddulph
George R Croxall Son 3 born Staffs, Biddulph

 

UDC, 18 December 1911
page 9. Gas Company agrees to lay gas main in Guithavon Road and erect lamps at usual cost per lamp. Agreed to have four.

UDC, 29 January 1912
page 14. ‘Petition for gas lamps from residents of Chalks Road and Braintree Road was read also a further petition for lamps from residents of Albert Road’. Discussion. Mr Pinkham proposed Gas Company be asked if would lay gas mains and put up lamps if the Council acceded to petition. Approved nem. con.

UDC 26 February 1912
page 20. Gas Company agreed mains in Albert Road and extension in Braintree Road and Chalks Road to be further considered. Accept.

UDC, 25 March 1912
page 24. Seven lime trees planted in Collingwood Road to replace dead ones. Write to Gas Company informing them that gas escape in Collingwood Road detrimental to trees, please remedy.
page 27. Ask Gas Company for additional terms for lighting street lamps every night from 1 August to 30 April instead of leaving out five nights every full noon as now.

UDC, 29 April 1912, Annual meeting
page 33. Gas Company said roots of trees caused the escape of gas. Told to write and say ‘the gas escaped before the trees were planted’.
page 34. Move that Witham Gas Company be asked to stop closure for full moon and reduce price generally.
page 35. Gas Company agreed to gas mains in Braintree Road and Chalks Lane, on conditions.

UDC 30 September 1912
page 67. ‘A runaway horse having knocked a tree down in Collingwood Road, this tree and other defective trees were ordered to be replaced’. Write again to Gas Company about damage from their defective mains.

Essex County Chronicle, 5 March 1915
page 8 (see xerox on newspaper file). Witham Gas Company. E M Blyth presided at annual meeting. Increased consumption because of presence of soldiers in Witham. Very satisfactory in spite of increased cost of coal. Showroom built at cost of £95. Dividend 7½ %. W Bindon Blood re-elected chair, Blyth vice chair. T Speakman elected director in place of late Mr Cranfield.

UDC 30 October 1916
page 349. Writ from Gas Company against Council for not adhering to agreement (probably about street lighting’. To be a meeting. 

UDC 27 November 1916
page 355. In Camera: Re Gas Company. Terms in letter accepted.

 Essex Weekly News, 8 March 1918
page 6. 
‘Witham Gas Company. Yesterday the 58th annual meeting of the Witham Gas Co was held, Mr E M Blyth, chairman, presiding. The report stated that the business continued to be in a satisfactory condition. Two cottages adjoining the Company’s premises had been purchased to provide additional storage room when required. The directors, after careful consideration, decided to undertake the carting of coal, which they hoped would in future effect a good saving. The balance sheet showed a profit of £435 4s 4d upon an outlay of £5,706 14s 2d, against £583 1s 5d upon an outlay of £5,140 3s 9d last year. The report and balance sheet were adopted and a dividend of 6% declared. Messrs S Abrey, D Brown and N Linley Howlett were re-elected directors and Mr W G Naylor was re-appointed auditor’.

Essex Weekly News, 14 March 1919
page 6.  Annual meeting of Gas Co on March 6. Mr E M Blyth presided. Dividend of 6 per cent declared [no other info]

Braintree and Witham Times, March 1930
Looked for anything on AGM 20 March when several directors gave up, but couldn’t find.

Braintree and Witham Times, August 1930
Looked for anything on meeting 1 August but couldn’t find.

Braintree and Witham Times, 28 November 1930 page 4 col 3.  ‘Artful Thief at Witham. Gasworks stoker heavily fined for stealing boots’. Arthur Shelley, young stoker, of Maldon Road. Two pairs of boots. Strenuous denials. Inspector Girt called him ‘an artful and petty thief’’. Magistrates convicted. Fined £10 or 2 months in prison. Bricklayer from London said he’d left boots over weekend. Shelley said he’d bought them in Chelmsford market and had them repaired by Charles Walter Rallings of Mill Lane, Witham. Another prosecutor, Robert Treacher, had lost shoes. Police sergeant Claydon and Supt Whiting. Shelley a single man. Others things missed. No previous convictions and excellent character as workman. So fined and to pay £1 a week. Earned 58s per week.

Braintree and Witham Times, March/April 1931
Looked for anything on AGM 30 March when all new directors but couldn’t find.

Braintree and Witham Times, 25 February 1932
p.4.
Leader about Witham siren. At Gas works and needs 40lb pressure to fire it. Usually police tell gas works to fire it. Perhaps electric would be better.

Braintree and Witham Times, 7 April 1932
page 10. James Croxall retired on 31 March after 33 years, reaching age of 65. Gas works remodelled since he came. 

Braintree and Witham Times, March/April 1932 Looked for anything on AGM 28 March when all new directors but couldn’t find. 

UDC Public Health Committee, 19 October 1932
page 47. Heard that Gas Company plan to put new gas main in Church Street from White Horse corner to Chalks Lane and through Chalks Lane to Braintree Road. Footpath will be broken up. No notice received.

UDC Public Health Committee, 16 November 1932
Gas mains now done in Church Street etc.

UDC Public Health Committee, 14 December 1932 page 66. Rev Campbell has suggested ‘that the light now at Chipping Hill immediately opposite the cottage site purchased from Mr Richards, be moved nearer the Pillar Box close to Mr Doole’s shop. This spot is in darkness and formerly a gas lamp was there which was very convenient for persons using the box at light’. Yes.
Also ask Gas Company to ‘move a gas standard now standing on the island in Avenue Road outside Messrs Cooper Taber’s factory, ‘to make room for the electric lamp now on that corner to be removed there to improve lighting there’.

UDC Housing Committee, 19 November 1935
page 201. Housing for aged persons. Proceed on revised estimates. Ministry of Health wanted price reducing by £10 per bungalow. Include increasing lavatory space to give enough room for baths in future but not necessary to have baths now. Gas Company to pipe bungalows and lights and coppers free. 

UDC Water, Highways and Works Committee, 17 June 1936
page 422. East Anglian Electricity Supply Co don’t want to quote for fire alarms. So ask if Crittall’s and Witham Gas Co will agree to use their hooters for next 12 months.

UDC Water, Highways and Works Committee, 15 July 1936
page 465. Gas Company agreeable to using hooter at night as fire alarm. Recommend it be retained as such. 

UDC Water, Highways and Works Committee, 18 November 1936
page 583. Ask Gas Company to quote for two lamps in Homefield Road.

UDC Water, Highways and Works Committee, 18 November 1936
page 583. Ask Gas Company to quote for two lamps in Homefield Road.
page 584. OK for Gas Company to open Chalks Lane to lay gas mains.

UDC Water, Highways and Works Committee, 16 December 1936
page 627. Quotes from Gas Company for two lights at Homefield Road [electricity also seem to have quoted but gas a bit less and accepted] 

UDC Housing Committee, 15 March 1937
page 712. Accept offer from Gas Company to ‘carcase’ Church Street houses (52 of them, probably east side) and fix lighting in each room with point for cooking, at no cost to Council. 

Braintree and Witham Times, 12 January 1939
page 1.
Advert. ‘The Witham Gas Light and Coke Company Ltd. invite you to a further series of Cookery Demonstrations at the British Legion Hall, Mill Lane, Witham commencing at 3 p.m., Thursday, January 26th. Menu for first week will be puddings for all seasons’.

Essex Weekly News, 5 October 1945,
page 14.
‘WITHAM GAS LIGHT AND COKE COMPANY, LTD., ECONOMY IN THE USE OF GAS. The Company respectfully begs to urge on all consumers the imperative need for the utmost economy in the use of gas from now and during the coming winter.
With such co-operation it should be possible to meet all reasonable demands, but otherwise it is more than likely that pressures may again have to be reduced.
DON’T WASTE GAS. TURN OFF THAT TAP.
S F Gardiner, Engineer and Manager, 2nd October 1945’.


From ERO online catalogue

ERO D/DU 56/5
Estate Auction book (name of auctioneers on cover in Messrs Coote and Abrey of Witham). A few entries relate to auctions of shares in the … ‘Witham Gas Company’, (p. 127) … 1858-1888 9

T/P 175/10/3 Sale catalogue of shop and dwelling house in Newland St., Witham; cottages in Wickham Bishops; shares in Witham Gas Co., 1905

D/F 27/7
Minute books of meetings of directors and shareholders of Witham Gas Light and Coke Company (see separate doc for notes)

Witham Parish records
D/P 30/24/16 Special district rate for lighting by gas.
1860-1868
D/P 30/24/17 Special district rate for lighting by gas
1863-1866
D/P 30/24/18 Special district rate for lighting by gas
1867
D/P 30/24/19 Special district rate for lighting by gas
D/P 30/24/20 Special district rate for lighting by gas
1857-1859


Gas company, Transco records
From A2A web site, March 2004
Reference Code: EA:WIG. WITHAM GAS LIGHT AND COKE COMPANY
Creation dates: 1926 – 1949.
2 FILES. Held at: Transco plc.
Administrative History
Formed in 1860. On Nationalisation in 1949 the undertaking became part of the Chelmsford Group of the Ipswich Division of EGB
EA:WIG/A/M/1
Minute Book of Directors’ meetings 8 Oct 1926 – 27 Apr 1949. Creation dates: 1926 – 1949.
EA:WIG/E/F/1
Three black and white photographs of new gas holder foundation. Creation dates: 1948.
Reference Code: EA:BIG. BRITISH GAS LIGHT COMPANY LTD (CENTRAL OFFICE)
Creation dates: 1824 – 1949. Held at: Transco plc


Administrative History of British Company
The British Gas Light Company was formed in 1824 with the objective “.. to contract with and supply Light to Towns or Places that may require Gas.” The first permanent chairman was Jacob George Wrench, appointed in May 1825. In 1829 an AoP was obtained which incorporated the London station and effectively separated the London undertaking from the rest of the company’s undertakings. The incorporated London company operated mainly in the east end of London until 1852 when it was purchased by the Commercial Gas Co. Lighting contracts were obtained in Limehouse, Whitechapel and Mile End. Offers to purchase the works of the Poplar GLCo and the Ratcliff GLCo came to nothing, although after the 1829 Act was obtained, the Co extended its area of supply to districts previously supplied by the Imperial GC and the chartered Gas Light and Coke Co.

After the Act of 1829, the unincorporated part of the company (known as the Provincial Co) established by Deed of Settlement operated seven stations at Norwich, Hull, Trowbridge, the Potteries, Holywell, Ayr and Clonmel in Ireland. In 1857 it was incorporated as a Joint Stock Co with Limited Liability and then in 1924 the constitution was altered by the substitution of a Memorandum and Articles of Association for the original Deed of Settlement. The headquarters of the company were originally in George Yard, Lombard St, London until 1922 when they moved to No.2, The Abbey Garden, Westminster.

The most important stations of the British GLCo were at Norwich and Hull, both purchased in 1825. The company purchased the Norwich Gas Light Company (formed in 1820) which provided oil-gas and operated from a works in the parish of St Stephen. It also established a major coal gas works at Hull, on land at Sculcoates. In 1830 the Company decided to convert the Norwich works to coal gas manufacture and to expand to a new site at Bishop Bridge. By 1853 another new works was completed at St Martin-at-Palace (See EA:NOU). In 1883 the BGLCo erected chemical works at Great Yarmouth, the raw by-products being conveyed from Norwich by river. The Hull works operated alongside the works of the Kingston upon Hull GLCo and later the East Hull Gas Co (See NE:HUB). The works at Ayr were sold to a private owner in 1832 and the undertaking at Clonmel was sold in 1895. The station at the Staffordshire Potteries was sold to Stoke on Trent Borough Council in 1922.

The British GLCo was unique in that it was not only an undertaker in its own right but it also eventually had a controlling interest in 21 gas companies. By 1949 it had 18 subsidiary undertakings in the Eastern GB as well as operating 10 stations of its own, including Aylsham (1933), Bletchley(Fenny Stratford) (1928), Brandon (1935), Chatteris (1938), Diss (1935), Downham Market (1932), Harleston (1928), Mildenhall (1936), Norwich (1857), Thetford, and Wickham. (See EA:EA). Under the Gas Act 1948, special arrangements were made to transfer local undertakings to the relevant Area Gas Board concerned. The records of the Limited Co were retained within the Eastern Gas Board.

[earlier files not noted as not relevant to Witham]

EA:BIG/A/M/11
Minute Book A of the Court of Directors 8 Jan 1930 – 1 Nov 1933
EA:BIG/A/M/12
Minute Book B of the Court of Directors 15 Nov 1933 – 29 Sep 1937
EA:BIG/A/M/13
Minute Book C of the Court of Directors 13 Oct 1937 – 24 Jun 1942
EA:BIG/A/M/14
Minute Book D of the Court of Directors 15 Jul 1942 – 10 Dec 1947
EA:BIG/A/M/15
Minute Book E of the Court of Directors 21 Jan 1948 – 30 Apr 1949
EA:BIG/A/M/16
Minute Book S of the Works Committee Meetings 22 Oct 1930 – 12 Aug 1942
EA:BIG/A/M/17
Minute Book T of the Works Committee Meetings 23 Sep 1942 – 27 Apr 1949
EA:BIG/F/R/1
Bundle of miscellaneous receipts. Creation dates: 1948 – 1949
EA:BIG/L/T/1
British Gas Light Company Ltd and subsidiary companies Register of Deeds (Aylsham to Witham undertakings) 10 Oct 1849 – 14 Aug 1947
EA:BIG/P/L/1
Salaries and Emoluments Register with details of employees including Date of Birth, date entering service and wage details. Creation dates: 1930 – 1949
EA:BIG/P/P/1
Register of Pensions and Allowances, British Gas Light Company, 1 Jul 1930 – 25 Jun 1947


Email exchange with National Gas Archive, Transco, March 2004 (latest first)
To: Janet Gyford
<janet@gyford.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Mar 2004 12:46:04 +0100
Dear Ms Gyford,
I am sorry for the delay in contacting you, however I was unable to attend to your enquiry last week. I have now checked the trade directories which list the Witham Gas Light and Coke Co. as a subsidiary of the British Gas Light Co. from 1934. I have checked the minute book for years 1933-34 but can find no mention of this apart from a note of a loan from the BGLC for £3000 in February 1933. The Deeds register mentioned has two pages of deeds pertaining to Witham. I have looked at the plans which show very little other than a dotted line showing the boundary of the site they do not indicate the layout of the plant etc. and I do not think they would be of interest to you. I f you would care to send a postal address I would be prepared to photocopy the pages from the deed register and the photographs free of charge as we normally provide up to 10 pages free of charge.
To: Janet Gyford <janet@gyford.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 2004 16:17:02 +0000
From: archive@uktransco.com
Message sent by Elaine Brison
Janet,
If you don’t select the ‘catalogue in full’ button on A2A then you will just get entries that include the search term you used. I have attached our list for EA:WIG
(See attached file: EA Witham GLCC.doc)
I am now away until Monday but will then look at the deed register and plans (these may be very similar/duplicates) and let you know what I think its worth having copies of and therefore costs. I’ll also look for details of the BGLC acquisition of Witham in the trade directories and let you know what I can find out.
I will contact you again on Monday
Elaine
National Gas Archive
Europa Court
Europa Boulevard
Warrington WA5 7TN
Tel: 01925 425741
Fax: 01925 425748
email: enquiries@gasarchive.org
www.gasarchive.org

Janet Gyford

<janet@gyford.com

> To: archive@uktransco.com

cc:

17/03/04 12:06 Subject: Re: witham gas light and coke company

Hello Elaine

Many thanks for replying so quickly.

I can’t find any individual EA:WIG references on the A2A site (for instance about the photos you mention), so if you had a list that would be most helpful.

Would it be feasible to order some photocopies by post, e.g. of the relevant pages in the Deeds register EA:BIG/L/T/1, and of the plans you mention in EA/SA/WIG?

As far as I can tell from the company records at the PRO, the British Gas Light Company Ltd started to take over the Witham company in 1930 – if there is any more precise information about this anywhere, it would be useful.

Many thanks again

Janet
At 09:54 17/03/04 +0000, you wrote:

Message sent by Elaine Brison

Dear Ms Gyford,

thank you for your enquiry re Witham Gas light and Coke Company we do not have any further records for the actual Gas Light and Coke Company but do have further records pertaining to the Witham undertaking after Nationalisation of the Gas Industry in 1949 as below, ‘Block plans’ are very simple outlines of where buildings stood on the site:

 

EA:EA/SA/WIG WITHAM

>

ESTATE & PROPERTY

EA:EA/SA/WIG/E/E | ESTATE DRAWINGS

1 Block and floor plan for 86 High Street Drawing. No. S475. 1957

2 Block plan of gas holder site, London Road Drawing No. S495/1A. 1984

3 Block plan gas holder site Drawing No. S495/2. 1985

 

With regards to the references you found on A2A the EA/BIG/L/T/1 is a deeds register which means this does not include the deeds its self but is simple a log book of all deeds created usually giving the names of the parties involved and the land/purpose

 

The EA:WIG refs are fairly self expalnatory – photographs being photographs though I have to say ‘gas holder foundations’ are not very interesting being little more that a hole in the ground. The minute book is a bound volume that holds the official record of meetings held, usually listing those present and itemising matters discussed. The archives are avbailable for viewing by appointment and copying facilities are available at a cost of 20p photocopy (A3 & A4) and £5 per plan copy, Laser prints are also available of photographs at £4 per copy, all copyright lies with the National Gas Archive.

 

I hope this has been of some use,

 

Elaine Brison

Assistant Archivist

 

Janet Gyford

janet@gyford.com

 

To: enquiries@gasarchive.org

16/03/04 12:49 Subject: witham gas light and coke company

 

Hello gas archive

 

I see from the A2A web site that you have some records of the Witham Gas Light and Coke Company in Essex (your ref EA:WIG). Would it be possible for you to tell me a bit more about what these documents comprise, and also whether you have anything else about that company ? I also see Witham referred to under the British Company (EA:BIG/L/T/1) and would be interested in that too.

 

Many thanks

 

Janet Gyford

 

 

GAS WORKS in ESSEX Locations and Key Dates

from John Horne’s gasworks gazetteer, supplied by Michael Leach of Essex Arch and Hist Soc, March 2004

 

Gasworks which were for the exclusive supply of particular private houses, institutions or factories are listed elsewhere.

Most of the Essex gasworks trading in May 1949 were vested in the Eastern Gas Board, the remainder (already owned by the Gas Light & Coke Company), becoming part of the North Thames Gas Board.

 

Corrections and additional information would be welcome. Please contact John Horne on 023 8046 3139. This version updated 8-7-2001 [Address given for him by Michael Leach: Heathermount, Moor Hill Road, West End, Southampton SO30 3AW. ]

 

 

WITHAM, High Street/Mill Lane/Roman Road, Essex n45-11, TL 8241 1542

[1835. Gas plant supplied by the Neath Abbey Ironworks; drawings held by the Glamorgan Archive Service. Glamorgan archives claim in email 29 March to JG that these plans are actually Witham in Somerset; John Horne is investigating]

Richard Stevens was listed as Secretary in the 1859 and 1867 P.O.Directories. He was also a Solicitor and Clerk to the Commissioners of Land and Taxes.

1860: Formation of Witham Gas Light & Coke Company.

In 1870 and 1886 Richard Stevens was secretary. Frank Postle Bawtree was Secretary in 1900. Robert Robinson was manager in 1870 and 1900 (Kelly’s Directory) but GWD&S lists J.Croxall as Manager in 1900.

In 1929 James Croxall was Manager. The Joint Secretaries were Hugh and John Fras of Bawtree.

Control acquired by the British Gas Light & Coke Co.Ltd.

In 1937 W.J.Mulley was Manager. The make that year was 23.8m from 1,504 tons of coal.

By 1948 S.F.Gardiner had taken over as local Engineer & Manager and the make was 36m. Gardiner also managed Halstead and other BGL subsidiaries

1950    Gasmaking ceased during the latter part of the year.

 

WITHAM HOLDER STN., Essex n45-12

The Chelmsford to Colchester main passed through Witham.

The holder(s) had been demolished by October 1985.

Gas in Witham. Various items noted by Janet Gyford, Blanfred, Chalks Road, Witham, Essex, CM8 2BT, up to June 2004

 

Important:

(1) See also document on ‘lighting’ re street lights

(2) See also notes on ERO D/F 27/7/1, minutes of Witham Gas Co 1907-1926

(3) See also notes on PRO BT 31/34043/1954, Witham Gas Co files (two volumes).

(4) See also JG’s photo collections especially:

(a) ‘M’ miscellaneous collection, M62 gas works; M63 workers at gas works; M215, M298, M662, M1102, M1722 Newland Street including gas manager’s house; M299, M1063 date plaque from gas manager’s house; M600 group of builders at gas works; M810 and M811, horse at gas works after winning prize in show in 1920; M1217, Charles Capon at gas works.

(b) ‘P’ personal collection, P23/20, P26/5, tombstone of James Church in All Saints churchyard (‘MR JAMES CHURCH / formerly of Rochester / AND 22 YEARS MANAGER OF THE / GAS WORKS IN THIS TOWN / WHO DIED MARCH 3 1858 / AGED 67 YEARS / … ALSO OF / MARY / RELICT OF THE ABOVE / WHO DIED AT CHICHESTER[?] FEBRUARY 1870[?]’); P187/2A-4A, date plaque from gas manager’s house.

 

Directories, introductory sections

1848 The Gas Works were established in 1834, at the cost of about £850, and a similar sum was expended in 1847, in making a new gasometer, and in extending the gas pipes to Chipping Hill and the Railway Station. The charge for lights is 10s., and for cooking purposes only 6s. per 1,000 cubic feet.
1855 to 1933 The town is lighted with gas [by a company formed in 1834]

[the latter added in later editions

1863 Newland Street … is connected with Bridge street … These and the few short cross streets, are now well paved and lit with gas. The Gas Works were established in 1834, at the cost of about £850, and a similar sum was expended in 1847, in making a new gasometer, and in extending the gas pipes to Chipping Hill and the Railway Station. The works have now cost about £2,000, raised in £20 shares. Mr Richd Stevens is clerk to the Gas Co., and Mr Robt Robinson, manager of the works.
1937 ‘The town is lighted with electricity’

 

 

Directories: people

Year Manager etc Sec etc.
1839 Butler, Thomas, treasurer, Gas works
1848 Church, James, manager, Gas Works
1855 Church Jas. superintendent of gas works Banks Edward Wilson, clerk to commissioners of land & assessed taxes, & secretary to gas company
1859 Stevens Richard, solicitor clerk to commissioners of land & assessed taxes, secretary to the gas company
1863 Robinson, Robert, manager, Gas Works, Newland Street
1866, 1870, 1874 Witham Gas & Coke Co. (limited) (Richd. Stevens, esq. sec.), Gas works
1878, 1882, 1886, 1890 Witham Gas & Coke Co. Limited (Richd. Stevens, sec.; Robt. Robinson, manager), Gas works
1895, 1899 Witham Gas & Coke Co. Limited (Frank Postle Bawtree sec.; Robt. Robinson manager), Gas works
1902, 1906, 1908, 1910 Witham Gas & Coke Co. Limited (Frank Postle Bawtree, sec.; James Croxall, manager), Gas works
1912, 1914, 1917 Witham Gas & Coke Co. Limited (John Francis Bawtree, sec; James Croxall, manager), Gas works
1922 Witham Gas & Coke Co. Ltd. (Hugh Francis Bawtree, sec.; Jas. Croxall, manager), Gas works
1926 Witham Gas Light & Coke Co. Ltd (Hugh Francis & John Francis Bawtree, joint secs.; Jas.Croxall, manager, Gas works. T N 61
1929 Witham Gas Light & Coke Co. Ltd. (Hugh Francis & John Francis Bawtree, joint secs.; Jas.. Croxall, mngr.), Gas works, High st. T N 61
1933 Witham Gas Light & Coke Co. Ltd. (Andrew Kellard, sec.; A.T.Howard. mngr.), Gas works, High st. T N 61
1937 Witham Gas Light & Coke Co. Ltd; (A. J. Mumford sec.; W J. Mulley, manager), Gas works, High st.

 

Chelmsford Chronicle, 20 November 1835

Witham lighted with Gas

On the [???] inst. the town of Witham was brilliantly lighted with gas for the first time, and much delight was manifested by the inhabitants at the successful conclusion of their undertaking. A band paraded the town during the evening, and an excellent dinner comprising among other good things, two legs of mutton and some fine ribs of beef, which were cooked [???] was partaken of at the works by the trustees and inspectors, W W Luard esq in the chair. The inhabitants are greatly indebted to the exertions of Messrs Butler, Beadel and Banks, under whose immediate superintendence this invaluable improvement to the town has been effected, and great credit is due to Mr Church, manager of the Chelmsford gas works, for his able execution of the work entrusted to him. There are 80 private and 26 public lamps already fixed, a considerable accession to the former is expected’.

 

1841 census, HO 107/343/16, f.18, p.6, High Street

James Church 45 Gas factor not born in Essex
Mary Church 45 not born in Essex
Robert Church 20 Gas factor not born in Essex
John Church 15 Cutler ap not born in Essex
Emily Church 11 not born in Essex
Mary Church 9 mo born in Essex
/
Eliza Shelley 20 Dress maker born in Essex

 

Chelmsford Chronicle, 16 September 1842, page 3

‘Dinner to Thomas Butler, Esq. On Monday last, the shareholders of the Witham Gas Works gave a dinner to Thos Butler Esq, their treasurer, in acknowledgement of his exertions in their behalf, the gas being remarkably good, and an annual dividend of 7½ per cent having been paid during the last two years. On the occasion about twenty gentlemen sat down to an excellent dinner at the Blue Post Inn, when W W Luard, Esq. presided, with E N Banks, Esq. as his vice-chairman, and after the usual routine, the chairman in proposing “The health of the Treasurer of the Gas Works,” presented him on the behalf of the shareholders with a very handsome silver inkstand, bearing the following inscription – Presented by the Shareholders of the Witham Gas Works to Thomas Butler, Esq., Their Treasurer, 12 Sep 1842’.

 

1851 census, HO 107/1783, f.209, p.26, schedule 93, Newland Street

James Church Head M 58 Gas factor employing 2 men born Kent, Rochester
Mary Church Wife M 58 Wife of ditto born Kent, Gravesend
Mary Church Dau 10 Scholar born Essex, Witham
Louisa Ely Granddau 9 Visitor born Essex, Witham
Martha Church Granddau 5 Visitor born Essex, Maldon

 

1861 census, RG 9/1107, f.86, p.159, Gas works

Robert Robinson Head M 36 Gas engineer born America
Emily Robinson Wife M 29 born Kent, Chatham
Leila Ada Robinson Dau 3 born Wales, Paxham
Mary Church Visitor Wid 60 Independent born Kent, Gravesend
Sarah Boltwood Serv 15 House servant born Essex, Wickham

 

1871 census, RG 10/1695, f.38, p.1, Newland Street

Robert Robinson H M 48 Manager of gas works employing 2 men and 1 boy born Canada (British subject)
Clementina Thirza Bentall U 24 Companion housekeeper born Essex, Rayleigh
Arthur Robert Robinson S 6 Scholar born Essex, Witham
Lucy Belsham Robinson S 3 Scholar born Essex, Witham
Clement Marten S 16 mo born Essex, Witham

 

1881 census, RG 11/1809, f.50, p.28, schedule 160, Newland Street, Gas house

Robert Robinson H M 56 Gas works manager empl 4 men born Kinsgston, Upper Canada, British subject
Janette Robinson W M 35 Wife born Essex, Rayleigh
Arthur Robinson S U 16 Son born Essex, Witham
Percy Robinson S 13 Scholar born Essex, Witham
Clement Robinson S 11 Scholar born Essex, Witham
Alice Owers Serv 17 Domestic servant general born Essex, White Notley

 

1891 census, RG 12/1425, f.42, p.24, schedule 159, High Street, Gas House

Robert Robinson Head M 66 Manager of Witham Gas Works born Canada
Olivia Robinson Wife M 4-? born Essex, Rayleigh
Percy B? Robinson Son S 23 Engineer, Civil Marine born Essex, Witham
Ellen Coker Serv S 14 General servant domestic born Essex, Goldhanger

 

1901 census, RG 13/1725, f.44, p.13, schedule 101, High Street, gas works

James Croxall Head M 34 Manager Gas works (worker) born Staffs, Burslem
Frances Croxall Wife M 33 born Staffs, Burslem
Eva Croxall Dau 7 born Staffs, Burslem
Gladys Croxall Dau 5 born Staffs, Biddulph
George R Croxall Son 3 born Staffs, Biddulph

 

 

UDC, 18 December 1911

page 9. Gas Company agrees to lay gas main in Guithavon Road and erect lamps at usual cost per lamp. Agreed to have four.

 

UDC, 29 January 1912

page 14. ‘Petition for gas lamps from residents of Chalks Road and Braintree Road was read also a further petition for lamps from residents of Albert Road’. Discussion. Mr Pinkham proposed Gas Company be asked if would lay gas mains and put up lamps if the Council acceded to petition. Approved nem. con.

 

UDC 26 February 1912

page 20. Gas Company agreed mains in Albert Road and extension in Braintree Road and Chalks Road to be further considered. Accept.

 

UDC, 25 March 1912

page 24. Seven lime trees planted in Collingwood Road to replace dead ones. Write to Gas Company informing them that gas escape in Collingwood Road detrimental to trees, please remedy.

page 27. Ask Gas Company for additional terms for lighting street lamps every night from 1 August to 30 April instead of leaving out five nights every full noon as now.

 

UDC, 29 April 1912, Annual meeting

page 33. Gas Company said roots of trees caused the escape of gas. Told to write and say ‘the gas escaped before the trees were planted’.

page 34. Move that Witham Gas Company be asked to stop closure for full moon and reduce price generally.

page 35. Gas Company agreed to gas mains in Braintree Road and Chalks Lane, on conditions.

 

UDC 30 September 1912

page 67. ‘A runaway horse having knocked a tree down in Collingwood Road, this tree and other defective trees were ordered to be replaced’. Write again to Gas Company about damage from their defective mains.

 

Essex County Chronicle, 5 March 1915

page 8 (see xerox on newspaper file). Witham Gas Company. E M Blyth presided at annual meeting. Increased consumption because of presence of soldiers in Witham. Very satisfactory in spite of increased cost of coal. Showroom built at cost of £95. Dividend 7½ %. W Bindon Blood re-elected chair, Blyth vice chair. T Speakman elected director in place of late Mr Cranfield.

 

UDC 30 October 1916

page 349. Writ from Gas Company against Council for not adhering to agreement (probably about street lighting’. To be a meeting.

 

UDC 27 November 1916

page 355. In Camera: Re Gas Company. Terms in letter accepted.

 

Essex Weekly News, 8 March 1918, page 6

‘Witham Gas Company. Yesterday the 58th annual meeting of the Witham Gas Co was held, Mr E M Blyth, chairman, presiding. The report stated that the business continued to be in a satisfactory condition. Two cottages adjoining the Company’s premises had been purchased to provide additional storage room when required. The directors, after careful consideration, decided to undertake the carting of coal, which they hoped would in future effect a good saving. The balance sheet showed a profit of £435 4s 4d upon an outlay of £5,706 14s 2d, against £583 1s 5d upon an outlay of £5,140 3s 9d last year. The report and balance sheet were adopted and a dividend of 6% declared. Messrs S Abrey, D Brown and N Linley Howlett were re-elected directors and Mr W G Naylor was re-appointed auditor’.

 

Essex Weekly News, 14 March 1919, page 6

Annual meeting of Gas Co on March 6. Mr E M Blyth presided. Dividend of 6 per cent declared [no other info]

 

Braintree and Witham Times, March 1930

Looked for anything on AGM 20 March when several directors gave up, but couldn’t find.

 

Braintree and Witham Times, August 1930

Looked for anything on meeting 1 August but couldn’t find.

 

Braintree and Witham Times, 28 November 1930

page 4 (xerox of whole page is on newspaper file)

col 3. ‘Artful Thief at Witham. Gasworks stoker heavily fined for stealing boots’. Arthur Shelley, young stoker, of Maldon Road. Two pairs of boots. Strenuous denials. Inspector Girt called him ‘an artful and petty thief’’. Magistrates convicted. Fined £10 or 2 months in prison. Bricklayer from London said he’d left boots over weekend. Shelley said he’d bought them in Chelmsford market and had them repaired by Charles Walter Rallings of Mill Lane, Witham. Another prosecutor, Robert Treacher, had lost shoes. Police sergeant Claydon and Supt Whiting. Shelley a single man. Others things missed. No previous convictions and excellent character as workman. So fined and to pay £1 a week. Earned 58s per week.

 

Braintree and Witham Times, March/April 1931

Looked for anything on AGM 30 March when all new directors but couldn’t find.

 

Braintree and Witham Times, 25 February 1932, page 4

Leader about Witham siren. At Gas works and needs 40lb pressure to fire it. Usually police tell gas works to fire it. Perhaps electric would be better.

 

Braintree and Witham Times, 7 April 1932, page 10

James Croxall retired on 31 March after 33 years, reaching age of 65. Gas works remodelled since he came.

 

Braintree and Witham Times, March/April 1932

Looked for anything on AGM 28 March when all new directors but couldn’t find.

 

UDC Public Health Committee, 19 October 1932

page 47. Heard that Gas Company plan to put new gas main in Church Street from White Horse corner to Chalks Lane and through Chalks Lane to Braintree Road. Footpath will be broken up. No notice received.

 

UDC Public Health Committee, 16 November 1932

Gas mains now done in Church Street etc.

 

UDC Public Health Committee, 14 December 1932

page 66. Rev Campbell has suggested ‘that the light now at Chipping Hill immediately opposite the cottage site purchased from Mr Richards, be moved nearer the Pillar Box close to Mr Doole’s shop. This spot is in darkness and formerly a gas lamp was there which was very convenient for persons using the box at night’. Yes.

Also ask Gas Company to ‘move a gas standard now standing on the island in Avenue Road outside Messrs Cooper Taber’s factory, ‘to make room for the electric lamp now on that corner to be removed there to improve lighting there’.

 

UDC Housing Committee, 19 November 1935

page 201. Housing for aged persons. Proceed on revised estimates. Ministry of Health wanted price reducing by £10 per bungalow. Include increasing lavatory space to give enough room for baths in future but not necessary to have baths now. Gas Company to pipe bungalows and lights and coppers free.

 

UDC Water, Highways and Works Committee, 17 June 1936

page 422. East Anglian Electricity Supply Co don’t want to quote for fire alarms. So ask if Crittall’s and Witham Gas Co will agree to use their hooters for next 12 months.

 

UDC Water, Highways and Works Committee, 15 July 1936

page 465. Gas Company agreeable to using hooter at night as fire alarm. Recommend it be retained as such

 

UDC Water, Highways and Works Committee, 18 November 1936

page 583. Ask Gas Company to quote for two lamps in Homefield Road.

 

UDC Water, Highways and Works Committee, 18 November 1936

page 583. Ask Gas Company to quote for two lamps in Homefield Road.

page 584. OK for Gas Company to open Chalks Lane to lay gas mains.

 

UDC Water, Highways and Works Committee, 16 December 1936

page 627. Quotes from Gas Company for two lights at Homefield Road [electricity also seem to have quoted but gas a bit less and accepted]

 

UDC Housing Committee, 15 March 1937

page 712. Accept offer from Gas Company to ‘carcase’ Church Street houses (52 of them, probably east side) and fix lighting in each room with point for cooking, at no cost to Council.

 

Braintree and Witham Times, 12 January 1939, page 1

Advert. ‘The Witham Gas Light and Coke Company Ltd. invite you to a further series of Cookery Demonstrations at the British Legion Hall, Mill Lane, Witham commencing at 3 p.m., Thursday, January 26th. Menu for first week will be puddings for all seasons’.

 

Essex Weekly News, 5 October 1945, page 14

‘WITHAM GAS LIGHT AND COKE COMPANY, LTD., ECONOMY IN THE USE OF GAS.

The Company respectfully begs to urge on all consumers the imperative need for the utmost economy in the use of gas from now and during the coming winter.

With such co-operation it should be possible to meet all reasonable demands, but otherwise it is more than likely that pressures may again have to be reduced.

DON’T WASTE GAS. TURN OFF THAT TAP.

S F Gardiner, Engineer and Manager, 2nd October 1945’.

 

From ERO online catalogue

ERO D/DU 56/5

Estate Auction book (name of auctioneers on cover in Messrs Coote and Abrey of Witham). A few entries relate to auctions of shares in the … ‘Witham Gas Company’, (p. 127) … 1858-1888 9

T/P 175/10/3 Sale catalogue of shop and dwelling house in Newland St., Witham; cottages in Wickham Bishops; shares in Witham Gas Co., 1905
D/F 27/7

Minute book of meetings of directors and shareholders of Witham Gas Light and Coke Company (see separate doc for notes)

D/P 30/24/20 Special district rate for lighting by gas
1857-1859       D/P 30/24/16 Special district rate for lighting by gas.
1860-1868       D/P 30/24/17 Special district rate for lighting by gas
1863-1866       D/P 30/24/18 Special district rate for lighting by gas
1867                D/P 30/24/19 Special district rate for lighting by gas

 

Gas company, Transco records

From A2A web site, March 2004

 

Reference Code: EA:WIG. WITHAM GAS LIGHT AND COKE COMPANY

Creation dates: 1926 – 1949. 2 FILES. Held at: Transco plc.

Administrative History

Formed in 1860. On Nationalisation in 1949 the undertaking became part of the Chelmsford Group of the Ipswich Division of EGB

EA:WIG/A/M/1

Minute Book of Directors’ meetings 8 Oct 1926 – 27 Apr 1949. Creation dates: 1926 – 1949.

EA:WIG/E/F/1

Three black and white photographs of new gas holder foundation. Creation dates: 1948.

 

Reference Code: EA:BIG. BRITISH GAS LIGHT COMPANY LTD (CENTRAL OFFICE)

Creation dates: 1824 – 1949. Held at: Transco plc

Administrative History

The British Gas Light Company was formed in 1824 with the objective “.. to contract with and supply Light to Towns or Places that may require Gas.” The first permanent chairman was Jacob George Wrench, appointed in May 1825. In 1829 an AoP was obtained which incorporated the London station and effectively separated the London undertaking from the rest of the company’s undertakings. The incorporated London company operated mainly in the east end of London until 1852 when it was purchased by the Commercial Gas Co. Lighting contracts were obtained in Limehouse, Whitechapel and Mile End. Offers to purchase the works of the Poplar GLCo and the Ratcliff GLCo came to nothing, although after the 1829 Act was obtained, the Co extended its area of supply to districts previously supplied by the Imperial GC and the chartered Gas Light and Coke Co.

After the Act of 1829, the unincorporated part of the company (known as the Provincial Co) established by Deed of Settlement operated seven stations at Norwich, Hull, Trowbridge, the Potteries, Holywell, Ayr and Clonmel in Ireland. In 1857 it was incorporated as a Joint Stock Co with Limited Liability and then in 1924 the constitution was altered by the substitution of a Memorandum and Articles of Association for the original Deed of Settlement. The headquarters of the company were originally in George Yard, Lombard St, London until 1922 when they moved to No.2, The Abbey Garden, Westminster.

The most important stations of the British GLCo were at Norwich and Hull, both purchased in 1825. The company purchased the Norwich Gas Light Company (formed in 1820) which provided oil-gas and operated from a works in the parish of St Stephen. It also established a major coal gas works at Hull, on land at Sculcoates. In 1830 the Company decided to convert the Norwich works to coal gas manufacture and to expand to a new site at Bishop Bridge. By 1853 another new works was completed at St Martin-at-Palace (See EA:NOU). In 1883 the BGLCo erected chemical works at Great Yarmouth, the raw by-products being conveyed from Norwich by river. The Hull works operated alongside the works of the Kingston upon Hull GLCo and later the East Hull Gas Co (See NE:HUB). The works at Ayr were sold to a private owner in 1832 and the undertaking at Clonmel was sold in 1895. The station at the Staffordshire Potteries was sold to Stoke on Trent Borough Council in 1922.

The British GLCo was unique in that it was not only an undertaker in its own right but it also eventually had a controlling interest in 21 gas companies. By 1949 it had 18 subsidiary undertakings in the Eastern GB as well as operating 10 stations of its own, including Aylsham (1933), Bletchley(Fenny Stratford) (1928), Brandon (1935), Chatteris (1938), Diss (1935), Downham Market (1932), Harleston (1928), Mildenhall (1936), Norwich (1857), Thetford, and Wickham. (See EA:EA). Under the Gas Act 1948, special arrangements were made to transfer local undertakings to the relevant Area Gas Board concerned. The records of the Limited Co were retained within the Eastern Gas Board.

[earlier files not noted as not relevant to Witham]

EA:BIG/A/M/11

Minute Book A of the Court of Directors 8 Jan 1930 – 1 Nov 1933

EA:BIG/A/M/12

Minute Book B of the Court of Directors 15 Nov 1933 – 29 Sep 1937

EA:BIG/A/M/13

Minute Book C of the Court of Directors 13 Oct 1937 – 24 Jun 1942

EA:BIG/A/M/14

Minute Book D of the Court of Directors 15 Jul 1942 – 10 Dec 1947

EA:BIG/A/M/15

Minute Book E of the Court of Directors 21 Jan 1948 – 30 Apr 1949

EA:BIG/A/M/16

Minute Book S of the Works Committee Meetings 22 Oct 1930 – 12 Aug 1942

EA:BIG/A/M/17

Minute Book T of the Works Committee Meetings 23 Sep 1942 – 27 Apr 1949

EA:BIG/F/R/1

Bundle of miscellaneous receipts. Creation dates: 1948 – 1949

EA:BIG/L/T/1

British Gas Light Company Ltd and subsidiary companies Register of Deeds (Aylsham to Witham undertakings) 10 Oct 1849 – 14 Aug 1947

EA:BIG/P/L/1

Salaries and Emoluments Register with details of employees including Date of Birth, date entering service and wage details. Creation dates: 1930 – 1949

EA:BIG/P/P/1

Register of Pensions and Allowances, British Gas Light Company, 1 Jul 1930 – 25 Jun 1947


 


Email exchange with National Gas Archive, Transco, March 2004 (latest first)

To: Janet Gyford <janet@gyford.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Mar 2004 12:46:04 +0100
Dear Ms Gyford,
I am sorry for the delay in contacting you, however I was unable to attend to your enquiry last week. I have now checked the trade directories which list the Witham Gas Light and Coke Co. as a subsidiary of the British Gas Light Co. from 1934. I have checked the minute book for years 1933-34 but can find no mention of this apart from a note of a loan from the BGLC for £3000 in February 1933. The Deeds register mentioned has two pages of deeds pertaining to Witham. I have looked at the plans which show very little other than a dotted line showing the boundary of the site they do not indicate the layout of the plant etc. and I do not think they would be of interest to you. I f you would care to send a postal address I would be prepared to photocopy the pages from the deed register and the photographs free of charge as we normally provide up to 10 pages free of charge.

To: Janet Gyford <janet@gyford.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Mar 2004 16:17:02 +0000
From: archive@uktransco.com
Message sent by Elaine Brison
Janet,
If you don’t select the ‘catalogue in full’ button on A2A then you will just get entries that include the search term you used. I have attached our list for EA:WIG
(See attached file: EA Witham GLCC.doc)
I am now away until Monday but will then look at the deed register and plans (these may be very similar/duplicates) and let you know what I think its worth having copies of and therefore costs. I’ll also look for details of the BGLC acquisition of Witham in the trade directories and let you know what I can find out.
I will contact you again on Monday
Elaine
National Gas Archive
Europa Court, Europa Boulevard
Warrington WA5 7TN
Tel: 01925 425741
Fax: 01925 425748
email: enquiries@gasarchive.org
www.gasarchive.org

From Janet Gyford
<janet@gyford.com>
To: archive@uktransco.com
cc:
17/03/04 12:06 Subject: Re: witham gas light and coke company
Hello Elaine
Many thanks for replying so quickly.
I can’t find any individual EA:WIG references on the A2A site (for instance about the photos you mention), so if you had a list that would be most helpful.
Would it be feasible to order some photocopies by post, e.g. of the relevant pages in the Deeds register EA:BIG/L/T/1, and of the plans you mention in EA/SA/WIG?
As far as I can tell from the company records at the PRO, the British Gas Light Company Ltd started to take over the Witham company in 1930 – if there is any more precise information about this anywhere, it would be useful.
Many thanks again
Janet
At 09:54 17/03/04 +0000, you wrote:
Message sent by Elaine Brison
Dear Ms Gyford,
thank you for your enquiry re Witham Gas light and Coke Company we do not have any further records for the actual Gas Light and Coke Company but do have further records pertaining to the Witham undertaking after Nationalisation of the Gas Industry in 1949 as below, ‘Block plans’ are very simple outlines of where buildings stood on the site:
EA:EA/SA/WIG WITHAM
ESTATE & PROPERTY
EA:EA/SA/WIG/E/E | ESTATE DRAWINGS
1 Block and floor plan for 86 High Street Drawing. No. S475. 1957
2 Block plan of gas holder site, London Road Drawing No. S495/1A. 1984
3 Block plan gas holder site Drawing No. S495/2. 1985

With regards to the references you found on A2A the EA/BIG/L/T/1 is a deeds register which means this does not include the deeds its self but is simple a log book of all deeds created usually giving the names of the parties involved and the land/purpose

The EA:WIG refs are fairly self explanatory – photographs being photographs though I have to say ‘gas holder foundations’ are not very interesting being little more that a hole in the ground. The minute book is a bound volume that holds the official record of meetings held, usually listing those present and itemising matters discussed. The archives are avbailable for viewing by appointment and copying facilities are available at a cost of 20p photocopy (A3 & A4) and £5 per plan copy, Laser prints are also available of photographs at £4 per copy, all copyright lies with the National Gas Archive.
I hope this has been of some use,
Elaine Brison
Assistant Archivist
Janet Gyford
janet@gyford.com

To: enquiries@gasarchive.org
16/03/04 12:49 Subject: witham gas light and coke company
Hello gas archive
I see from the A2A web site that you have some records of the Witham Gas Light and Coke Company in Essex (your ref EA:WIG). Would it be possible for you to tell me a bit more about what these documents comprise, and also whether you have anything else about that company ? I also see Witham referred to under the British Company (EA:BIG/L/T/1) and would be interested in that too.
Many thanks
Janet Gyford


GAS WORKS in ESSEX Locations and Key Dates
from John Horne’s gasworks gazetteer, supplied by Michael Leach of Essex Arch and Hist Soc, March 2004

Gasworks which were for the exclusive supply of particular private houses, institutions or factories are listed elsewhere. Most of the Essex gasworks trading in May 1949 were vested in the Eastern Gas Board, the remainder (already owned by the Gas Light & Coke Company), becoming part of the North Thames Gas Board.

Corrections and additional information would be welcome. Please contact John Horne on 023 8046 3139. This version updated 8-7-2001 [Address given for him by Michael Leach: Heathermount, Moor Hill Road, West End, Southampton SO30 3AW. ]

WITHAM, High Street/Mill Lane/Roman Road, Essex n45-11, TL 8241 1542
[1835. Gas plant supplied by the Neath Abbey Ironworks; drawings held by the Glamorgan Archive Service. Glamorgan archives claim in email 29 March to JG that these plans are actually Witham in Somerset; John Horne is investigating]

Richard Stevens was listed as Secretary in the 1859 and 1867 P.O.Directories. He was also a Solicitor and Clerk to the Commissioners of Land and Taxes.

1860: Formation of Witham Gas Light & Coke Company.

In 1870 and 1886 Richard Stevens was secretary. Frank Postle Bawtree was Secretary in 1900. Robert Robinson was manager in 1870 and 1900 (Kelly’s Directory) but GWD&S lists J.Croxall as Manager in 1900.

In 1929 James Croxall was Manager. The Joint Secretaries were Hugh and John Fras  Bawtree.

Control acquired by the British Gas Light & Coke Co.Ltd.

In 1937 W.J.Mulley was Manager. The make that year was 23.8m from 1,504 tons of coal.

By 1948 S.F.Gardiner had taken over as local Engineer & Manager and the make was 36m. Gardiner also managed Halstead and other BGL subsidiaries

1950    Gasmaking ceased during the latter part of the year.

WITHAM HOLDER STN., Essex n45-12
The Chelmsford to Colchester main passed through Witham.
The holder(s) had been demolished by October 1985.


 

Street lighting by gas and electricity


STREET LIGHTING IIN WITHAM BY GAS AND ELECTRICITY
Notes of meetings of the public bodies concerned

See also the separate report on gas in general

If not from a newspaper, the items from the Witham Board of Health, the Witham Urban District Council (UDC), and the Witham Gas Company are from the original documents in the Essex Record Office. The Board minutes are ERO A5405, the Council or Committee minutes are ERO D/UWi, and the Gas Company minutes are D/F 27/7/1



Board of Health meeting, 25 January 1890 (reported in Essex County Chronicle, 31 January 1890, page 3)
Mr Mead of Chelmsford had inspected the lamps. Thought many were wasteful of gas, burned more than they should. Recommended different burners and frequent cleaning. Committee to meet gas company.

Board of Health minutes, 8 March 1890 (also report in Essex County Chronicle, 14 March 1890, page 6)
Deputation from Witham Ratepayers Association attend to ‘protest against the idea of lighting the town with oil and strongly urge the Board to postpone the question until the coming vacancies are refilled’. Mr Davies stated the views of the deputation. Mr Brown as proposer agreed to defer the matter till the first meeting after the election. Amendment proposed by Mr Speakman – do not proceed with oil lighting – accept Gas Company’s terms – carried.

Witham Ratepayers’ meeting, 10 March 1890 (Essex County Chronicle, 14 March 1890, page 6
Long report. Two hundred householders, following circular by Ratepayer’s association, to receive rules etc. drawn up by Committee. They proposed support for three candidates for Board of Health. Mr Wakelin objected that there weren’t any farmers, and that members couldn’t be bound to support specific candidates. Latter was amended to ‘seek every legitimate means’ but lots abstained. Original problem was the lighting.

Chelmsford, 14 April 1890 (reported in review of year, Essex County Chronicle, 26 December 1890, page 6).
‘Inauguration of the electric light at Chelmsford. The lights were switched on by the Mayoress (Miss Brown) and the Ex-Mayoress (Mrs Chancellor)

Witham Gas Co., 11 October 1907 (D/F 27/7/1)
Letter from clerk of Urban District Council ‘asking that all the public lamps be lit every night from 15th August to 15th April (instead of 1 Aug to end April minus “moonlight” nights as at present)’. Mr Croxall said this means addition of 40 long extra nights compared to 30 short ones taken off. Also think inhabitants would complain if not continued till 1 May. Agreed to write saying would need rebate if so.

Witham Gas Co., 10 January 1908 (D/F 27/7/1)
No reply from UDC but Chairman (Mr W B Blood) said as clerk of UDC, that the Council had no remarks and matters would be left as at present.

UDC, January, 1908 (Essex Weekly News, 31 January)
‘A memorial signed by 13 residents in Maldon Road asked the Council to erect lamps in that locality. Mr Bawtree moved that the request be granted. The Chairman [Philip Hutley] said the town was not in a position to spend money on more street lamps. Motion defeated by 4 to 3’.

Witham Gas Co., 30 July 1909 (D/F 27/7/1)
Urban District Council wanted three additional lamps in Maldon Road. Agreed.

Witham Gas Co., 8 October 1909 (D/F 27/7/1)
Lamps in Maldon Road had been erected.

Witham Gas Co., 11 February 1910 (D/F 27/7/1)
Considered moving lamp near the Railway Bridge, left to Urban District Council and Mr Croxall to decide where to put it in more convenient place. 

Witham Gas Co., 14 December 1911 (D/F 27/7/1)
Urban District Council had asked for main and lamps in Guithavon Road. Agreed, usual payment.

UDC, 18 December 1911
pages 7-8. Clerk to write to Witham Cartage Co, because the board on their manager’s house in Maldon Road obstructed light of gas lamp. Be good enough to move it.
page 9. Gas Company agrees to lay gas main in Guithavon Road and erect lamps at usual cost per lamp. Agreed to have four.
‘Petition for gas lamps from residents of Chalks Road and Braintree Road’, refer to next meeting.

Witham Gas Co., 11 January 1912 (D/F 27/7/1)
Urban District Council wanted 4 lamps in Guithavon Road. [?doesn’t give decision]

UDC, 29 January 1912
page 14. ‘Petition for gas lamps from residents of Chalks Road and Braintree Road was read also a further petition for lamps from residents of Albert Road’. Discussion. Mr Pinkham proposed Gas Company be asked if would lay gas mains and put up lamps if the Council acceded to petition. Approved nem. con.

UDC 26 February 1912, page 20.
Gas Company agreed mains in Albert Road and extension in Braintree Road and Chalks Road to be further considered. Accept.

Witham Gas Co., 4 March 1912, Emergency meeting (D/F 27/7/1)
‘Electric Lighting. The Secretary announced that Mr Girling of Maldon had had an interview with him about a proposed Electric Lighting company for Witham, that Mr Girling was anxious to meet the Directors and explain the matter to them.’ Agreed. Engineer to be asked to attend.

Witham Gas Co., 14 March 1912 (D/F 27/7/1)
‘The Chairman asked Mr H P Girling of Maldon to explain Electric Lighting Scheme.
Mr Girling made a statement giving details of what had been done at Maldon and other towns of similar size and explained the proposed scheme for Witham producing provisional plans and stating the amount of capital required and the general idea for working the Electric Lighting Supply. He suggested that a separate Company would have to be started, giving if desired, the Gas Company Shareholders an option to take shares with possibly the same Directorate as the wish of the promoters was to act in no antagonistic spirit with the Gas Company’. Questions asked and discussion. Further meeting to be held to consider.

Witham Gas Co., 19 March 1912 (D/F 27/7/1)
‘Mr E W Smith [engineer] made a statement as to Mr Girling’s interview with the Directors and informed them that he had come to the conclusion that it would be unwise for the Directors to attempt to run the Electric Lighting Supply’. Discussion.
Proposed to thank Mr Girling for his statement and say Directors ‘cannot see their way to incur any responsibility with regard to the institution of Electric Lighting at Witham’.

UDC, 25 March 1912
page 27. Ask Gas Company for additional terms for lighting street lamps every night from 1 August to 30 April instead of leaving out five nights every full moon as now.

Witham Gas Co., 11 April 1912 (D/F 27/7/1)
Manager reported as to extension of mains in Braintree Road and Chalks Lane. Agreed to tell Urban District Council that willing to extend main in Braintree Road and Chalks Lane provided Council willing to pay for 4 or more lamps. 

UDC, 29 April 1912, Annual meeting
page 34. Move that Witham Gas Company be asked to stop closure for full moon and reduce price generally 

Witham Gas Co., 9 May 1912 (D/F 27/7/1)
UDC asked Company to have the street lamps lighted every night from 1 Aug to 30 April ‘instead of leaving out 5 nights at every full moon and also that the charge per lamp be reduced’
Secretary to write that ‘Company’s assessment [presumably rates] more than doubled’ and price of coal risen, so can’t reduce and compares very favourably with other places. Can’t increase number of nights. If UDC wished them lighted, should pay in proportion.

UDC Road Committee, 28 May 1912, page 69
Re Gas lamps. Agreed three to be erected in Braintree Rd, two in Chalks Rd, two in Albert Rd.
‘Agreement in reference to the installation and supply of electric light. Mr Girling (Engineer) and Messrs Crompton’s representative attended and the latter fully explained the proposed scheme and pointed out that the contractors mainly required the permission of the Council to break the Streets to lay the necessary mains and erect the poles. The agreement was then read and the various clauses explained.’

Witham Gas Co., 19 July 1912 (D/F 27/7/1)
Urban District Council asked for reduction in price again. No action at present. 

UDC Waterworks Committee, 26 July 1912, page 76
Met to consider question of ‘letting the old Waterworks buildings to Messrs Crompton and Co Ltd for an electric generating station’. Recommended opening negotiations for letting Buildings.

UDC, 29 July 1912
page 53.‘Captain Abrey’s proposition, seconded by Mr Hubbard, that lamp post opposite the Veterinary Surgeon’s be removed, and placed in centre of the crossing opposite the George Inn with a view to obviate the dangers to vehicular traffic, was lost’.
page 55. Letter from Miss H E Chalk ‘complaining of annoyance cause her by Lamppost in Braintree Road being placed immediately in front of her window’ agree to remove it. 

Witham Gas Co., 22 October 1912 (D/F 27/7/1)
New workshop and showroom almost complete.
‘The reduction of the Street Lighting which had taken place pursuant to the Home Office’s and Chief Constable’s notices was considered’. Agreed to write to Urban District Council that Company ‘not allowed to light the full number of Street Lamps’ as in agreement. 

UDC 26 October 1914
page 219. Letter from Witham Gas Company. Orders from Home Office and Chief Constable for Essex, not allowed to light full number of street lamps as in the agreement with the Council.

UDC 13 September 1915, extraordinary meeting
page 279. ‘In view of the recent and frequent visits of enemy aircraft the lighting of any street lamps was considered a source of danger’. Clerk to tell Gas Company not to light any in future.

14 September 1915, page 597, D/UWi 1/4/2 Urban District Council Letter Book
‘Dear Sir
At a meeting of the Council held last night the matter of street lighting was discussed, and it was resolved that in view of the recent and frequent visits of enemy Aircraft the lighting of any street lamps was considered a source of danger, and as a precautionary measure I was instructed to give you notice that as from this date no public street lamps were to be lighted. W Bindon Blood to Mr J Croxall, manager Witham Gas Light and Coke Co Ltd, Witham.

Witham Gas Co., 18 July 1916 (D/F 27/7/1) 18 July 1916
‘The Manager brought up the question of Street Lighting and the Witham Urban District Council and stated that the Chelmsford Town Council had allowed the Chelmsford Gas Coy 20 % on their outlay’. Decided to make a claim on Witham UDC. 

12 September 1916, page 710, D/UWi 1/4/2 Urban District Council Letter Book
On 22 October 1914, Gas Company told Council not allowed to light full number of lights. ‘Since then have charged for what lighted. Since September 1915 … no lamps have been lighted and no charge …’ Gas Company now want compensation. To Secretary of UDC Clerks Association

Witham Gas Co., 17 October 1916 (D/F 27/7/1)
Correspondence with Witham Urban District Council re ‘non-lighting of lamps’. Decided to take Counsel’s opinion. 

Witham Gas Co., 27 October 1916 (D/F 27/7/1)
Discussion about Urban District Council. Letter sent forthwith and proceedings taken. 

UDC 30 October 1916 page 349.
Writ from Gas Company against Council for not adhering to agreement (probably about street lighting). To be a meeting.
Letter from Mr F Hayward suggesting ‘band of luminous paint … round the lamp posts and telegraph posts that stand upon the paths edge with a view to preventing accidents’. Forward to authorities concerned.

UDC 27 November 1916
page 355. Letters from Post Office and Gas Company agreeing poles and lamps painted at Council’s expense. 

Witham Gas Co., 7 November 1916 (D/F 27/7/1)
Deputation to meet Urban District Council.
Letter from UDC ‘as to painting the Gas Standards with Luminous paint’. Agreeable if at expense of UDC.

Witham Gas Co., 14 November 1916 (D/F 27/7/1)
Joint Conference with UDC representatives.
For the company, Mr E M Blyth, Mr W E Shee and Mr David Brown plus secretary and manager.
UDC represented by Mr P Hutley (chair), Mr W Pinkham and Mr A W Garrett. Also Deputy clerk and surveyor.
Discussion. Agreement about liability and payment.

Witham Gas Co., 19 November 1918 (D/F 27/7/1)
Urban District Council had asked that ’50 % of the normal number of lamps be relit’.
Write and agree if UDC pay ‘contract price of £2 5s per lamp for the 50% lighted and half the £65 13s per annum for the 50 % not lighted’.

UDC Roads Committee, 18 January 1919, page 260
Letter from Witham Gas Light and Coke Co Ltd, terminating agreement because of increased costs. Resolved to ask for details.

Witham Gas Co., 21 January 1919 (D/F 27/7/1)
Complaints received ‘as to lamps being unlighted for five nights when Moon was full’. Discussed.’ It will now be unnecessary to light the Lamps during the month of August, owing to the Daylight Savings Bill’ Write to Urban District Council suggesting date for commencement be altered from 1 August to 1 September and then continuous lighting from then to 30 April ‘as this would be of a greater benefit to the public, although the Lamps would have to be lighted 9 nights more than under the present arrangement’.

Witham Gas Co., 20 February 1919 (D/F 27/7/1)
UDC agreed to lighting proposal. ‘The letter also suggested automatic lighting of the Public Lamps’. To be considered.

Witham Gas Co., 15 April 1919 (D/F 27/7/1)
Public Gas Lamp standards to be painted this year.

UDC 30 June 1919 (reported in EWN 4 July 1919)
Witham, Gas Co wrote giving six months notice to terminate at Xmas the agreement for lighting street lamps ‘owing to the considerable increased price of coal and labour’. Mr Pinkham said Gas Co ‘had done very well out of the Urban Council during the War’, and surprised. ‘The Gas Co. was about 50 years behind the times when compared with other towns of equal size with Witham; and he suggested that self-lighters to the lamps would effect an economy in gas’. Letter referred to Roads Cttee.

Witham Gas Co., 28 July 1919, (D/F 27/7/1)
Letter from South Yorkshire Coal Supplies Committee, owing to strike no coal could be delivered. Urging strict economy. Notice to be sent out to consumers. Difficulty in fixing price of street lighting at present because of strike. 

UDC 28 July 1919 (reported in EWN 1 Aug 1919)
Witham Gas Co wrote offering to light as many lights as necessary in town at £4 per lamp from 1 Sept to April 30. Couldn’t see far ahead though. Present contract £2 5s a lamp. Referred to lighting committee.

UDC 25 Aug 1919 (reported in EWN 29 Aug 1919)
Roads Committee had asked the Gas Co to submit terms. H F Bawtree was sec to W Gas Co said couldn’t reply ‘until the coal question and the labour market were in a more settled state’. Gas Co only limited supply of coal. So couldn’t undertake definitely to light 50 per cent of lamps. Suggested corner ones only. Chair said contract price till Xmas £2 5s per lamp and after that £4 per lamp. ‘Mr Pinkham asked if the Committee had yet considered the possibility of lighting the streets by electricity’. Reply that first wanted information about gas. ‘Mr S C Richardson stated that the time had come when the Council should prepare to make a stand against the Witham Gas Co. which was a very good paying concern. To put up the prices of street lamps from £2 5s to £4 was a serious matter. On the proposition of Mr W Pinkham, the whole question was referred to a Committee of the Council, when electricity and gas will be considered for street lighting’.

UDC Roads Committee 3 September 1919, page 7
Question of lighting public lamps considered. Letter from Suffolk Electricity Supply Co Ltd read. Considerable discussion. Resolved to write to ‘various well known firms’ asking for schemes and estimates for ‘such lighting’. Adopted

UDC, full Council, 29 September 1919, page 61
Electric Lighting.
Letters from Messrs Crompton, Mr H P Girling and Suffolk Electricity Supply Co read. Referred to Roads Cttee

UDC 29 Sept 1919 (reported in EWN 3 Oct 1919)
‘The Council received two approximate estimates for providing the town with electricity – viz. Messrs Crompton and Co., Chelmsford, omitting street illumination, £9,000: and the Suffolk Electric Co., who proposed making the town a centre, with power from Braintree and underground wires, £16,000.- Mr Girling, of Maldon, wrote suggesting that he be appointed consulting engineer for the scheme at a fee of £50, to be refunded if he were employed to superintend the installation. – Referred to the Road Committee.’

UDC Roads Committee, 30 September 1919, page 112
Letter from Suffolk Electricity Supply Co Ltd. ‘relative to proposed installation of Electric Light’. To be asked to send a representative to Witham to explain. Adopted

UDC, full Council, 21 October 1919, page 64
Street lighting
Mr Napier Prentice, Secretary of Suffolk Electricity Supply Co Ltd. attended.
Questions.  Replies.
Advisable to install system of overhead conductors to distribute electricity.
Council could do work, or if Council decided not to go into Electricity Supply for selves, Company could do work.
In view of ‘proposed developments for Electricity Supply a Generating Station should not be built at Witham’ but if his company did supply they’d bring it from Braintree by overhead wires. In near future his company would probably promote a large Power Stn in Essex.
Cost of installation would be approximately £1,000 for 104 lights, and interest, upkeep, electricity etc. would be £3 per annum per lamp.
Clerk to ascertain ‘whether Messrs Crittall were anticipating installing Electric Light at their new Factory, and would be willing to undertake the lighting of the Town’.

Essex Weekly News, 24 October 1919, page 3, col 5
UDC met for two hours in committee, to consider various matters including the proposal for electric lighting.

UDC, full Council, 18 November 1919, page 69
Street lighting. Letters from Suffolk Electricity Supply Co Ltd. confirming the statements of their Secretary at the Oct meeting, read.
Letter from Crittall Manufacturing Co ‘stating that they were not in a position to supply Electric Light to the Council’
Clerk to write to Suffolk Electricity Supply Co Ltd. that if prepared to state definitely that liability of Council for lighting their 104 street lamps with Electric Light’ would not exceed £3 per lamp per annum, Council willing to proceed. Gas agreement expires Xmas next. To write to them for terms.

UDC 18 November, in Essex Weekly News, 21 November 1919, page 3 ‘The lighting question and other matters were dealt with in committee’.

Witham Gas Co., 2 December 1919 (D/F 27/7/1)
Street lighting discussed. Proposal of scale which would alter if price of coal fell. Write to Urban District Council and point out increase cost of labour and materials.

UDC Roads Committee, 16 December 1919, page 21
Street lighting. Letter from Witham Gas Light and Coke Co Ltd. Willing to light the town or as many lamps as required at £4 per lamp, to be lighted from 1 September to 30 April inclusive, and usual 6 lamps only to be lighted between 1 May and 31 August. Charge would reduce if cost of coal fell. If any lights not lighted for any cause out of control of Gas Co ‘the same proportion of the £65 per annum now paid to be paid for such unlighted lamps’. Resolved to enter agreement for one year. Effort to be made to modify the £65 or proportion on the basis of minimum of 80 lamps.
Letter from Suffolk Electricity Supply Co Ltd read, confirming charge per lamp per annum ‘at £3 provided they carry out a general supply in Witham’. Resolved to accept the terms, the supply to be available from 25 December 1920 with a minimum of 100 lamps. Adopted

UDC 16 Dec 1919 (reported in EWN 19 Dec 1919)
Witham Gas Co ‘wrote stating now prepared to light the street lamps at £4 a lamp from Sept 1 to April 30, six lamps to be lighted from May 1 to Aug 31’. Could reduce to £3 15 if price of coal for gas be reduced by 10 s a ton. These figures the minimum be of cost of labour and materials. There were 102 street lamps. Road Cttee recommend acceptance for one year. Mr Pinkham hesitant because of cost. But adopted.
‘The Suffolk Electricity Co wrote that they would be prepared to light the street lamps at Witham for £3 per lamp per year, provided they carried out a general electric supply at Witham. The Chairman said the Council could not undertake any responsibility in regard to a general electricity supply at Witham, and that clause would have to be deleted: but otherwise the Council would accept the offer of street lamps at £3 a year each. The Council agreed. ‘It was ordered to be entered on the minutes that Captain Abrey did not vote on either of these questions affecting street lighting’ [note by JG: Captain Abrey was a director of the Gas Company]

UDC Roads Committee, 10 January 1920, page 25
Decided ‘Lamps not to be lighted’ be: One opposite the Red Lion, High Street. One opposite Chignall House in Collingwood Road
Lamps to be Lighted: One opposite the Bungalow, Collingwood Road. One opposite St Johns Terrace, Church Street. Adopted

UDC, full Council, 13 January 1920, page 76
Letter from Suffolk Electricity Supply Company, now East Anglian Electricity Ltd, read. Agreement would be considered.

Witham Gas Co., 30 January 1920 (D/F 27/7/1)
Discussion of Urban District Council proposals. Not agreed.

Witham Gas Co., 19 February 1920 (D/F 27/7/1)
Agreement on street lighting (no dets).

UDC, full Council, 31 May 1920, page 97
Letters from East Anglian Electricity Ltd. Difficulty in obtaining material. So couldn’t undertake supply of electric light in Witham till next year. So not to terminate agreement with Gas Company this year. 

Witham Gas Co., 24 June 1920 (D/F 27/7/1)
Re price of Gas. £1,000 extra may be required in coming year. Agreed to increase price from 5s 8d to 7s per 1,000 c ft.
To write to Urban District Council asking for increase of 10s per lamp as from 25 Dec 1920.

20 August 1920, EWN, page 7
Story about explosion of oil lamp in house in Mill Lane, ‘the bursting of an oil lamp which was being carried upstairs’ by Mrs Emma Thompson, which fatally burnt her daughter Elizabeth Anna Shelley aged 11, who was in front of her. A small paraffin lamp.

UDC Roads Committee, 10 August 1920, page 59
Application of Manager of Witham Gas Co, re number of lights during coming season. Resolved same as before.

UDC 30 August 1920, in EWN 3 Sept, page 3
On recommendation of lighting committee, decided to light same no of lamps as last year. 

UDC, full Council, 25 October 1920
Letter from East Anglian Electricity Ltd. Company at present negotiating with Railway Company re way-leave and for permission to put High Tension Line along railway Braintree to Witham.

UDC Coal Emergency Committee, 29 October 1920, page 72
Resolved Mr A F Claydon be asked to undertake duties of Overseer ‘during the present emergency’; salary to await what work carrying out of regulations and orders would involve. Mr Croxall (co-opted) [manager of Gas Works] said that under directions of Clerk, he had reduced number of lamps lighted to 10, ‘at the most essential points’. Confirmed by Committee.

UDC, full Council, 20 December 1920, page 125
Electric light. Letter from East Anglian Electricity Ltd. Company being reorganised. Appealing to public for capital. So not possible to obtain capital and complete line to light Witham by midsummer next.

UDC Roads Committee, 4 January 1921, page 78
Street Lighting considered ‘in view of the determination of the present agreement with the Gas Company at midsummer next’. Decided to recommend that ‘the Street Lamps be lighted only at junctions of roads and dangerous corners, which would necessitate about 16 lamps’.

UDC Emergency Coal Committee, 9 April 1921, page 95
Appointed Mr A F Claydon Coal officer. ‘It was resolved that summer time lighting of street lamps be resorted to forthwith’. Resolved that permits for ‘normal consumption of gas be granted to essential industries, the situation to be reviewed if necessary’. Also permits for coal to ‘be issued for steam rolling and ploughing having regard to the situation and that the granting of permits for coal in cases of sickness and emergency be left to the discretion of the coal officer’.

UDC Roads Committee, 7 May 1921, page 100
Gas Co wished to open certain road for new mains. Agreed.
‘In view of the early termination of the agreement with the Gas Company for Street Lighting, the Clerk was directed to ascertain on what terms the Gas Company would light lamps at dangerous corners etc to the number of sixteen’. 

Witham Gas Co., 19 May 1921 (D/F 27/7/1)
Letter from Urban District Council re street lighting, asking for Company’s terms for lighting 16 of the public lamps at the expiration of the present agreement in June. Agreed to quote terms to be subject of new agreement, i.e. £5 per lamp if 16 lighted, £4 10s per lamp if 32 lamps, £4 per lamp if 52 or more, and all unlighted ones to be paid for at 2s per month per lamp for the eight lighting months.

 Witham Gas Co., 16 June 1921 (D/F 27/7/1)
Urban District Council would not agree terms for lighting. Agreed to leave letter on table.

UDC, full Council, 25 July 1921, page 150
Electric lighting. Letter from Messrs A S Payle and F S Leatherdale, ‘asking permission to erect overhead Electric Mains in the Town with a view to installing Plant for supplying the Town with Electric light’. Clerk to write for details and their financial position.

UDC, full Council, 20 or 29 August 1921, page 154, also reported in Essex Weekly News, 2 September, page 3
‘Mr E Smith asked whether any more lamps would be lit in the town – Mr Pinkham said they had 104 lamps; 52 had been lit, and they had to pay a retaining fee for the other 52. The Council had got to make up their minds whether they could afford any lamps at all. It was decided to ask the Gas Company for terms for lighting all the lamps’ (EWN)Correspondence with Leatherdale and Payle. Resolved to do nothing at present. Gas co for revised terms.(minutes)

Witham Gas Co., 5 September 1921 (D/F 27/7/1)
Long discussion about correspondence with UDC to date. Proposed that offer be withdrawn and instead offer to light 52 lamps at £4 per annum, to include lighting, cleaning and keeping in order by the company, and remaining 52 unlighted lamps to be paid for the by the Council at 2s per lamp per month for the eight lighting months. Or as an alternative to offer Council whole of lamp standards, lamps and fittings, Company supplying gas by meter at 10% discount.

UDC Roads Committee, 10 September 1921, page 114
Letter from Witham Gas Co, 6th inst. Company would light not less than 52 lamps at £4 each per annum Council to pay 2 shillings per lamp per month for the unlighted lamps for the eight lighting months. Or alternatively, Company offered to sell ‘the whole of the lamp standards, lamps and fittings by valuation and to supply Gas’ at 10% per 1000 ft below price charged for private consumption. Recommended not accept.

UDC Council meeting, 26 September 1921 (Essex Weekly News, 30 September 1921)
‘Mr Eb Smith said he was quite in agreement with the Council when they decided not to accept the terms of the Gas Company for lighting Witham’s streets, but he did not think they ought to face the whole winter in complete darkness. The Committee considered that 16 gas lamps would be sufficient, and he proposed that until such time as a better system could be adopted 16 hurricane oil lamps be affixed where needed. – The Vice-Chairman said they had already decided not to pay the charges asked by the Gas Company, and had also agreed not to light the town this winter: therefore, he said, let the town be in darkness. They did not want to decorate the town with fairy lamps, which were practically useless for the purpose intended – Mr Pinkham said he did not want to see the town in darkness. They could retaliate if they chose by ordering he Gas Company to remove the lamp standards from the streets, which would cost them £250. He suggested that the Council send a deputation to talk the matter over with the Company. The Chairman said the Council had appointed a committee for the purpose, but the Gas Company said they had made up their minds. He could not see what good a deputation would effect. Only the proposer voted for the resolution, which was declared lost’.

Witham Gas Co., 20 October 1921 (D/F 27/7/1)
UDC reply. Would not accept. Would involve a 4d rate. Discussion. Meeting suggested. Agreed to leave letter on table.

UDC Roads Committee, 11 November 1921, page 121
Letter from Witham Gas Co and Witham Co-operative Society, urging Council to meet the Gas Co re terms re street lights. Members appointed to do so.

Witham Gas Co., 14 November 1921 (D/F 27/7/1)
Correspondence with Urban District Council discussed. Propose joint conference.
Manager suggested charge for unlighted lamps should be based on capital value which he put at £500 for 52 lamps instead of 2s per lamp per month for the eight lighted months.

Witham Gas Co., 15 November 1921 (D/F 27/7/1)
Joint meeting with UDC representatives. For the Company Mr E M Blyth, Mr N L Howlett and Mr H B Peecock and secretary and manager.
For UDC, Mr J E Smith chair, Mr C S Richardson, Mr E L R Pelly, with clerk.
General discussion on situation. Agreed that any agreement should only go to end of April. UDC suggestion that not necessary to light the lamps for seven days at full moon each month, thrown out. Company agreed to charge £3 per lamp per annum instead of £4 per lamp per annum, for 52 lamps. Re the 52 unlighted lamps, capital value agreed at £400, agreed £20 per annum representing 5% per annum on capital value.

Note: UDC special meeting on 18 November 1921 unanimously accepted terms.

Witham Gas Co., 3 March 1922 (D/F 27/7/1)
To be reduction in cost of coal from Stafford.
Mr Johnson not paid account for tar – writ to be taken out.
‘Application from Mr C Warren to use the lamp (not in use by the UDC) at the entrance to his Garage was discussed.’ Chair and manager to agree terms.

Witham Gas Co., 18 April 1922 (D/F 27/7/1)
Charge of 12s. per annum to Mr C Warren to use lamp standard outside his garage.

UDC Roads Committee, 22 May 1922, page 143
Letter from Witham Gas Light and Coke Co Ltd, temporary arrangement for street lighting expired on 30th ult., what arrangement to make now. Read

Witham Gas Co., 13 June 1922 (D/F 27/7/1)
Letter from Urban District Council re terms for 52 lamps. Agreed price be £2 15s on similar terms as recently excluding seven days on or before each full moon. Or £3 12s 6d per lamp if wanted seven days on or before each full moon.

UDC Roads Committee, 22 June 1922, page 147
Letter from Witham Gas etc Co, quoting £2 15s per lamp per annum for 52 lamps from 1 September to 30 April next, plus 5% per annum on £400 the capitalised value of the 52 unlighted lamps. Resolved to leave in abeyance a month ‘in view of the reported reduction in the price of coal’.

UDC, full Council, 26 June 1922, page 194
‘Electric Lighting – A letter dated the 22d instant from Messrs Girlings Ltd was read putting forward a suggestion for lighting the Town with electric light. No action was taken in the matter’.

UDC Public Health Committee, 22 July 1924, page 328
Gas Company to be asked to quote for lighting the street lamps during the coming winter season.

Witham Gas Co., 25 July 1922 (D/F 27/7/1)
Letter from UDC. To write and say that Company had already taken into consideration the reduced price of coal.

Witham Gas Co., 17 July 1923 (D/F 27/7/1)
Letter UDC re street lighting. Agreed to reduce price from £2 15s to £2 12 6 per lamp.

Witham Gas Co., 8 August 1924 (D/F 27/7/1)
Secretary had written to Urban District Council after discussion with Directors, offering to light the 52 street lamps as before at £2 12s 6d per lamp from 1 September to 31 March 1925. UDC accepted.
UDC had asked whether Company would provide and light Gas Lamps ‘along the Cressing Road adjoining the Council’s Housing Site, and on what terms’. Long discussion.
Agreed to write and find out ‘whether the Council would fit up their houses, already erected and to be erected, for Gas consumption, this to include the service’ [i.e. beyond the first thirty feet]’ and also the approximate number of street lamps required.

UDC Housing Committee, 20 August 1924, page 1
Letter from Witham Gas Company. Terms for gas main in Braintree Road, asking how many street lamps. Surveyor instructed to ascertain cost of putting gas to Council houses for gas stoves.

UDC Housing Committee, 30 August 1924, page 10
Cressing Road lighting – estimated cost of pipes for gas stoves £2 per house. Resolved that Gas Co be asked to put main to ‘Braintree Road corner’ and put two lamps, one at the Bridge and the other at the corner, and that laying gas to houses be deferred.

UDC Public Health Committee, 22 September 1924, page 19
Applications from occupiers near Red Lion and occupants of almshouses in Guithavon Street for lighting and additional lamps. Surveyor to inspect.
Letter from Witham Gas Co. Shouldn’t be asked to continue main to Braintree Road corner for 2 lamps only till decision on lighting Cressing Rd.

UDC Housing Committee, 15 October 1924, page 32
Gas Co need assuring that all houses will want gas before continuing main along site. Tenants to be asked if prepared to use gas.

UDC, full Council, 17 October 1924, page 314
Resolved to light lamp at Woolpack in Church Street. Mr W Pinkham dissented.

UDC Public Health Committee, 19 December 1924, page 58
Cressing Road lighting. Correspondence with Witham Gas Co. Deputation to directors didn’t consider purpose in discussing further.

Witham Gas Co., 16 January 1925 (D/F 27/7/1)
Further correspondence with UDC re Cressing Road. Let drop pending further reply from Council.

UDC Public Health Committee, 23 January 1925, page 74
Letter from Witham Gas Co. Saying extending main to houses now being erected by Crittall in Braintree Road. Does Council still want two street lamps nearby. Resolved one on right hand side opposite Cressing Road.

UDC Public Health Committee, 23 January 1925, page 76
Petition by nine inhabitants in Mill Lane requiring lamp opposite Poplar Terrace be lighted. Agreed.

UDC Public Health Committee, 19 February 1925, page 89
Cressing Road lighting. Letters from Witham Gas Co received. Company prepared to place a ‘gas Standard opposite the entrance to Cressing road and light the same’ but not available till September because main not laid yet.

Witham Gas Co., 6 March 1925 (D/F 27/7/1)
More correspondence re Cressing Road. Agreed would lay main and services at 30s for each house.

Witham Gas Co., 17 April 1925 (D/F 27/7/1)
UDC did not accept terms for Council Houses. Leave letter on table. Nem Con.

UDC Public Health Committee, 22 May 1925, page 131
Letter from East Anglian Electricity Ltd read ‘asking for permission to erect overhead mains in certain Streets in Witham’ and also letter the company sent to the County Surveyor asking same about the roads he has charge of. Decided to give permission.
Clerk directed to point out that according to the plans, no provision made for Cressing Road where Council’s houses were erected.

Witham Gas Co., 7 July 1925 (D/F 27/7/1)
Application from Mr R W Wakelin ‘for leave to display sign on lamp-post opposite his Garage’. Said need agreement of UDC. But Company would not object if reasonable rent paid.

UDC Public Health Committee, 14 October 1925, page 180
Letter from British Oxygen Co asking for three lamp standards in The Avenue. Owners of Avenue would be prepared to provide if lit. Recommended OK.
James Sorrell, wrote letter re lighting the lamp near the telegraph post near his shop in Newland Street. Decided to inspect.

UDC Public Health Committee, 16 December 1925, page 195
‘Letter from Witham Gas Light and Coke Co’. Stating that as so many complaints are unfairly and erroneously levelled at their Directors, in regard to the bad and inefficient lighting of the streets, they felt that the time has now come when the Council should seriously consider the lighting of all the lamps. The same distance has to be covered in lighting the lamps at present in use as would be covered for the whole if lit, and the cost for the complete lighting of the town would not be a very great extra, and undoubtedly a well lighted town is a great inducement to prospective residents.’ Clerk to find out cost.

UDC Public Health Committee, 2 January 1926, page 206
Cost given re lighting all gas lamps. Wait till further terms later in year.

Witham Gas Co., 8 January 1926 (D/F 27/7/1)
Letter from UDC asking cost for lighting all the lamps.
Proposed that £2 11s 6d be quoted per lamp for rest of contract. Capt Abrey proposed amendment, that terms should be as now. Not seconded. Original proposal accepted nem con.

Witham Gas Co., 3 August 1926 (D/F 27/7/1)
Letter from Urban District Council asking terms for street lamps. Agreed could not quote ‘under the present position of the Coal industry’ but would when ‘Emergency Regulations removed and normal supplies of coal resumed’ and expect to be able to offer same terms as last year.

UDC Public Health Committee, 25 August 1926, page 270
Letter from Gas Co. ‘Under the present position of the Coal Industry they regret that they are unable to quote terms for street lighting’. Will when Emergency Regulations removed and then at same terms as last year. Emergency regulations ‘debar public Authorities from street lighting except at dangerous points on the road’. Deferred.

Witham Gas Co., 10 September 1926 (D/F 27/7/1)
Letter from UDC re lighting street lamps at the dangerous corners. Resolved they should be, price to be left open for moment. [end of minute book, next one doesn’t survive]

UDC Public Health Committee, 22 September 1926, page 278
Street lighting. Letter from Witham Gas Light and Coke Co. Directors agreed to light lamps at dangerous corners in the town, price to be left open for now. Surveyor and manager had agreed on 24 lamps which should be lit. Resolved yes.

UDC Public Health Committee, 14 October 1926, page 285
Letter from Gas Co. Price for 24 lamps agreed. Difficulty because of uncertainty in coal industry and price of gas coal rising and already abnormal. Price quoted, Clerk to obtain cost for unlighted lamps.

UDC Public Health Committee, 17 November 1926, page 296
Gas Co say now 84 unlighted lamps, charge will be £8. Agreed.

UDC Public Health Committee, 11 December 1926, page 305
Gas Co will light ‘the remainder of the lamps usually lighted at 5s per lamp’. To 31 Dec. From 1 Jan to 30 April 1927 will accept 30s per lamp. Accept.

UDC Housing Committee, 31 January 1927, page 317
Census of people requiring gas on Council estate taken. 87 people said required. Letter from Witham Gas Co about cost. Need guarantee that minimum of 75% of the houses will be fitted up for consumption of gas. No loan under Housing Acts. Negotiate with Gas Co.

UDC, full Council, 28 January 1929, page 412
Street lighting. Resolved that seal affixed to agreement with East Anglian Electricity Supply Co for lighting of three lamps, one each at the following points, Collingwood Road corner, Maldon Road corner, and corner near Gasworks where Bridge Street adjoining Newland Street.[previous reference in index to street lighting is 26 July 1926, when lighting for the coming season lighting referred to Public Health Committee]

Public Health Committee, 19 July 1929, pages 260 – 261
‘Street Lighting. The Clerk reported that he had written to the Gas Company for prices for lighting the street lamps for the ensuing Winter, and further that he had enquired from the East Anglian Electric Supply Co Ltd, the price for lighting three further lamps in the main street. He has not yet heard from the Gas Company as the Directors have not yet met and that the East Anglian Electric Supply Co wrote stating that the price for the lamps will be £7 15 6 per 300 watt lamp the lights to be placed on the Standards.
Resolved to recommend that the main street be lighted with electric light and Councillors Pinkham and Manning were asked to inspect the High Street and ascertain the positions of the lamps and report on the number of Gas Standards that could be dispensed with. The acceptance of a price be referred to the Finance Committee’.

Finance Committee, 24 July 1929, page 266
Street Lighting. Quote now received from Gas Company. i.e. for lighting all lamps except seven, £2 12 6 per lamp. For ditto except 17 lamps, £2 15 0 per lamp.
Councillors Pinkham and Manning had inspected, and ‘came to the conclusion that if twelve electric lamps are lighted between the Catholic Church and Poplar Hall then 33 gas lamps could be dispensed with. Approximate position given of 12 lamps.
Prices would be similar to doing it by gas but electricity ‘much more efficient’.
Resolved to recommend that electricity be adopted from Poplar Hall to Catholic Church and that Gas Company be asked to quote for lighting remainder of lamps as last season.

Public Health Committee, 9 Aug 1929, p 268
Street Lighting. East Anglian Electric Supply Company Ltd had written quoting for lighting nine further lights during ‘lighting season’ i.e. 1 September to 30 April inclusive. i.e. £7 10 6. Also in conversation between Clerk and manager, quoted £7 15 6 to light all year round from sunset to 11 p.m.
Committee looked at main street and decided 14 lamps would be needed.
Resolved to recommend they be all lit from sunset to 11 p.m. throughout year, provided Company quote same price as quoted for the further nine.

UDC, full Council, 17 August 1929, page 426
Resolved to adopt report of Public Health Committee re street lighting ‘so far as the number of electric lamps is concerned, and to request the East Anglian Electricity Supply Company to agree that the number consists of six 300 watt and six 200 watt lamps at £67 14 6 per annum, the lamps to be lighted from sunset until 11 p.m, from September 1st 1929 until April 30th 1930 inclusive. Left in hands of Chairman and Clerk to make best terms possible.
Gas lamps ‘The Witham Gas Light and Coke Co Ltd having quoted £2 16s per lamp for lighting all the street lamps as per last season with the exception of 33 in the main street’, resolved to accept.

UDC, November 1929, in Braintree and Witham Times, 29 November 1929, page 2
National Union of Railwaymen had complained about overhead wires for telegraph and electric lights. To write back and say no problem, double deckers can pass.

UDC, 24 February 1930, in Braintree and Witham Times, 28 February 1930, page 3
Petition from residents of The Avenue, asking for better lighting. Clerk to write saying would be reviewed at next lighting season.

Public Health Committee, 16 July 1930 page 56.
Street lighting. Surveyor has asked for prices from Gas Co and Electric Co. Latter has tendered. Gas still to meet.

Pub Health Committee, 28 July 1930
page 62. Street lighting . Tenders from Gas Light and Coke Co and East Anglian Electricity Supply Ltd. Details. Recommend accepting Gas Co for 84 lamps at £2 16s 0d per lamp from 1 September 1930 to 30 April 1931, same as last year.

Public Health Committee, 15 October 1930, page 89.
Representations from various areas re inadequate street lighting.

Public Health Committee, 20 October 1930, page 91.
Street lighting. Prices obtained for extra lamps from Gas and Electricity Companies. Committee then visited The Avenue, The Market, Chipping Hill Bridge, Highfields Road, Millbridge Road. Recommend:
1. Electric light at end of Avenue in Newland Street moved and put in centre of junction.
2. Gas Company asked to increase power of lamp ‘on the Green opposite the Market’.
New electric light at Chipping Hill bridge. New ditto in Highfields Road. New ditto in Millbridge Road.

UDC December 1930, in Braintree and Witham Times, 2 January 1931, page 3
East Anglian Electricity Supply Co intended to put overhead main in White Horse Lane. Resolved to ask for underground main here as narrow and no footpath.

UDC, full Council, 23 February 1931 page 482
Electric light poles. Councillor Ebenezer Smith referred to minute of Public Health Committee of 16 November 1928 re removal of ‘electric light pole which is in a dangerous position near Millfield Terrace, Guithavon Valley, and that the pole has not yet been moved’. Resolved to instruct Clerk to draw attention of Company to it and request removal.

UDC Public Health Committee, 13 May 1931, page 182.
Cross Road. Street lighting. Ask Gas Company to arrange for supply of two gas standards in Cross Road, and move the two near junctions at each end of Cross Road, to light up Cross Road better.

UDC Public Health Committee, 15 July 1931, page 198.
Tenders received for lighting. Gas and Electricity. Agree to meet Braintree Manager of East Anglian Electricity Supply Co to discuss positions. Also question of removing some poles in dangerous positions.

UDC Public Health Committee, 22 July 1931, page 202.
Revised arrangement from Electricity Supply Company. Recommend that Committee ‘of opinion that the lighting of the streets will be better served by electricity’. Accept E A Supply Co tender. Subject to agreement. This was for ‘60 lamps in various positions’, according to plan, lighted from sunset till 11 p.m. from August 22 to April 30.
Gas was to be £2 6s per lamp for 86 lamps from 1 September to 30 April.

UDC, 27 July 1931, in Braintree and Witham Times, 30 July 1931, page 9
[implication that already some electric street lights]

UDC full Council of 26 July 1931, reported in Braintree and Witham Times, 30 July 1931?
‘STREET LIGHTING. Tenders were received from the Witham Gas Light and Gas Co. Ltd Ltd and the East Anglian Electricity Supply Co Ltd.

The gas company’s price is £2 16s per lamp for 86 lamps from 1st September to 30 April – £240 16s.

The electric light company’s price is for 56 lamps in various positions according to the plan deposited by them, from 9th August to 9th May (sunset until 11 p.m. – £150); Annual charge for equipment for 7 years – £80; Total £230. At the end of the 7 years the equipment would become the property of the Council. Alternatively the company would provide the equipment in the first instance for the sum of £500.

It was resolved to meet the Braintree manager of the East Anglian Electric Supply Company as to the positions and sufficiency of the lamps. The question of the removal of certain poles which are in dangerous positions would also be dealt with.

It was further reported that the Public Health Committee met two representatives of the East Anglian Electric Supply Company Limited in connection with their tender and the plan of proposed lamp positions. The suggested positions were visited and various alterations suggested, with the addition of four extra lamps, and the representatives of the company were requested to submit a revised price for the consideration of this Committee.

Subsequently the Public Health Committee considered a revised price from the East Anglian Electric Supply Co. Ltd., as follows:-

Sixty lamps in various positions according to the plan deposited, and as agreed by the committee on the 18th instant, lighted from sunset until 11 p.m. each evening from August 22nd to April 30th, the company to maintain all time switches and lamps, also renew lamps when necessary. Per annum – £156 10s. Annual charge for equipment for seven years – £88 10s. Total £245.

It was resolved that as the committee are of opinion that the lighting of the streets will be better served by electricity, the tender of the East Anglian Electricity Supply Co. Ltd be accepted, subject to an agreement being entered into to cover the whole of the existing and new lamps, and the insertion of a clause that in the event of the general charges for current being reduced in this area, the contract price shall receive consideration with a view to reduction.

The chairman [Mr Pinkham] said the price fixed would be the same as the electricity company charged Braintree. Witham was now entering upon something different than heretofore and they wanted to do so with their eyes fully open. After the matter was once settled it was settled for seven years. He did not see how they were going to get their lighting at a cheaper rate, and if the rest of the town was lighted with the efficiency demonstrated in the High Street the street lighting of Witham would certainly be improved.

Mr Burrows: I think it will make a big improvement.

The chairman added that by lighting the street by electricity it would be better in the long run for the tradespeople, because the more electricity there was consumed the cheaper it might eventually be.

The motion was then carried’.

UDC Public Health Committee, 13 January 1932, page 250.
Street lighting. Tender from Electricity Company re Powers Hall End and district. Defer.

UDC Finance Committee, 25 May 1932, page 21a.
Eb Smith had had complaints about distribution of street lights.

August 1932 in Braintree and Witham Times, review of the year, 29 December 1923, page 2
‘Braintree Council decides to continue use of gas for street lighting’.

UDC Public Health Committee, 14 September 1932, page 35.
Residents in Hatfield Road want street lights. Contact Electricity Co about this and other matters.

UDC Public Health Committee, 19 October 1932, page 49.
Electricity Company quoted for lights in Powershall End and Hatfield Road (five and four lights respectively). Ask them to proceed but negotiate terms for whole system. Put new light outside Police Station in Guithavon Street. Consider lighting of Lockram Lane.

UDC Public Health Committee, 25 October 1932, page 51.
Street lighting. Inspected at this meeting. Ask East Anglian Elec. Supply Co to ‘suspend the lamps across the following roads’ Collingwood, Avenue Road, The Avenue, railway Bridge. Newland Street and Bridge Street. Also various detailed alterations and movements of lights mentioned.

UDC Public Health Committee, 16 November 1932, page 57.
Enter new agreement with East Anglian Electricity Co for street lighting for 7 years.

UDC Public Health Committee, 14 December 1932, page 66.
Rev Campbell has suggested ‘that the light now at Chipping Hill immediately opposite the cottage site purchased from Mr Richards, be moved nearer the Pillar Box close to Mr Doole’s shop. This spot is in darkness and formerly a gas lamp was there which was very convenient for persons using the box at night’. Yes.

Also ask Gas Company to ‘move a gas standard now standing on the island in Avenue Road outside Messrs Cooper Taber’s factory, ‘to make room for the electric lamp now on that corner to be removed there to improve lighting there’.

UDC Public Health Committee, 15 November 1933, page 185.
Various alterations in arrangement of electric light poles, details given.

UDC Public Health Committee, 8 May 1935, page 14.
Recommend adopting report of Sub-Committee appointed by Public Health Committee re street lighting. Braintree Road, moving and some extra lights. Rickstones Road ditto. Church Street, Powershall End, Highfields Road, Guithavon Road, Guithavon Street and Newland Street and Bridge Street. Some places to have ‘tri multi reflector’ strung between two poles. Details. Improvement needed. Recommend beginning lighting half an hour after sunset instead of at sunset, and continue up to 11 30 p.m. instead of 11 p.m. Thanks to Mr McKinley, representative of East Anglian Electricity Supply Co Ltd, for his assistance and advice during inspection. 

UDC Water, Highways and Works Committee, 18 December 1935
Extension of street lighting beyond Sauls Bridge proceeding.

UDC Water, Highways and Works Committee, 16 December 1936, page 627.
Street lighting East Anglian Electricity Company submitted quote of lighting all year round at extra £10 3s 1d. At present from 9 August to 9 May, for £378.7.3 from half an hour after sunset to 11.30p.m. More on Silver End. Investigate and consider later.

Quotes from Gas Company for two lights at Homefield Road [electricity also seem to have quoted but gas a bit less and accepted]

UDC Water, Highways and Works Committee, 13 January 1937
page 663.
Street lights failing in Highfields. Take it up with Electricity Company.

Cricket

Cricket, oddments

Are lots of other things too.

Essex Weekly News, 26 March 1915
page 8 (see xerox on newspaper file)
Cricket Club. Annual meeting. Percy Laurence presided. Treas H B Peecock. Hon C H Strutt ‘wrote saying that cricket must go slow this year’. Money required for urgent national needs,. Cttee had decided not fixtures this year. Members invited to pay half subs, ‘except those who pay’ in case of scratch matches.

Essex County Chronicle, 26 March 1915
page 4 (see xerox on newspaper file).
Cricket. Witham Club. Annual meeting at the Eagle Hotel. P E Laurence president in chair. Treasurer H B Peecock. C H Strutt had written saying cricket should ‘go slow’ this year; Agreed no fixtures. Committee left in charge.

page 8 (see xerox on newspaper file). Letter from an old member saying applaud decision of cricket club [not to have matches]. Witham ‘done well in way of recruiting, and the Cricket Club itself has furnished over forty members who are serving his Majesty’s Forces, no fewer than thirty of whom are playing members’. Hoped for some local members and ‘especially that facilities be given to soldiers to play’.

Essex Weekly News, 7 July 1916
page 6, col 8 (see xerox on newspaper file). ‘Cricket. Witham drew with the Bedfordshire Yeomanry on Saturday, making 215 for 7 wickets (Rev C G Littlehales 110[?], C S Richardson 29, Corpl Yates 24, G C Butler 22); Yeomanry 108 for 6 wickets (Lieut Bicker-Caarten 39, Major Spencer 32, Pte Turner 13 not out)’.

Essex County Chronicle, 28 March 1919
page 6 (see xerox on newspaper file).
‘Witham Cricket Club. Why Outdoor Recreation was preferred to growing potatoes’. Annual meeting at the Grove by invitation of the President, Mr P E Laurence. Mr W Stevens, for many years hon sec, voted to chair. Mr Laurence not well. Mr A P Snell of Brighton had written. Report by management committee, Laurence, Stevens and H B Peecock. ‘Carried on the club last year for the benefit of soldiers, and military league matches were played. The bar had not been open ..’

Letter from Essex sec, hoped to arrange a match at Witham ‘between the Australian Imperial Forces and Essex Amateurs’.

Mr Pelly thanked committee for ‘the use of the ground by the Volunteers for drilling’.

Hope to get a professional to improve the ground.

‘The Chairman: It has been thrown in my teeth several times that the Witham cricket ground should have been ploughed up to grow food, but I consider that it was far better to maintain the cricket ground to provide outdoor recreation for our soldiers than to grow potatoes to fill the stomachs of the British public (Hear, hear).

Mr Bawtree said ‘Witham had a perfect wicket in the past – easily the best in Essex’.

Mr Stewart Richardson disappointed young men not at meeting.

Mr S Richardson elected captain, he had been in 1914. Said ‘In the future Witham Cricket Club will occupy a more prominent position than ever. The clubs at Chelmsford, Colchester and Brentwood have gone, and Witham alone remains’.

Essex Weekly News, 4 April 1924
page 6. Cricket. Witham club’s serious deficit. Report.

Braintree and Witham Times, 18 February 1932
page 8, cols 4 and 5.. Article about ‘over 80 years of cricket’ at Witham. Nice photo of ‘an early Witham team’. Writer says ‘So far as I am aware the photograph reproduced is the earliest one extant of the Witham Club. This portrait was taken round about the year 1878, but the owner of the picture, Mr Hugh F Bawtree, is uncertain as to the exact date. However, it illustrates clearly how the players of the period dressed, and the absence of white clothing generally. Mr Bawtree, a giant in stature, has a ball in his hand, while the player seated on the extreme left [probably means right] of the picture (W Shee) appears to have football studs in his boots instead of cricket spikes. It is safe to state that studs of that nature would cause the player to be  chased off the Witham playing pitch today. Of the group only one player is now living, namely Mr Mortimer Groves, who can be seen on the right of the photograph with his arms folded, and who probably officiated as scorer. The dog in the foreground belonged to the captain, Mr Bawtree, and had learned to retrieve balls during the club’s practice evenings [but see 10 March, says belonged to W Shee]. Charlie Roberts, the club professional, and Charles Stevens are holding bats, which shew much longer handles than we now use. Also there would be no rubber handle cover as is now the practise.

Some of the names  in the picture, reading from left to right, are: H S Mortimer (“Granny” Mortimer’s late husband), John Mann, James Gamble, Don Davey, and then we come to Frank Bawtree, Charlie Stevens, Charles Roberts, Ted Mortimer, W Potter Groves. Seated are Fred Pluck, Joe Pluck and W Shee. Joe Pluck later became the club umpire. Charles Roberts was mine host of the old “Bell” public house outside the ground. The gentleman who intrigues me in the picture is the one in the centre of the group with a bat tucked under his arm. To me that bat seems uncomfortable, or as out of place as a fountain pen would have been in the hands of the scorer of those times. It is obvious from the drawn expressions upon the faces of the troup that having a photograph taken was a serious business. The only flicker of a smile I can detect is on the face of the gentleman with the bat, in the centre, and the suggestion of humour fits him splendidly. The players were, I expect not quite so serious looking when stripped for action. There is fun in cricket if you will let it come to the top, but having your photo taken over 50 years ago was an ordeal only to be compared with trying to stop one of Isted’s underhand expresses’. Match at Lanhams Green in 1851. would be bowler hats, meet at Spread Eagle for a drink, go in a gig to the pitch, stopping at pub. Mr Crittall, county cricketer (father of FH) for other team. Was in Surrey team before came to Braintree. Summary of play, from score card, which given.

Braintree and Witham Times, 10 March 1932
page 8. Good photo of early Witham football team in striped shirts … Was sent by W H Bailey of Hill Cottage, Great Ormescy Norfolk. Asking for return of photo. Date unknown. Says of earlier picture of cricket [see 18 February], that might be Gentry of Totham between chap with smile unknown, and Don Davey. Doesn’t think dog that retrieved the balls belonged to Mr Bawtree, there was Darkie a black retriever of W Shee who fetched them. So they were always soggy. It watched game in between. Charles Roberts shown as footballer as well as cricketer. [see also follow up on 7 April]

Braintree and Witham Times, 23 June 1932
page 3. Nice photo. Witham Fife and Drum band of fifty years ago. … At that time there were two sports meetings a year, on Bank Holidays, and the fife and drum band performed at them. Also was a cycling club, the Eagle Cycling Club based at the Spread Eagle. Band went to the cycle races in the Park. … Boys in caps. Five of them still survive. ‘Mr Mead recalls the days when the cricket ground was a centre of local fashion. Carriages used to drive onto the ground and a good crowd always attended the matches’. He says town dead now. Rail and motorists responsible.

Allotments


Oddments


How big is an allotment? (www.nsalg.org.uk/allotment-info/
)
An allotment is traditionally measured in rods (perches or poles), an old measurement dating back to Anglo-Saxon times. 10 poles is the accepted size of an allotment, the equivalent of 250 square metres or about the size of a doubles tennis court.

1841 Tithe map
Cut Throat Lane – field belonged to Freeborns farm that is now allotments.

1841
ERO Accession A5404. ‘Bramston scrapbooks’, Book 1, greenish cover, page 19 of notes
Poster
‘To the Poor Inhabitants of Witham. Notice is hereby given that it is intended to divide a Field, near Chipping Hill Bridge, called Knee Field, into allotments of garden ground not exceeding 20 rods. Any person wishing to hire an Allotment of 10 or 20 rods is requested to apply immediately to Mr Wade at the National School, who will set down the applicant’s name, and give him information   ‘ [information not specified]. Occupation on 1 November next .John Bramston, Oct 1841.
Pro-forma
‘Witham Field Gardens. Allotment no —, — Rods of Ground. Yearly Rent —s —d  and one Potato’.
Conditions, include:
‘No Work … On Lords Day or Christmas Day or Good Friday’
Not to under-let without permission.
No buildings or trees allowed.
Keep neat.
No ploughing.
Not more than half of ground to have potatoes.
Gates kept locked.
No children except to work. Damages ‘by them to be made good by the Parent’.
If dishonest or injury to other tenant, or convicted of any offence against law, or reach rules, landlord can take possession.
To be signed and witnessed.

1842-72
Surrey History Centre: Earls of Onslow of Clandon Park, Estate Papers
Earls of Onslow of Clandon Park, West Clandon: Estate papers of the 4th and 5th Earls of Onslow
Catalogue Ref.1320
Allotment hiring card for Witham Field Gardens, with conditions and record of lettings 1847-1872 – ref.1320/418/5? – date: [c1887]
From web site of A2A, Access to Archives: Http://www.a2a.pro.gov.uk/search/docframe.asp?styletype=xsl&i=110&filename=xsl\A2A_com.xsl&com=1

 

Dr Dixon’s diary, in Essex Record Office
Saturday, November 12 1842, ERO D/DU 1639

Corn Markets higher, but the Cattle fair to day at Chelmsford was dull indeed, but very few sales at very low prices, but probably not so low as they seem likely to settle down to. I find that in North Essex the farmers are determined to keep pace in lowering poor mens wages with the Cattle and Corn. Labour there is now 14d per day! Being 8/ per week!! And the allotments let to labourers (being prohibited in many instances from growing ??? straw crops) is charge to them 6d per rod or £4 per acre. The farmers who underlet in this way giving for the same land 25/ or 30/ per acre! Our labour here is paid at the rate of 11/ per week by the day with small beer. By the by some of my neighbours lay claim to an excessive amount of charity in letting out these allotments to Agricultural labourers. Our Vicar the Reverend Mr. Bramston held his rent audit in his Coach House last Friday evening. The Entertainment consisted of roast mutton (alias baked), plum-puddings, ale and Bacca. The number of Tenants 70 (or about that). Bramston presided with his Curate Mr. Fagun as vice. The quantity of land in each holding is ?  rods for which these poor people pay 8d per rod!! Which is at the rate of £5:6.8 per acre!!! The Landlord paying Tithe Rate and other outgoings. The parson in taking his charity garment out of this affair will have but a thin covering for his sins!

In his predecessors time 6 years ago this land was let to a farmer for 30/ per acre.

 

Dr Dixon’s diary, Sunday September 14th, 1845, ERO D/DU 1639

The accounts from all quarters state the potato crop to be most destructively diseased. I have taken up one piece of Pink eyed Kidneys and not one in ten are sound. I have some I hope much better but some which were taken up a fortnight since supposed to be unaffected are beginning to decay and I have great apprehensions that the failure will be much greater than is feared. This must prove a heavy calamity to the Poor as the potato crop in the allotment gardens is to them of much moment.

 

Dr Dixon’s diary, Wednesday September 24th, 1845, ERO D/DU 1639

Weather yesterday & today fine with sharp frosts in the morning which has cut down the potatoes when they were not previously destroyed by the murrains – I have determined not to take up mine for some time. I think they will be riper in the ground, such of them as are not rotten. In the allotments or field gardens of the poor I calculate that two thirds of the crop is destroyed and I very much fear that those which appear sound are not so and that they will rot in a few weeks. The new varieties appear to me to suffer least. Some of our old sorts have entirely perished from the disease or murrain. At present if well steamed with a little salt they agree with my sows & pigs but they hardly eat them raw. It is now said that this disease made its appearances in some districts last year and that it may prove fatal in following years.

 

Dr Dixon’s diary, Thursday October 9th, 1845, ERO D/DU 1639

Rain at intervals during the day, which being our ploughing match & meeting for prizes for cottage gardens, allotments etc. dampened the proceedings in the field at Mr Hutley. But few ladies could attend. We dined afterwards at White Hart Lord Raleigh in the Chair. A smart speaking  conversation on farming & matters connected with the society followed in the evening. Quite enough talkers. Farmers can make speeches such as their ancestors little dreamed of.

 

Dr Dixon’s diary, Wednesday January 7th, 1846, ERO D/DU 1639

This has been a mild, cheerful day like April, the winds of December quite hushed – not so the political world. Meetings in favour of Corn Laws continue to be held in various places but the high tone of the actors in them is fast coming down & meetings for a repeal (total) gain strength & power every day. At a village in Wiltshire a meeting in the evening of the labourers has been held of which a full report in the Times of this day. They assembled in the road & a labourer was called to the Chair. Resolutions were moved & seconded in a regular manner with speeches by labourers & if the Tale they told be true a more monstrous system of oppression is not to be found in History. One circumstance particularly requires notice namely that allotments let to the poor pay at least double rents to the same land let to common tenants. The same occurs here our Vicar Mr Bramston let land to the poor at the rate of £5 per acre!! By our previous vicar this land was let to a farmer for 30/. Lord Rayleigh also lets a field in this parish to the poor for upwards of £5 per acre. This is called charity forsooth!! I wonder if the Parson can find a passage in the Bible to sanction this.

 

Dr Dixon’s diary, Wednesday, March 10, 1847

A very sharp frost this morning and all the drain pipes made these two last days frozen & destroyed, & my men today have suspended work. The spring vegetables Brocoli lettuce &c are fast perishing under this severe weather which added to the potato failure presses heavily upon the poor labourer who cultivates his allotment piece & for wh. here he commonly pays a double rent to the Landlord, that is double what a tenant farmer pays. Wheaten bread is now well nigh our only resource for food.

 

Dr Dixon’s diary, Friday, April 30, 1847

Corn Markets at Chelmsford today firm. I sold one parcel of red wheat at 84/- & another at 83/-. Our labourers almost literally live upon bread. No potatoes are left & cold late spring has destroyed much of the Cabbage tribe in their garden allotments. Many are hungry & half fed. This has however been a favorable week although not warm for the growth of vegetation. Moderate showers are more suitable to vegetation than hasty & heavy rains.

 

Dr Dixon’s diary, Sunday, September 26, 1847

The Anniversarys of the Agricultural Societys are now being held in this & other counties.  In some cases their meetings are entirely devoted to a public distribution of prizes to labourers & servants embracing every variety of farming & domestic engagements. & for the cultivation of garden allotments &c. In others prizes to farmers for best roots, cattle &c. Any common object which brings the different classes of society has a beneficial tendency but it unfortunately happens that Landlord & Tenants frequently meet only on these occasions in a Social Manner for many Landlords employ agents to make bargains for occupying land as well as to take rents getting away as much as possible from all intercourse with the parties with whose interests they are so much complicated & then again farmers keep as much aloof from their labourers & thus all parties try to break asunder the links which ought to bind them together.

 

 

UDC Building Committee, 21 March 1911, page 33 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/1)

Mr Blood be asked to name price for part of the former allotment field at Chipping Hill [this for building cottages].

 

UDC Building Committee, 24 March 1911, page 34 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/1)

Mr Blood offered frontage of the old allotment field in Church Street at £75 per acre. [this for building cottages].

 

30 January 1917, page 768, D/UWi 1/4/2 Urban District Council Letter Book

Council has considered extension of land for cultivation. Society’s field Pains Haven is suitable Do Society intend to cultivate it?

To Mr F Simpson, Secretary, Witham Co-op.

 

UDC 25 June 1917 (ERO D/UWi 1/1/3)

page 389. To get two sprayers for potatoes to prevent disease, for use of allotment holders. Invite applications for spraying at 3d per rod.

 

UDC 28 January 1918 (ERO D/UWi 1/1/3)

page 431. Letter from Essex War Agricultural Committee re ‘cultivation of as much land as possible in allotments’. No action necessary.

 

Essex Weekly News, 1 February 1918

page 4, col 3. Witham Urban District Council meeting.

Allotments. Captain Abrey proposed Council should use land purchased for cemetery, for allotments. Cemetery not required for years. Mr Garrett seconded. Chairman said notice required.

 

Essex Weekly News, 22 February 1918

page 6, col 3. Potato spraying. Mr F Griffiths from Food Production Department. Address in Congregational schoolroom. Mr E Smith presided. Recommended allotment holders etc to spray crops. Great increase in production would ensue.

 

UDC, 25 February 1918 (ERO D/UWi 1/1/3)

pages 437-38. Discussion how best to cultivate cemetery field, e.g. allotments. Decided to ask ‘Messrs Crittall if they would let their field in Braintree Road to the Council for purposes of allotments for duration of the war’.

 

Essex Weekly News, 1 March 1918

page 5, col 5. Witham Urban District Council Meeting, Mr P Hutley in chair.

Allotments. Mr Abrey moved rescinding decision not to use three acres of cemetery land for allotments. He approached by men who wanted allotments, and thought they should be encouraged. Mr W Taber seconded. Mr W Pinkham against – thought wrong to let – better to cultivate it themselves. Mr J E Smith agreed. Resolution defeated by chairman’s casting vote. Mr Pinkham proposed Committee appointed to cultivate the field . Carried by same vote. Re allotments, decided to ask Crittall Manufacturing Co to allow their building site at Chipping Hill to be used. Pinkham, Taber and Smith appointed as Allotment Committee.

 

UDC 25 March 1918 (ERO D/UWi 1/1/3)

page 445. ‘Read letter from Mr W Gardner of 12th inst. as to 7 acres of land of the Crittall Manufacturing Company Limited which was available for allotments.’ Ask press to record facts in their reports.

 

UDC 29 April 1918, Annual Meeting (ERO D/UWi 1/1/3)

page 452. Allotments. Interview with Mr Jacques Inspector of allotments from Food Production Department, Whitehall, and ‘inspection of Pans Haven field. Mr Gardner (agent for Messrs Crittall, the owners) also attended and stated that Messrs Crittall had received permission of the Government to commence building on the field at any time and he had received instructions to provide storage in the neighbourhood for the machinery etc which was ready. Also that arrangements had been made with the Great Eastern Railway Company to construct a Railway Siding’. Agreed that to explain to Mr J that Council willing to hire but would have to be short notice.

 

30 April 1918, page 963, D/UWi 1/4/2 Urban District Council Letter Book, 30 April 1918, page 963, D/UWi 1/4/2 Urban District Council Letter Book

To ‘Inspector Food Production Dept, Ipswich.’

Have seen Messrs Crittall’s agent (‘Mr Walter Gardner of this town’). Confirmed Messrs Crittall have Government permit to proceed with building on field, ‘which they may be obliged to exercise at any time, and that the Great Eastern Railway have undertaken to construct a siding from their line into the Works immediately Messrs Crittall request them to do so. He also stated that the plant and machinery, and a good part of the joinery, were already completed for erection’. He has tried to let it without much success, a few allotments only. Council willing to hire it if felt right to cultivate.

To ‘Inspector Food Production Dept, Ipswich.’

 

UDC Allotments Committee, 13 February 1920, page 30 [first one of this Committee noticed] (ERO D/UWi 1/2/2)

Application by resident in Chipping Hill for allotments. Mr H T Isted, representative of Lord Rayleigh, attended. Allotment Holders deputation of five also attended. They had named part of Moat Farm. They refused pieces in Highfields Road and near the Cemetery field. Deputation insisted on Council acquiring Moat Fm land under compulsory powers. Mr Isted suggested Mr J E Smith and his son Mr L E Smith should attend at Terling tomorrow at 10 a.m. to confer with Hon E G Strutt.

[continued on p 34] Application of residents in Maldon Road for allotments considered. Mr Bawtree willing to sell his field in Maldon Road now occupied by Mr Sorrell for £500. This considered excessive. Mr Pinkham to meet him.

Adopted

 

UDC Allotments Committee, 24 February 1920, page 32 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/2)

Letter from Mr H F Bawtree. After consultation with brother would sell field for £420, and if Council accepted would give Mr Sorrell notice. Agreed to accept if purchase price not more that £400.

Letter from Mr Isted. Mr Smith agreed to release the part of Moat farm required for allotments, ‘leaving it to the generosity of Mr Strutt in some way to make it up to him’. But Mr Smith said hadn’t had offer. Clerk to write to Lord Rayleigh about alternative land for Mr Smith.

Adopted

 

UDC Allotments Committee, 27 February 1920, page 35 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/2)

Mr Bawtree agreed to sell Maldon Road land for £400 and Mr Sorrell would relinquish. Agreed to purchase.

Re Chipping Hill, Mr L E Smith had letter; Mr Strutt would let him have Lenny’s Field if he would give up field at Moat Farm for allotments. But would have to wait till Michaelmas because Mr Strutt wanted to take crop at Lenny’s. But places in hands of council subject to compensation, and fence against cattle on either side of plot.

Chairman directed to see Housing Commissioner to urge confirmation of Compulsory Order re part of Cocks Farm as soon as possible, to enable Council to offer part of that to Committee.

Adopted

 

UDC Allotments Committee, 24 March 1920, page 42 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/2)

Maldon Road. Resolved to plough and disk harrow it. Then mark it up in 10 rod plots. No person to have more than one plot at present. Rent to be 8d a rod. Notice in Maldon Road to invite applications. Letter read from ‘the Witham and District Allotments Society’ suggesting field in Maldon Road be taken over by Society from Council  Decided not to entertain it.

Adopted

 

UDC Allotments Committee, 23 July 1920, page 56 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/2)

Complaints about cattle which ‘run into the Maldon Road allotment field from the road’. Gate and fence recommended.

Mr Pinkham had seen Mr S C Mayhew, Secretary of Witham and District Allotments Society, who said his Society required further land for allotments. Resolved to negotiate with Mr W Taber re field adjoining Cemetery field.

 

UDC Finance Committee, 29 May 1922, page 144 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/2)

Some moneys written off, i.e. owed for use of ambulance and for allotments.

 

UDC Roads Committee, 25 January 1924, page 274 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/2)

Allotment holders offered picked stones. Resolved to buy them for improving road leading to Brown’s Maltings. But don’t pay the holders whose rents are in arrears.

Adopted

 

UDC Estates Committee, 27 June 1924, page 321 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/2)

Some of Maldon Rd allotment land not used. A B Aldham offered to take on lease, at back of his premises, or to offer. Agreed to offer lease.

Adopted except for lease of allotment land, referred back

 

UDC Estates Committee, 22 January 1930 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/4)

page 322 Looking for allotment land to make up for what taken for housing in Guithavon Road. Mr Isted for Strutt and Parker would let 4 or 5 acres being part of field used as allotments next to Bridge Home, at back of and adjoining their field at present used for allotments. Negotiate.

 

Braintree and Witham Times, 31 January 1930, page 4

Urban District Council:

Guithavon Road estate. Mr Hodges wanted to buy his piece of allotment. Can’t because would interrupt building but would sell him ‘the spare piece of ground containing a disused gravel pit’.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 19 February 1930 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/4)

Don’t continue with hiring of land referred to before for allotments.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 18 February 1931 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/5)

page 142. Letter received re offering reduced prices for allotments to unemployed. To discuss with Witham Allotments Association. Mr F G Royce the secretary.

 

UDC Public Health Committee, 17 January 1935 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/6)

Disposal of Household refuse. Met Mr Collier and Mr Dudley of Messrs Collier and Co of Marks Tey brick manufacturers, re their possibly taking all District House refuse. Says could definitely do it November to March but not interested in summer. Various arrangements considered. If necessary to dump temporarily, then would have to be the ‘old dump in the allotment field at Maldon Road’ where hopper could be put up. Adjourn to show them it.

 

UDC Finance and General Purposes Committee, 26 March 1935 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/7)

page 1. Tree at Maldon Road allotment field belonging to UDC, fell on Mr Loveday’s property. Surveyor got ‘certain unemployed men’ to take top of tree. Nothing offered for trunk by Mr A E Gaymer, timber merchant, or by Mr Loveday. So tell Mr Loveday he can have it if he repairs the fence.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 19 September 1935 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/7)

page 133. Bungalows for aged persons. OK to appropriate part of old cemetery site now used as allotments for this, ‘the proposed appropriation of the half acre of the Rickstones Road Recreation Ground not being practicable’ [this became Homefield Road]. Report what accommodation can be got ‘on the land at the top of the cemetery, recently hired to Mr G F Thompson’.

 

UDC Housing Committee, 9 November 1935 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/7)

page 175. Met at allotments part of Cocks Farm. Has been suggested that they be put into gardens of houses on side of Cressing Road nearest railway. Can’t recommend.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 19 November 1935 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/7)

page 205. Allotments. Preparations now to move holders of allotments at cemetery site to land adjoining cemetery site ‘recently occupied by Mr G F Thompson.’

 

UDC Public Health Committee, 17 December 1935 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/7)

pages 212-213. Collection of house refuse, re July report. Choose scheme 1 and buy a Ford vehicle. Maldon Road tip. Old gravel tip in the allotment field, Maldon Road, rapidly filling. Only another 4 months available. Investigate others.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 19 December 1935 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/7)

page 229. Of the 29 allotment holders to be displaced from old cemetery field because of Aged persons bungalows [Homefield Road], 13 have asked for alternative plots, and 2 new applications. Ask tenants on Cressing Road if they want any.

200 sheep strayed onto the Maldon Road allotments from adjoining meadow. Extensive damage to ‘green-stuff’ of holders. Ask tenants to approach Clerk to take action.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 16 January 1936 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/7)

page 249. Allotments Maldon Road. Mr A J Horner’s sheep were the ones that strayed. He complained about Clerk’s officious letter. Committee support the Clerk.

page 250. More on numbers of people for allotments in Rickstones Road.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 13 February 1936 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/7)

page 290. Layout for 18 allotments adjoining Cemetery submitted. Ask for another layout for 24, with gate to Recreation Ground.

 

UDC Public Health Committee, 15 December 1936

pages 619-620. Allotments. Certificates from Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries. Schedule of existing allotments, i.e.

Little Elms, part allotments, part arable, 3.36 acres

Braintree Road, 3.42 acres

Maldon Road, 5.48 acres, part allotments, part gravel pit now being worked.

Hoo Hall Rivenhall, 1.40 acres

Another list of land reserved for allotments:

Cuppers Farm to replace temporary ones at Bridge Home, 4.2 acres

Bridge Homes, existing temporary ones, 3.79 acres

Maldon Road, arable, to replace existing temporary allotments, 7.47 acres

Chipping Hill, existing temporary allotments 1.8 acres.

 

UDC Public Health Committee, 16 March 1937 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/7)

page 716. Allotments. Strutt and Parker agree to small portion of land next Bridge Home being reserved for permanent allotments.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 18 March 1940 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/9)

[page 268] To offer vacant plots in Maldon Road to military as allotments on rent free basis.

 

UDC Housing Committee, 22 April 1940 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/9)

[page 278] Church Street housing site. Undeveloped land adjoining Glebe Crescent. Some let for allotments but 4 acres left and Council obliged to cultivate it. To let to Mr L D Blake of Spring Lodge.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 19 September 1940 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/9)

[page 379] Allotments at Maldon Road. Some not used. Offer for keeping chickens if they are ‘properly fenced in’.

 

UDC Public Health Committee, 11 January 1941 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/9)

[page 458] Sewer damaged, near river in Powers Hall Road allotment field. Broken by enemy action. Excavate by crater. To be repaired.

 

UDC 26 May 1941 page 523 (ERO D/UWi 1/1/5)

(page 524) Re unsatisfied demand for allotments, Ministry of Agriculture has authorised entrance upon land in Collingwood Road belonging to Mrs Peecock. Managed to persuade Mr Morgan to release additional land at Rickstones Road allotment field (Mr M is a market gardener).

 

12 Jun 1941, message Braintree Report Centre to Essex County Control, 05.38/05.42 (ERO C/W/1/2/8)

Further to my Situation report of 05.15 hours, Witham report searched Towers [Powers] Hall End Blunts Hall. No more craters found. Later, further crater on allotments at back of Fyfield [Highfield] Road. [Added in different hand:] ‘?Highfield’

 

UDC Public Health Committee, 6 November 1941 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/9)

[page 668] Completed inspecting railings and recommend the following for inclusion [the table is quoted exactly in these notes].

Cemetery Witham UDC Division fence between cemetery and allotments. Cemetery entrance gates not to be removed

 

UDC Housing Committee, 17 November 1942 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

‘Witham and Rivenhall End Allotment Holders and Garden Society’ complain of damage from cattle, people using the allotments as public footpath, and children climbing fences. Find out if there is a public footpath from Cherry Tree Crossing over the field to Faulkbourne.

 

UDC, 30 November 1942 (ERO D/UWi 1/1/5)

Estates Committee adopted except to alter to read three dead elm trees at far side of Maldon Road allotments instead of at the entrance.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 30 November 1942 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

[page 107] Circular from Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries about allotments. Committee consider Witham is doing all it can.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 14 December 1942 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

[page 114] ‘Witham and Rivenhall End Garden and Allotment Society’ have asked to use Maldon Road Recreation Ground on August Monday next year for ‘Fruit and Vegetable Show and possibly a Fun Fair’. OK subject to conditions.

 

UDC Holidays at Home Week Committee, 9 March 1943 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

[page 148] Agreed to have it Aug 2 to 7. Fruit and Vegetable show to be held on August Monday by the Society and also the Essex Federation of Allotment Societies joining in. Also ‘the local Rabbit Society’ is staging a show, and various other attractions. Large crowd expected. Dance in Public Hall on August Monday evening. Long list of people co-opted onto committee including Mrs S Eccleston, Mrs R Turner, Mrs C De Trense, Miss L Croxall, Mrs V Grape. Clerk to communicate with Messrs Keith Prowse Ltd ‘as to Entertainers and Variety Shows available during the Week’.

 

Finance and General Purposes Committee, 16 March 1943 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

[page 161] ‘Witham and Rivenhall End Garden and Allotment Holders Society. They asked for financial assistance for show on Aug Monday. It is to be some magnitude as Essex Federation of Allotment Societies with over 70 branches and 26,000 members is taking part. Essex Institute of Agriculture also supports, and prominent members of Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries will also be present. Also Witham Rabbit Society to have a show ‘open to the Country’ and Essex Garden Produce Committee require space for demonstration, and ditto Ministry of Food. If they have bad weather they could lose money. Agree to support if Ministry says OK.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 19 June 1943 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

[page 202] Allotments generally well cultivated. A few partly uncultivated; consult the owners. Entrance to Maldon Road field and ‘the vacant land immediately adjoining thereto which was formerly used for gravel excavations needs scything’. To be done when possible but ‘the majority of the labour is still engaged out of the district’.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 6 September 1943 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

[page 220] Witham and Rivenhall End Garden and Allotment Holders Society want to hire hall for day on September 25th re ‘Victory Garden and Produce show’. Proceeds to Red Cross Agriculture fund. Just charge overheads.

[page 221] Wartime allotments, Collingwood Road. Mr C W Hodges already occupies one plot by arrangement with Mrs Peecock, has also occupied adjoining piece ‘the subject of part of the Council’s requisition’. Mr Hodges also ‘allowing his fowls to run upon the chase-way leading to the allotments’. Also blocked up top of chaseway though has left room for barrows. Chairman to inspect.

 

UDC Finance and General Purposes Committee, 14 September 1943 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

[page 235] Thanks from Witham and Rivenhall End Garden and Allotment Holders Society for interest in show on 2 August. Quite successful so no need for Council to cover loss.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 3 November 1943 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

[page 258] Land adjoining the Peculiar People’s Chapel. In September, Committee recommended willow trees on river bank and agreed. Also consideration re use for allotments but decided too much trouble.

Maldon Road allotments. Inspected because of complaint about cattle ‘straying and eating the produce thereon’. Justified. The cattle had broken the fence. Has been repaired with ‘second hand barbed wire’.

Church Street allotments to be inspected. Formerly in very bad state.

 

UDC 7 December 1943, in Committee (ERO D/UWi 1/1/5)

Town and Country Planning. ‘The Council at this meeting considered generally the planning of the Urban District, and in particular Witham Town and Silver End. A report of the Surveyor on the Subject was taken into consideration’. Resolved …

(c) ‘In providing for future housing estates of any description proper zones be marked to ensure of recreational and allotment facilities’.

 

UDC Housing Committee, 15 February 1944 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

[page 326] Surveyor’s report. Post War Housing Schemes. Enough land in Church Street and Glebe Crescent already in possession of Council for about 100 houses and 16 bungalows. Normally this would be enough for at least one year’s programme. Rate of building after War uncertain though Government has said ‘four million houses will be required in the 12 years after the War’. But how much at beginning not known. Cost will be higher than before. Unless Local Authorities get help, the rentals will have to be higher than present rentals. Re sewers and water mains, already there at Glebe Crescent and Church Street which would just need extending. Can’t be done just now because land used for agriculture and allotments. If the latter are taken away, alternative allotments will be needed probably.

 

UDC Housing Committee, 13 March 1945 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

[page 504] Church Street allotments. Site may be needed for housing any time. So terminate agreement with the allotment holders and with Mr L D Blake at end of September. Can then be cultivated free by them until needed for housing.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 13 March 1945 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

Allotments, cemetery site. Mr T W Morgan of 147 Cressing Road wishes to give up part of land he hires there. Arrangements for Mr Hugh Page to farm it not yet made because of Mr Morgan’s illness, but hope to arrange shortly.

 

UDC 26 March 1945, page 729 (ERO D/UWi 1/1/5)

Housing Committee, item re. Church Street allotments referred back.

 

UDC Housing Committee, 15 May 1945 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

[page 524] Church Street allotments. Agreements not terminated as agreed before because land not anticipated to be needed before September next.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 15 May 1945 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

[page 527] Witham and Rivenhall End Garden and Allotment Society want the Recreation Ground and Park on 14 July for Flower and Vet Show. Agreed.

 

UDC Housing Committee, 24 September 1945 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

[page 587] Church Street housing. Give notice to quit to allotment holders and the agricultural tenant.

 

John Newnan

John said that in his day at the station (1950s) the station allotments were called ‘Canada’, people would say they were going to Canada. But this probably applied to some on the other side of the line, near the maltings.

 

Ordnance Survey Six Inch Maps, early 1950s

Include “allotment gardens” at:

Between Cemetery, Manor Road in south, and Elm Farm in north (now part of Rickstones playing field)

At the end of Homefield Road

Powershall End, what is now Saxon Drive

At west end of Powershall End, behind the houses on the south.

Hatfield Road, small, next to Bridge Home

Hatfield Road, small, behind houses opposite Bridge Home

Hatfield Road, small, behind Ivy Chimneys

Maldon Road, west side, behind houses, now the southern Sports ground.

 

NB Cut Throat Lane not named as allotments

 

 

Braintree and Witham Times, 6 January 1955

Ringing old year out at parish church; allotment dinner (from Maurice Smith index)

 

Braintree and Witham Times, 23 December 1965

Allotments, lack of interest (from Maurice Smith index, I don’t have any more info.)

 

1980s

O.S. 1:2500 map, nothing marked at the site of  the Cut Throat Lane allotments – it could just have been omitted. Didn’t look at other sites.

 

1990s

O.S. 1:2500 map, Cut Throat Allotments marked as allotments. Didn’t look at other sites.

 

 

Photos

 

Ref Date of photo Description Source
M605 April 1957 Part of air photo of Moat farm etc. taken from south-east. This part includes parts of Powershall End, Chipping Hill, the railway, Guithavon Valley, Collingwood Road and The Avenue, the fields later the Moat farm estate, and the allotments later the site of Saxon Drive. See also M1559-M1568. See link for key map. Horner, Patrick
M1559 April 1957 Part 1 of air photo of Moat farm etc. taken from south-east. This part includes top of Highfields Road including Highfields farm, and part of Powershall End including Spa Place, and part of the allotments which are now the site of Saxon Drive. See also M605 and M606. See link for key map. Horner, Patrick
M1560 April 1957 Part 2 of air photo of Moat farm etc. taken from south-east. This part includes fields now part of Moat farm housing estate, and part of the allotments which are now the site of Saxon Drive, between Highfields Road and the railway. Also part of the railway viaduct. See also M605 and M606. See link for key map. Horner, Patrick
M1564 April 1957 Part 6 of air photo of Moat farm etc. taken from south-east. This part includes Chipping bridge, 26 Chipping Hill, 28 Chipping Hill, 30 Chipping Hill, and church hall, west and of Powershall End including mill and Spring Lodge and 6 Powershall End, track to Faulkbourne, and part of allotments later site of Saxon Drive. See also M605 and M606. See link for key map. Horner, Patrick
M1565 April 1957 Part 7 of air photo of Moat farm etc. taken from south-east. This part includes Chippimg bridge, west side of Chipping Hill including Earlsmead and Pinkham’s glove factory, Moat farm chase including the farm and the bridge, the railway, river, and part of the allotments later site of Saxon Drive. See also M605 and M606. See link for key map. Horner, Patrick
M1787 1954 View from back of 128 Highfields Road to Chipping Hill, including house garden. The house at 128 was built the year before, in 1953, on an empty plot, for the Lepper family. Includes allotments in foreground behind garden fence. On extreme left, seen through window, is Spring Lodge (3 Powershall End). Left of centre in middle distance are the semi-detached houses at 6 Powershall End and 8 Powershall End, with Chipping bridge in centre. Just below horizon, towards the left perhaps 7 Church Street, left of centre the Vicarage, right of centre, parish church, to right of that, 26 Chipping Hill (left side of green), then on far right, 24 Chipping Hill and 22 Chipping Hill. Lepper, Helen and Alfred
M1788 1954 View from back of 128 Highfields Road to Chipping Hill, including house garden. The house at 128 was built the year before, in 1953, on an empty plot, for the Lepper family. Includes allotments in foreground behind garden fence. On extreme left are the semi-detached houses at 6 Powershall End and 8 Powershall End, with Chipping bridge in centre. On horizon, towards the left the Vicarage, above the bridge, parish church, to right of that, 26 Chipping Hill (left side of green), 24 Chipping Hill and 22 Chipping Hill (behind the green), end wall of 55 Chipping Hill on right hand side of road, and to right backs of houses at Chipping Hill. Extreme right is Moat farm house. Lepper, Helen and Alfred
M1819 24th September 1966 Opening of new Fire Station, Hatfield Road. Seen from top of tower, looking down on back of fire station. Allotments in background. By table on left are Alderman G E Rose, chairman of County Fire Brigade Committee (standing) and Councillor Ted Smith, chairman of Witham Urban District Council (with chain, in middle). Seated in second row from front, 4th from right, is Frank Ager (just to right of lady with hat sitting behind him). See also photo M390. Colin Ager via Brian Knight.
M2239 1954-1965 St Nicholas church and Chipping Hill, seen from the allotments where Saxon Drive has since been built. Houses visible to right of tall trees are what is now 28 Chipping Hill (formerly Mole End), 26 Chipping Hill, and end of 55 Chipping Hill (bare). See link 1 for information about numbering, dating, etc. Scott-Mason, John

 

 

References to allotments in oral history interviews.

 

Mrs Edith Brown, born 1895

Tape 5

Q:        What, did he grow vegetables and things more or ….?

Mrs Brown:  Yea, well, we had a big allotment and he used to grow his celery at home (Q:  Yea.) erm, used to have a flower garden all the way down, wide piece, and round like that, both sides (Q:  Yea.) and then at the back of the, then he had tall chrysanths, then at the back he used to have a celery, two celery trenches, one either side, then he used to grow white and pink celery, they used to be them days, that was lovely.  Course, we had, course we had to take all our celery up weekends, then he had the allotment for all the vegetables he grew, you know, grew all his own vegetables, I forget where the allotment was then, been so many years ago.  (Mrs S:  Wasn’t it down where Mr North ….)  Down Maldon Road somewhere.  (Mrs S: Not North, Mr ….the shoe, the shoemaker, Horrocks[?].) [Hollick]  Down there somewhere, Grace, couldn’t tell you exactly where it was now, I forget, but I know we had a big allotment, (Mrs S:  Yes.) used to grow stuff for all the winter, (Mrs S:  Course there’s so many houses down there isn’t there?) and store it all.  Hey?  (Mrs S:  So many houses built down there now.)  Mm, he used to clamp all his erm, oh, dear, (Mrs S:  Potatoes.) no, not potatoes (Mrs S:  Beetroot.) yes, beetroot and parsnips, used to clamp all them up with straw and earth (Q:  Yea, yea.) and then you just got ‘em out when you want ‘em.

Q:        So you wouldn’t have to buy much then?

Mrs Brown:  Mother, I don’t think my mother had to buy, we didn’t, did we?  (Mrs S:  No, not really [???].)  My husband, we had (Mrs S:  [???], Church Street.) we erm, we never bought a thing hardly, now and again we’d buy a swede wouldn’t we?  (Mrs S:  No[?] swede.)  But otherwise we never bought no potatoes or onions and everything used to be, you know, kept and, my husband used to go Sunday mornings cut the greens for the dinner all fresh.  We had Brussels sprouts or, all sorts and Mr Springett done the same.

Tape 6

Mrs Brown:  No, not really, not a lot. He don’t like gardening. (Q: Oh, yes.) Had a great big allotment and he had a lovely garden at the house, we had a big piece each side, a lovely flower garden, so much flower garden and so much at the back, he used to grow all, grow celery and that at the back of the flowers, he used to have, like high chrysanths all the way round and then that, about that space was all sorts of flowers, we had some lovely [???] didn’t we and he used to have all crocuses and all sorts, lilies, my mum had them coloured lilies with the spots on (Mrs S: Tiger lilies weren’t they called?.) yea, lovely they were, she loved her flowers and little rose trees and he used to do all the gardening and he had a big allotment as well (Q: Mm, That would take lot [???].) grow, he used to grow, he used to do all our shoe mending. (Q: Oh, did he?) Mm, dad did, yes, my husband did too, he ….

 

Mrs Edith Raven, born 1893

Tape 10

Mrs Raven:  Yes, and I was praying all the way down that wall, that somebody’d give me a ha’penny. But they didn’t. So I took these beans back and I said, Mrs Doole said they’d be ‘Another ha’penny, dear’, so I said ‘Well, may I bring that in the morning?’ Because she knew us, you see, so she said ‘Yes, dear, on your way to school’. So when I got, I could see Father coming off that garden field where those houses are now. Up that hill, you know? You know where the Community …. ? [garden field was allotments where Saxon Drive now is].

Q:        Oh, I think I know, yes. Where the allotments were, yes.

Mrs R: Yes. They were the allotments. Well, we had forty rod on there.

Q:        That’s opposite the Community Centre you mean. (Mrs R: Yes) Yes.

Tape 13

Mrs Raven   Pop had got a bit of allotment over there and there was a man digging his bit next door. So this man said to Pop. He said ‘There’s a funeral on today.’ So Pop said ‘Oh is there?’ So Pop said ‘I wonder who that is?’ So this man said ‘That’s Herbert from the Labour [Exchange]’ So Pop said ‘I hope he’s got his cards with him!’ [Both laugh] I never forgot that, I thought that was dreadful.

Mrs Raven: And there was a pond up in this, um, up in this place where they’ve built those houses and that allotments, there [Saxon Drive, probably]. And he fell in there once or twice. They’d throw their bits and pieces. They knew he was soft enough to go and try and get ‘em, and go on the ice and he’d go. He’s dead and gone now. But you ….

 

Miss Ada Smith, born 1897

Tape 14

Q:         Did they used to grow vegetables and things?

Miss Smith: Oh, yes. (Q: In the garden?) In the allotment too, yes, I remember all the vegetables.

Q:         It must have been hard work, where did you have the allotment?

Miss Smith: Over the rail, by the railway, each side of the railway, main line railway, the allotments.

 

Mrs Elsie Hammond, born c.1900

Tape 23

Mrs Hammond:      Oh well, that’s funny thing, but my mother used to lay on a big meal, in a way. Make a pot of tea. Have cups of tea. There might be soused mackerel. This time of year, there’d be salads and, I, I think that was her best meal of the day because she’d been busy in the daytime. I’ve always thought that. But or, beetroot and cheese, all that sort of thing. We used to live alright like that. You see, but that’d probably be produce really from the garden, or the allotment.

Q:       You had an allotment, did you?

Mrs Hammond:      My father had an allotment, yes. That was a railway allotment. It was a piece of ground, it’s still there; it’s derelict. It’s the other side of the main line. We used to have to go over there to do it.

Q:       Did you have to help him?

Mrs Hammond:      I wasn’t, I was never, only to pick the stuff. Pick the beans, and pick up potatoes, or drop them, drop the potatoes in the first place. He used to have the long, rows and we used to drop them in, you see. And then that was bean picking, or, he didn’t grow peas cause we used to go pea picking. And they used to wangle enough home, so we didn’t used to. [laughing] Used to put some in the bucket with a coat on the top. [laughing] So they never had to grow peas, but all the other vegetables, cause they couldn’t really buy them, you see. Couldn’t afford to buy them. That’s how, people used to work their sets, you see. Potatoes, they used to do an exchange. People didn’t, couldn’t pay out a lot, they use to exchange, one with another. So they’d have a change of seed. It was the only way to work it.

 

Bert (Jim) Godfrey, born 1906

Tape 27

They had quite a big garden down Bridge Street, yes. Running up the back there, quite a long way. And then, where the fire station is, that was all an allotment field. He used to have a plot on there as well. Where he’d spend –he’d spend a lot of his spare time there.

 

Lucy Croxall, born 1903 and Eva Hayes, born 1893

Tape 29

Eva Hayes:   No, we had an allotment.

Lucy Croxall:         Our allotment, Father’s and your allotment was where Podsbrook is. All that belonged to Blyths the millers.

Eva Hayes:   Where the chapel is, there was a mill there. (LC: A flourmill) A flour mill, you see and of course where Alan McKirdy lived, that was their house, private house (LC: Lovely, it was) and all Podsbrook, all that piece was their garden. And Bernard the son lived where they live now, Peyton/Payton, lived over at Peyton. Bernard lived there and he didn’t want all that extra land so he let Father, Superintendent Lennon, (LC: The policeman) Mr Edwards at the White Hart and Mr Howlett, the organist, all had a piece (LC: (talking over) All four had that garden between them). I planted, I was going to say thousands, hundreds of bulbs in that field.

Lucy Croxall:         So now we say if any flowers come up at Podsbrook we believe they all belong to us. (Q laughs) Lovely garden wasn’t it?

 

Mrs Annie Ralling, born 1900

Tape 36

Q:       What about vegetables ?

Mrs Ralling  Well people had their own garden fields didn’t they. In those days everybody used to grown their own garden things. Like up Hatfield Road you know where the Fire Station is that was all allotments.

Q:       Usually it was the mother that did the shopping ?

Mrs Ralling: Yes, mostly, or they’d send the children. As I was saying, they used to have their own allotments, didn’t they, and gardens and they’d grow all their own vegetables often and that sort of thing. Funnily enough it is only just about a week ago there used to be two little men, you know I used to think they were like the dwarfs, they used to live in the town and they had a garden field or an allotment up Hatfield Road and I used to take their surplus [in her shop} and only about a fortnight ago I heard that the sister died. The two little men they used to have like a box on wheels, a barrow and they’d bring their marrows and cabbages and things like that. (Another voice ?) Of course they’ve built on them allotments now haven’t they. Yes all those houses up Hatfield Road.

 

Mr Maurice Greatrex, born 1903

Tape 49

Mr Greatrex:          No, father didn’t have time to do that. Grandfather wanted him to do the work here. (Q: I see, yes.) My father, he worked all the hours that he could in that business. Really worked hard all the time. When he wasn’t working in the business he was trying to run an allotment where all these houses are just down the road here. That glebe land that was sold by the Church [Saxon Drive]. Well we had an allotment on that, 20 foot[rod?] allotment on there which father used to keep going as well and, ‘cos there were eight of us in the family you see (Q: Quite.) and wages weren’t very high. They weren’t anything like they are nowadays. And so he had a job to keep things going.

 

Mr and Mrs Baxter,

Tape 80

Mrs B: We had several bombs drop about here, you know. Because up there – now where is it? Powershall Road – along Powershall Road because …
Mr B: Yes, I had an allotment up there.

Mrs B: That was all allotments.

Mr B: There was two bombs – they made a – they reckoned they were fastened together with a chain. There was a hole like that and a hole – you could put a house in them. In the two holes. Right in the allotments.

Mrs B: And that was our allotment and our neighbour’s allotment.

Mr Walter Peirce, born 1908

Tape 92

Mr Peirce:    …. [see picture 1] Highfields Road. Well, this was where the running pump, the running pump was, and back there was the dam, was the ramp that used to supply Blunts Hall and Highfields farm, up here. Well, they’re all gone now, ain’t they? (Q: Yes) See, well, that was all fields when I was a boy. This was the allotment. That’s all built upon [Saxon Drive]. (Q: That’s right) And then, um. there’s some houses, up here, Mr Richards the builder bought that one, and then there was, and then, then there was a couple of small little houses, and then you come into, um, well, Spa, Highfields Road, ’cos Spa Road has been built alongside, ain‘t it? (Q: Yeah). You still got the old Highfields Road, but that was always there but then um, when I um ….

Mr Peirce:    Now this may be interesting or may not [looking at photo, see picture 2]. That was when Crittall’s was built [Crittall’s window factory, Braintree Road]. (Q: Really). They were the workmen for Crittalls when that was built. ’Cos that used to be an allotment belonged to the Co-op. (Q: Oh did it? I see). Yes, if it hadn’t have been for the Co-op Crittall’s wouldn’t have been in Witham. (Q: Really, why’s that?) The Co-op sold the, well, Mrs Susannah Vaux, Bawtrees, and one or two of the …. noble, general, gentry people of Witham, they tried to keep Crittall’s out. They didn’t want no fact– didn’t want no factory in Witham at all. There was Pinkham’s factory. You know, the gentry people of Witham, they tried to keep Crittall’s out. They didn’t want no fact– didn’t want no factory in Witham at all. There was Pinkham’s factory. You know, the glove making factory. But they didn’t want no factory. But unfortunately, or fortunately, the Co-op sold the allotment to Crittall’s and that’s how Crittall’s started ….

Q:       Why the, was the Co-op very active – did it have a lot of land then, the Co-op?

Mr P Peirce: No, it only had that (Q: Oh, I see) that, all that allotment what run right up the back where the Co-op, that little Co-op, there was a little Co-op shop, wasn’t there [62 Braintree Road]? (Q: Yes). Well, all that land, right down to, to um, Albert Road. Matter of fact some of them houses in Albert, them houses in Albert Road belonged to the Co-op till the people bought them.

Mr Peirce:    Nineteen ten. Now this is my father on the wagon [see picture 6]. Now this (Q: Is it really?) Well I, I worked there for a little while in nineteen twenty six, or sev- yes, in nineteen sev, in nineteen twenty seven. I used to go round there with the horse and cart and I used to work at Bulford mill and all that. You see, well now, that’s the water mill and that’s the power mill, steam mill. (Q: Oh, I see). You see, now, that’s where the Evangelic church is, isn’t it? Now this here, was the allotment belonged to them, er, beehives and all that. Er, That’s where all the flats or something are built down there, ain’t they? [Podsbrook] Maisonettes. Ain’t they? (Q: I think, yes) Where you come ….

Mr Peirce:    Well, that, the other houses that side back on to it. Well, that used to be the cart lodge for Canon Ingles and Canon [i.e. present Church hall] (Q: Was it) And then where the, opposite the Spring Community Centre (Q: Yes) was allotments [now Saxon Drive]. Five shillings a year, my father used to have it. Twenty rod. Well, you paid the five shillings, and a potato. And you had a little bit of supper, all the, um, holders of the allotment. (Q: Oh I see,) You know, I told you (Q: Yes, yes,) where the footpath went through that allotment, and you went and paid it, Mr Hodges was the man, that took the money . He lived right, the other side of the railway line, near the Witham Creamery is, but a bomb dropped on it during the War, didn’t it? Blew it all to pieces. But they’ve rebuilt a new house, didn’t they [probably 20 Highfields Road]. Well, that was the man who used to take the money.

 

Mrs Hicks

Tape 99

Q: What did you used to make them with?

Mrs H: Great big stone bottles with a handle on the side. We used to make rhubarb but I don’t like that, and dandelion. Ooh that was lovely. Better than any whisky if you keep it a year. I made some of that once and blackberry, damson, all sorts I used to make. I don’t like, that used to be rhubarb, really, because they grew that on the allotment, and you see that didn’t cost anything. Only just the sugar, well the sugar wasn’t only about sixpence a pound then. You could do what you liked.
Ted Mott

Tape 103

Mr M: I used to have a piece of an allotment down Maldon Road when they had allotments down there, from up here. Because it was a family piece of allotment. A good piece you see. I used to trundle off down there with Keith on the front on a Saturday morning, stay down there till dinner time and come home. Just have an early breakfast and go down. He used to do a Sunday paper round, go up the shop here. I used to help him down as far as where the allotments were and then do the allotment. He used to come back up there.
Walter Peirce

Tape 110

Well, I used to go to the matinee, Saturday afternoon, three ha’pence. And this was after the war, after the First War, of course. And there was a lot of horses about then, see. And there was a big goods yard then, ain’t got that now, used to be a big goods yard wound by Cooper Tabers, seed merchants. Well, my father had this allotment and he said he’d give me a ha’penny for a barrow-load of horse manure. Well, we used to have Tate & Lyle sugar boxes, that’s what they were then. Used to get them at the grocer’s on a pair of perambulator wheels. With two handles on the side, that was [???]. Then we used to go along the road with a shovel and brush and fill it up. Well, I know I used to take it up the allotment and push it on a heap. So Father used to say ‘‘How many loads you took today, boy?’ ‘Oh, three of them’. ‘Three?’ ‘Yes, three’. That was three ha’pence. I could go to the pictures couldn’t I?

Tape 125

And then you come round the bend and that is Cressing Road. Well, all that field belonged to John Brown. So the Witham Council bought it, didn’t they? And they bought all that field and then they bought this field here, what’s called Homefield. That was my allotment. I had two bits of allotment there. That was our allotment, you see and that’s called Homefield. Well, all that used to belong to John Brown and the Council bought it all.
Mr Ken Miller

Tape 187

Well Henry’s father was a great poacher, well not poacher, but rabbiter and lived by the gun sort of thing, and there was a hare that used to elude him in the garden fields, of course the allotment holders wanted it caught because of the damage it was doing. And down opposite Spring Lodge, there was a five bar wooden gate, I can see it now, and, into the allotments, and this gate was always open for people coming and going on their bikes and trolleys and what have you. And this hare always got away across the road, cause it was, it was all fields across the road then, and the hare’d get away. So one day he shut the gate, and the hare ran full belt into the gate, and he got it, killed it. And Henry always used to spin this tale, and how his father got that, cause he was a great big tall bloke, and as I can remember he used to call on his bike, and, he was a bricklayer for Crittall’s, and I used to sharpen his chisels for him.

 

 

 

Mr John Newman

Tape 191

[re Station Maltings]

For some reason that little bit of ground was always known as Canada (Questioner: Known as what?) Canada. Yes, that piece of ground just there was always known as Canada. There were some allotments there as well. ‘Oh’, he says, ‘I’ve got an allotment on Canada’, so you knew where his allotment was.

 

 

 

http://www.inbrief.co.uk/neighbour-disputes/allotments.htm

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/10774314/Allotments-being-sold-off-for-development-despite-government-pledges.html

 

 

Email from Richard Pilbrow

richardpilbrow+allot-sec

 

Dear Janet,

 

It has been suggested that you may be able to help us in our research concerning how and when the Cut Throat Lane Allotment site was set up, by whom, and whether or not it directly replaced much older allotments on the other side of the main railway line which we believe were statutory allotments.

 

If you are willing and able to assist us it will be very much appreciated.  Our enquiry arises because Braintree District Council in their efforts to drive down operating costs are encouraging us to self-manage the Cut Throat Lane allotments on a long lease.  That is fine in principle, but they state that the site is currently classified as “temporary allotments” and they intend to refer to the allotments in the lease as “Community Land”.  They include a clause that allows them to take back the land after giving us 12 months notice, and excludes any obligation on the Council’s part to seek to find us an alternative site should they do so.  We believe that the Cut Throat Lane allotments, by their historical associations, are statutory allotments and should be referred to in the lease as “allotment gardens” and not as “community Land”.  Should we be able to prove that the allotments are “statutory” not “temporary”, whilst the Council can still take back the land by giving 12 months notice, it becomes under an obligation to try to find a suitable alternative land for use as allotments (which is commonly now achieved via section 106 planning agreements when new housing estates are developed).

 

We are very wary of entering into the contract as proposed since we believe that if we should do so, the land could quite easily be appropriated for any alternative use that the Council can demonstrate serves a “community purpose”, and deplete even further the land that has been lost to development in the Witham area.

 

Certainly the Cut Throat Lane site replaced others in Witham, including the old site on the opposite side of the railway which was almost certainly statutory allotment land.  We do know that what is now Cut Throat Lane Allotments was previously a seed trials ground occupied by Thomas Cullen & Sons.  Cullens closed their Witham operation (after mergers or takeovers) in 1983.  However it appears that allotment gardens use of the land that is now Cut Throat Lane allotments commenced before that year as Ordnance Survey maps show the area as “allotment gardens” in 1978 (but it was still seemingly Cullens seed trial fields in 1971).

 

 

We would like to be able to read Council Minutes dating back to the time the old allotments on the opposite side of the railway were taken back by the Council to be developed for industrial/commercial use (what is now part of Eastways Industrial Estate).  This may have been under Witham Council control, or under Braintree District Council (following the Local Government Act 1972 when Town Council land holdings transferred to District Councils).  We also would like to be able to read contemporary Council Minutes from the time the Cut Throat Lane site was appropriated for allotment use.  It appears to have been part of a development deal for the whole portion of former agricultural land that now forms the housing estate bordered by Conrad Road, Forest Road, Cut Throat Lane and the Branch railway line from Witham to Braintree.

 

If you do feel you can help us with some dates to narrow down our search through Council Minutes it will be so much appreciated.  If there is evidence in your possession that we could photograph or photocopy that would be even better.

 

We have not met but I am more than happy to come and meet you if discussion would be the best way forward.

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard Pilbrow

 

Secretary, Witham Allotment and Leisure Gardeners Association.

 

Copy addressees are our Chairman, Richard Playle, and Treasurer, David Youngman

 

 

Allotments

 

Oddments

 

How big is an allotment? (www.nsalg.org.uk/allotment-info/ )

An allotment is traditionally measured in rods (perches or poles), an old measurement dating back to Anglo-Saxon times. 10 poles is the accepted size of an allotment, the equivalent of 250 square metres or about the size of a doubles tennis court.

 

1841 Tithe map

Cut Throat Lane – field belonged to Freeborns farm that is now allotments.

 

1841

ERO Accession A5404. ‘Bramston scrapbooks’, Book 1, greenish cover, page 19 of notes

Poster

‘To the Poor Inhabitants of Witham. Notice is hereby given that it is intended to divide a Field, near Chipping Hill Bridge, called Knee Field, into allotments of garden ground not exceeding 20 rods. Any person wishing to hire an Allotment of 10 or 20 rods is requested to apply immediately to Mr Wade at the National School, who will set down the applicant’s name, and give him information   ‘ [information not specified]. Occupation on 1 November next .John Bramston, Oct 1841.

Pro-forma

‘Witham Field Gardens. Allotment no —, — Rods of Ground. Yearly Rent —s —d  and one Potato’.

Conditions, include:

‘No Work … On Lords Day or Christmas Day or Good Friday’

Not to under-let without permission.

No buildings or trees allowed.

Keep neat.

No ploughing.

Not more than half of ground to have potatoes.

Gates kept locked.

No children except to work. Damages ‘by them to be made good by the Parent’.

If dishonest or injury to other tenant, or convicted of any offence against law, or reach rules, landlord can take possession.

To be signed and witnessed.

 

1842-72

Surrey History Centre: Earls of Onslow of Clandon Park, Estate Papers

Earls of Onslow of Clandon Park, West Clandon: Estate papers of the 4th and 5th Earls of Onslow

Catalogue Ref.1320

Allotment hiring card for Witham Field Gardens, with conditions and record of lettings 1847-1872 – ref.1320/418/5? – date: [c1887]
From web site of A2A, Access to Archives: Http://www.a2a.pro.gov.uk/search/docframe.asp?styletype=xsl&i=110&filename=xsl\A2A_com.xsl&com=1

 

Dr Dixon’s diary, Saturday, November 12 1842

Corn Markets higher, but the Cattle fair to day at Chelmsford was dull indeed, but very few sales at very low prices, but probably not so low as they seem likely to settle down to. I find that in North Essex the farmers are determined to keep pace in lowering poor mens wages with the Cattle and Corn. Labour there is now 14d per day! Being 8/ per week!! And the allotments let to labourers (being prohibited in many instances from growing ??? straw crops) is charge to them 6d per rod or £4 per acre. The farmers who underlet in this way giving for the same land 25/ or 30/ per acre! Our labour here is paid at the rate of 11/ per week by the day with small beer. By the by some of my neighbours lay claim to an excessive amount of charity in letting out these allotments to Agricultural labourers. Our Vicar the Reverend Mr. Bramston held his rent audit in his Coach House last Friday evening. The Entertainment consisted of roast mutton (alias baked), plum-puddings, ale and Bacca. The number of Tenants 70 (or about that). Bramston presided with his Curate Mr. Fagun as vice. The quantity of land in each holding is ?  rods for which these poor people pay 8d per rod!! Which is at the rate of £5:6.8 per acre!!! The Landlord paying Tithe Rate and other outgoings. The parson in taking his charity garment out of this affair will have but a thin covering for his sins!

In his predecessors time 6 years ago this land was let to a farmer for 30/ per acre.

 

Dr Dixon’s diary, Sunday September 14th, 1845

The accounts from all quarters state the potato crop to be most destructively diseased. I have taken up one piece of Pink eyed Kidneys and not one in ten are sound. I have some I hope much better but some which were taken up a fortnight since supposed to be unaffected are beginning to decay and I have great apprehensions that the failure will be much greater than is feared. This must prove a heavy calamity to the Poor as the potato crop in the allotment gardens is to them of much moment.

 

Dr Dixon’s diary, Wednesday September 24th, 1845

Weather yesterday & today fine with sharp frosts in the morning which has cut down the potatoes when they were not previously destroyed by the murrains – I have determined not to take up mine for some time. I think they will be riper in the ground, such of them as are not rotten. In the allotments or field gardens of the poor I calculate that two thirds of the crop is destroyed and I very much fear that those which appear sound are not so and that they will rot in a few weeks. The new varieties appear to me to suffer least. Some of our old sorts have entirely perished from the disease or murrain. At present if well steamed with a little salt they agree with my sows & pigs but they hardly eat them raw. It is now said that this disease made its appearances in some districts last year and that it may prove fatal in following years.

 

Dr Dixon’s diary, Thursday October 9th, 1845

Rain at intervals during the day, which being our ploughing match & meeting for prizes for cottage gardens, allotments etc. dampened the proceedings in the field at Mr Hutley. But few ladies could attend. We dined afterwards at White Hart Lord Raleigh in the Chair. A smart speaking  conversation on farming & matters connected with the society followed in the evening. Quite enough talkers. Farmers can make speeches such as their ancestors little dreamed of.

 

Dr Dixon’s diary, Wednesday January 7th, 1846

This has been a mild, cheerful day like April, the winds of December quite hushed – not so the political world. Meetings in favour of Corn Laws continue to be held in various places but the high tone of the actors in them is fast coming down & meetings for a repeal (total) gain strength & power every day. At a village in Wiltshire a meeting in the evening of the labourers has been held of which a full report in the Times of this day. They assembled in the road & a labourer was called to the Chair. Resolutions were moved & seconded in a regular manner with speeches by labourers & if the Tale they told be true a more monstrous system of oppression is not to be found in History. One circumstance particularly requires notice namely that allotments let to the poor pay at least double rents to the same land let to common tenants. The same occurs here our Vicar Mr Bramston let land to the poor at the rate of £5 per acre!! By our previous vicar this land was let to a farmer for 30/. Lord Rayleigh also lets a field in this parish to the poor for upwards of £5 per acre. This is called charity forsooth!! I wonder if the Parson can find a passage in the Bible to sanction this.

 

Dr Dixon’s diary, Wednesday, March 10, 1847

A very sharp frost this morning and all the drain pipes made these two last days frozen & destroyed, & my men today have suspended work. The spring vegetables Brocoli lettuce &c are fast perishing under this severe weather which added to the potato failure presses heavily upon the poor labourer who cultivates his allotment piece & for wh. here he commonly pays a double rent to the Landlord, that is double what a tenant farmer pays. Wheaten bread is now well nigh our only resource for food.

 

Dr Dixon’s diary, Friday, April 30, 1847

Corn Markets at Chelmsford today firm. I sold one parcel of red wheat at 84/- & another at 83/-. Our labourers almost literally live upon bread. No potatoes are left & cold late spring has destroyed much of the Cabbage tribe in their garden allotments. Many are hungry & half fed. This has however been a favorable week although not warm for the growth of vegetation. Moderate showers are more suitable to vegetation than hasty & heavy rains.

 

Dr Dixon’s diary, Sunday, September 26, 1847

The Anniversarys of the Agricultural Societys are now being held in this & other counties.  In some cases their meetings are entirely devoted to a public distribution of prizes to labourers & servants embracing every variety of farming & domestic engagements. & for the cultivation of garden allotments &c. In others prizes to farmers for best roots, cattle &c. Any common object which brings the different classes of society has a beneficial tendency but it unfortunately happens that Landlord & Tenants frequently meet only on these occasions in a Social Manner for many Landlords employ agents to make bargains for occupying land as well as to take rents getting away as much as possible from all intercourse with the parties with whose interests they are so much complicated & then again farmers keep as much aloof from their labourers & thus all parties try to break asunder the links which ought to bind them together.

 

 

UDC Building Committee, 21 March 1911, page 33 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/1)

Mr Blood be asked to name price for part of the former allotment field at Chipping Hill [this for building cottages].

 

UDC Building Committee, 24 March 1911, page 34 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/1)

Mr Blood offered frontage of the old allotment field in Church Street at £75 per acre. [this for building cottages].

 

30 January 1917, page 768, D/UWi 1/4/2 Urban District Council Letter Book

Council has considered extension of land for cultivation. Society’s field Pains Haven is suitable Do Society intend to cultivate it?

To Mr F Simpson, Secretary, Witham Co-op.

 

UDC 25 June 1917 (ERO D/UWi 1/1/3)

page 389. To get two sprayers for potatoes to prevent disease, for use of allotment holders. Invite applications for spraying at 3d per rod.

 

UDC 28 January 1918 (ERO D/UWi 1/1/3)

page 431. Letter from Essex War Agricultural Committee re ‘cultivation of as much land as possible in allotments’. No action necessary.

 

Essex Weekly News, 1 February 1918

page 4, col 3. Witham Urban District Council meeting.

Allotments. Captain Abrey proposed Council should use land purchased for cemetery, for allotments. Cemetery not required for years. Mr Garrett seconded. Chairman said notice required.

 

Essex Weekly News, 22 February 1918

page 6, col 3. Potato spraying. Mr F Griffiths from Food Production Department. Address in Congregational schoolroom. Mr E Smith presided. Recommended allotment holders etc to spray crops. Great increase in production would ensue.

 

UDC, 25 February 1918 (ERO D/UWi 1/1/3)

pages 437-38. Discussion how best to cultivate cemetery field, e.g. allotments. Decided to ask ‘Messrs Crittall if they would let their field in Braintree Road to the Council for purposes of allotments for duration of the war’.

 

Essex Weekly News, 1 March 1918

page 5, col 5. Witham Urban District Council Meeting, Mr P Hutley in chair.

Allotments. Mr Abrey moved rescinding decision not to use three acres of cemetery land for allotments. He approached by men who wanted allotments, and thought they should be encouraged. Mr W Taber seconded. Mr W Pinkham against – thought wrong to let – better to cultivate it themselves. Mr J E Smith agreed. Resolution defeated by chairman’s casting vote. Mr Pinkham proposed Committee appointed to cultivate the field . Carried by same vote. Re allotments, decided to ask Crittall Manufacturing Co to allow their building site at Chipping Hill to be used. Pinkham, Taber and Smith appointed as Allotment Committee.

 

UDC 25 March 1918 (ERO D/UWi 1/1/3)

page 445. ‘Read letter from Mr W Gardner of 12th inst. as to 7 acres of land of the Crittall Manufacturing Company Limited which was available for allotments.’ Ask press to record facts in their reports.

 

UDC 29 April 1918, Annual Meeting (ERO D/UWi 1/1/3)

page 452. Allotments. Interview with Mr Jacques Inspector of allotments from Food Production Department, Whitehall, and ‘inspection of Pans Haven field. Mr Gardner (agent for Messrs Crittall, the owners) also attended and stated that Messrs Crittall had received permission of the Government to commence building on the field at any time and he had received instructions to provide storage in the neighbourhood for the machinery etc which was ready. Also that arrangements had been made with the Great Eastern Railway Company to construct a Railway Siding’. Agreed that to explain to Mr J that Council willing to hire but would have to be short notice.

 

30 April 1918, page 963, D/UWi 1/4/2 Urban District Council Letter Book, 30 April 1918, page 963, D/UWi 1/4/2 Urban District Council Letter Book

To ‘Inspector Food Production Dept, Ipswich.’

Have seen Messrs Crittall’s agent (‘Mr Walter Gardner of this town’). Confirmed Messrs Crittall have Government permit to proceed with building on field, ‘which they may be obliged to exercise at any time, and that the Great Eastern Railway have undertaken to construct a siding from their line into the Works immediately Messrs Crittall request them to do so. He also stated that the plant and machinery, and a good part of the joinery, were already completed for erection’. He has tried to let it without much success, a few allotments only. Council willing to hire it if felt right to cultivate.

To ‘Inspector Food Production Dept, Ipswich.’

 

UDC Allotments Committee, 13 February 1920, page 30 [first one of this Committee noticed] (ERO D/UWi 1/2/2)

Application by resident in Chipping Hill for allotments. Mr H T Isted, representative of Lord Rayleigh, attended. Allotment Holders deputation of five also attended. They had named part of Moat Farm. They refused pieces in Highfields Road and near the Cemetery field. Deputation insisted on Council acquiring Moat Fm land under compulsory powers. Mr Isted suggested Mr J E Smith and his son Mr L E Smith should attend at Terling tomorrow at 10 a.m. to confer with Hon E G Strutt.

[continued on p 34] Application of residents in Maldon Road for allotments considered. Mr Bawtree willing to sell his field in Maldon Road now occupied by Mr Sorrell for £500. This considered excessive. Mr Pinkham to meet him.

Adopted

 

UDC Allotments Committee, 24 February 1920, page 32 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/2)

Letter from Mr H F Bawtree. After consultation with brother would sell field for £420, and if Council accepted would give Mr Sorrell notice. Agreed to accept if purchase price not more that £400.

Letter from Mr Isted. Mr Smith agreed to release the part of Moat farm required for allotments, ‘leaving it to the generosity of Mr Strutt in some way to make it up to him’. But Mr Smith said hadn’t had offer. Clerk to write to Lord Rayleigh about alternative land for Mr Smith.

Adopted

 

UDC Allotments Committee, 27 February 1920, page 35 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/2)

Mr Bawtree agreed to sell Maldon Road land for £400 and Mr Sorrell would relinquish. Agreed to purchase.

Re Chipping Hill, Mr L E Smith had letter; Mr Strutt would let him have Lenny’s Field if he would give up field at Moat Farm for allotments. But would have to wait till Michaelmas because Mr Strutt wanted to take crop at Lenny’s. But places in hands of council subject to compensation, and fence against cattle on either side of plot.

Chairman directed to see Housing Commissioner to urge confirmation of Compulsory Order re part of Cocks Farm as soon as possible, to enable Council to offer part of that to Committee.

Adopted

 

UDC Allotments Committee, 24 March 1920, page 42 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/2)

Maldon Road. Resolved to plough and disk harrow it. Then mark it up in 10 rod plots. No person to have more than one plot at present. Rent to be 8d a rod. Notice in Maldon Road to invite applications. Letter read from ‘the Witham and District Allotments Society’ suggesting field in Maldon Road be taken over by Society from Council  Decided not to entertain it.

Adopted

 

UDC Allotments Committee, 23 July 1920, page 56 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/2)

Complaints about cattle which ‘run into the Maldon Road allotment field from the road’. Gate and fence recommended.

Mr Pinkham had seen Mr S C Mayhew, Secretary of Witham and District Allotments Society, who said his Society required further land for allotments. Resolved to negotiate with Mr W Taber re field adjoining Cemetery field.

 

UDC Finance Committee, 29 May 1922, page 144 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/2)

Some moneys written off, i.e. owed for use of ambulance and for allotments.

 

UDC Roads Committee, 25 January 1924, page 274 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/2)

Allotment holders offered picked stones. Resolved to buy them for improving road leading to Brown’s Maltings. But don’t pay the holders whose rents are in arrears.

Adopted

 

UDC Estates Committee, 27 June 1924, page 321 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/2)

Some of Maldon Rd allotment land not used. A B Aldham offered to take on lease, at back of his premises, or to offer. Agreed to offer lease.

Adopted except for lease of allotment land, referred back

 

UDC Estates Committee, 22 January 1930 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/4)

page 322 Looking for allotment land to make up for what taken for housing in Guithavon Road. Mr Isted for Strutt and Parker would let 4 or 5 acres being part of field used as allotments next to Bridge Home, at back of and adjoining their field at present used for allotments. Negotiate.

 

Braintree and Witham Times, 31 January 1930, page 4

Urban District Council:

Guithavon Road estate. Mr Hodges wanted to buy his piece of allotment. Can’t because would interrupt building but would sell him ‘the spare piece of ground containing a disused gravel pit’.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 19 February 1930 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/4)

Don’t continue with hiring of land referred to before for allotments.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 18 February 1931 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/5)

page 142. Letter received re offering reduced prices for allotments to unemployed. To discuss with Witham Allotments Association. Mr F G Royce the secretary.

 

UDC Public Health Committee, 17 January 1935 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/6)

Disposal of Household refuse. Met Mr Collier and Mr Dudley of Messrs Collier and Co of Marks Tey brick manufacturers, re their possibly taking all District House refuse. Says could definitely do it November to March but not interested in summer. Various arrangements considered. If necessary to dump temporarily, then would have to be the ‘old dump in the allotment field at Maldon Road’ where hopper could be put up. Adjourn to show them it.

 

UDC Finance and General Purposes Committee, 26 March 1935 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/7)

page 1. Tree at Maldon Road allotment field belonging to UDC, fell on Mr Loveday’s property. Surveyor got ‘certain unemployed men’ to take top of tree. Nothing offered for trunk by Mr A E Gaymer, timber merchant, or by Mr Loveday. So tell Mr Loveday he can have it if he repairs the fence.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 19 September 1935 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/7)

page 133. Bungalows for aged persons. OK to appropriate part of old cemetery site now used as allotments for this, ‘the proposed appropriation of the half acre of the Rickstones Road Recreation Ground not being practicable’ [this became Homefield Road]. Report what accommodation can be got ‘on the land at the top of the cemetery, recently hired to Mr G F Thompson’.

 

UDC Housing Committee, 9 November 1935 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/7)

page 175. Met at allotments part of Cocks Farm. Has been suggested that they be put into gardens of houses on side of Cressing Road nearest railway. Can’t recommend.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 19 November 1935 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/7)

page 205. Allotments. Preparations now to move holders of allotments at cemetery site to land adjoining cemetery site ‘recently occupied by Mr G F Thompson.’

 

UDC Public Health Committee, 17 December 1935 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/7)

pages 212-213. Collection of house refuse, re July report. Choose scheme 1 and buy a Ford vehicle. Maldon Road tip. Old gravel tip in the allotment field, Maldon Road, rapidly filling. Only another 4 months available. Investigate others.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 19 December 1935 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/7)

page 229. Of the 29 allotment holders to be displaced from old cemetery field because of Aged persons bungalows [Homefield Road], 13 have asked for alternative plots, and 2 new applications. Ask tenants on Cressing Road if they want any.

200 sheep strayed onto the Maldon Road allotments from adjoining meadow. Extensive damage to ‘green-stuff’ of holders. Ask tenants to approach Clerk to take action.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 16 January 1936 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/7)

page 249. Allotments Maldon Road. Mr A J Horner’s sheep were the ones that strayed. He complained about Clerk’s officious letter. Committee support the Clerk.

page 250. More on numbers of people for allotments in Rickstones Road.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 13 February 1936 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/7)

page 290. Layout for 18 allotments adjoining Cemetery submitted. Ask for another layout for 24, with gate to Recreation Ground.

 

UDC Public Health Committee, 15 December 1936

pages 619-620. Allotments. Certificates from Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries. Schedule of existing allotments, i.e.

Little Elms, part allotments, part arable, 3.36 acres

Braintree Road, 3.42 acres

Maldon Road, 5.48 acres, part allotments, part gravel pit now being worked.

Hoo Hall Rivenhall, 1.40 acres

Another list of land reserved for allotments:

Cuppers Farm to replace temporary ones at Bridge Home, 4.2 acres

Bridge Homes, existing temporary ones, 3.79 acres

Maldon Road, arable, to replace existing temporary allotments, 7.47 acres

Chipping Hill, existing temporary allotments 1.8 acres.

 

UDC Public Health Committee, 16 March 1937 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/7)

page 716. Allotments. Strutt and Parker agree to small portion of land next Bridge Home being reserved for permanent allotments.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 18 March 1940 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/9)

[page 268] To offer vacant plots in Maldon Road to military as allotments on rent free basis.

 

UDC Housing Committee, 22 April 1940 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/9)

[page 278] Church Street housing site. Undeveloped land adjoining Glebe Crescent. Some let for allotments but 4 acres left and Council obliged to cultivate it. To let to Mr L D Blake of Spring Lodge.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 19 September 1940 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/9)

[page 379] Allotments at Maldon Road. Some not used. Offer for keeping chickens if they are ‘properly fenced in’.

 

UDC Public Health Committee, 11 January 1941 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/9)

[page 458] Sewer damaged, near river in Powers Hall Road allotment field. Broken by enemy action. Excavate by crater. To be repaired.

 

UDC 26 May 1941 page 523 (ERO D/UWi 1/1/5)

(page 524) Re unsatisfied demand for allotments, Ministry of Agriculture has authorised entrance upon land in Collingwood Road belonging to Mrs Peecock. Managed to persuade Mr Morgan to release additional land at Rickstones Road allotment field (Mr M is a market gardener).

 

12 Jun 1941, message Braintree Report Centre to Essex County Control, 05.38/05.42 (ERO C/W/1/2/8)

Further to my Situation report of 05.15 hours, Witham report searched Towers [Powers] Hall End Blunts Hall. No more craters found. Later, further crater on allotments at back of Fyfield [Highfield] Road. [Added in different hand:] ‘?Highfield’

 

UDC Public Health Committee, 6 November 1941 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/9)

[page 668] Completed inspecting railings and recommend the following for inclusion [the table is quoted exactly in these notes].

Cemetery Witham UDC Division fence between cemetery and allotments. Cemetery entrance gates not to be removed

 

UDC Housing Committee, 17 November 1942 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

‘Witham and Rivenhall End Allotment Holders and Garden Society’ complain of damage from cattle, people using the allotments as public footpath, and children climbing fences. Find out if there is a public footpath from Cherry Tree Crossing over the field to Faulkbourne.

 

UDC, 30 November 1942 (ERO D/UWi 1/1/5)

Estates Committee adopted except to alter to read three dead elm trees at far side of Maldon Road allotments instead of at the entrance.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 30 November 1942 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

[page 107] Circular from Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries about allotments. Committee consider Witham is doing all it can.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 14 December 1942 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

[page 114] ‘Witham and Rivenhall End Garden and Allotment Society’ have asked to use Maldon Road Recreation Ground on August Monday next year for ‘Fruit and Vegetable Show and possibly a Fun Fair’. OK subject to conditions.

 

UDC Holidays at Home Week Committee, 9 March 1943 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

[page 148] Agreed to have it Aug 2 to 7. Fruit and Vegetable show to be held on August Monday by the Society and also the Essex Federation of Allotment Societies joining in. Also ‘the local Rabbit Society’ is staging a show, and various other attractions. Large crowd expected. Dance in Public Hall on August Monday evening. Long list of people co-opted onto committee including Mrs S Eccleston, Mrs R Turner, Mrs C De Trense, Miss L Croxall, Mrs V Grape. Clerk to communicate with Messrs Keith Prowse Ltd ‘as to Entertainers and Variety Shows available during the Week’.

 

Finance and General Purposes Committee, 16 March 1943 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

[page 161] ‘Witham and Rivenhall End Garden and Allotment Holders Society. They asked for financial assistance for show on Aug Monday. It is to be some magnitude as Essex Federation of Allotment Societies with over 70 branches and 26,000 members is taking part. Essex Institute of Agriculture also supports, and prominent members of Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries will also be present. Also Witham Rabbit Society to have a show ‘open to the Country’ and Essex Garden Produce Committee require space for demonstration, and ditto Ministry of Food. If they have bad weather they could lose money. Agree to support if Ministry says OK.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 19 June 1943 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

[page 202] Allotments generally well cultivated. A few partly uncultivated; consult the owners. Entrance to Maldon Road field and ‘the vacant land immediately adjoining thereto which was formerly used for gravel excavations needs scything’. To be done when possible but ‘the majority of the labour is still engaged out of the district’.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 6 September 1943 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

[page 220] Witham and Rivenhall End Garden and Allotment Holders Society want to hire hall for day on September 25th re ‘Victory Garden and Produce show’. Proceeds to Red Cross Agriculture fund. Just charge overheads.

[page 221] Wartime allotments, Collingwood Road. Mr C W Hodges already occupies one plot by arrangement with Mrs Peecock, has also occupied adjoining piece ‘the subject of part of the Council’s requisition’. Mr Hodges also ‘allowing his fowls to run upon the chase-way leading to the allotments’. Also blocked up top of chaseway though has left room for barrows. Chairman to inspect.

 

UDC Finance and General Purposes Committee, 14 September 1943 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

[page 235] Thanks from Witham and Rivenhall End Garden and Allotment Holders Society for interest in show on 2 August. Quite successful so no need for Council to cover loss.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 3 November 1943 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

[page 258] Land adjoining the Peculiar People’s Chapel. In September, Committee recommended willow trees on river bank and agreed. Also consideration re use for allotments but decided too much trouble.

Maldon Road allotments. Inspected because of complaint about cattle ‘straying and eating the produce thereon’. Justified. The cattle had broken the fence. Has been repaired with ‘second hand barbed wire’.

Church Street allotments to be inspected. Formerly in very bad state.

 

UDC 7 December 1943, in Committee (ERO D/UWi 1/1/5)

Town and Country Planning. ‘The Council at this meeting considered generally the planning of the Urban District, and in particular Witham Town and Silver End. A report of the Surveyor on the Subject was taken into consideration’. Resolved …

(c) ‘In providing for future housing estates of any description proper zones be marked to ensure of recreational and allotment facilities’.

 

UDC Housing Committee, 15 February 1944 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

[page 326] Surveyor’s report. Post War Housing Schemes. Enough land in Church Street and Glebe Crescent already in possession of Council for about 100 houses and 16 bungalows. Normally this would be enough for at least one year’s programme. Rate of building after War uncertain though Government has said ‘four million houses will be required in the 12 years after the War’. But how much at beginning not known. Cost will be higher than before. Unless Local Authorities get help, the rentals will have to be higher than present rentals. Re sewers and water mains, already there at Glebe Crescent and Church Street which would just need extending. Can’t be done just now because land used for agriculture and allotments. If the latter are taken away, alternative allotments will be needed probably.

 

UDC Housing Committee, 13 March 1945 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

[page 504] Church Street allotments. Site may be needed for housing any time. So terminate agreement with the allotment holders and with Mr L D Blake at end of September. Can then be cultivated free by them until needed for housing.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 13 March 1945 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

Allotments, cemetery site. Mr T W Morgan of 147 Cressing Road wishes to give up part of land he hires there. Arrangements for Mr Hugh Page to farm it not yet made because of Mr Morgan’s illness, but hope to arrange shortly.

 

UDC 26 March 1945, page 729 (ERO D/UWi 1/1/5)

Housing Committee, item re. Church Street allotments referred back.

 

UDC Housing Committee, 15 May 1945 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

[page 524] Church Street allotments. Agreements not terminated as agreed before because land not anticipated to be needed before September next.

 

UDC Estates Committee, 15 May 1945 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

[page 527] Witham and Rivenhall End Garden and Allotment Society want the Recreation Ground and Park on 14 July for Flower and Vet Show. Agreed.

 

UDC Housing Committee, 24 September 1945 (ERO D/UWi 1/2/10)

[page 587] Church Street housing. Give notice to quit to allotment holders and the agricultural tenant.

 

John Newnan

John said that in his day at the station (1950s) the station allotments were called ‘Canada’, people would say they were going to Canada. But this probably applied to some on the other side of the line, near the maltings.

 

Ordnance Survey Six Inch Maps, early 1950s

Include “allotment gardens” at:

Between Cemetery, Manor Road in south, and Elm Farm in north (now part of Rickstones playing field)

At the end of Homefield Road

Powershall End, what is now Saxon Drive

At west end of Powershall End, behind the houses on the south.

Hatfield Road, small, next to Bridge Home

Hatfield Road, small, behind houses opposite Bridge Home

Hatfield Road, small, behind Ivy Chimneys

Maldon Road, west side, behind houses, now the southern Sports ground.

 

NB Cut Throat Lane not named as allotments

 

 

Braintree and Witham Times, 6 January 1955

Ringing old year out at parish church; allotment dinner (from Maurice Smith index)

 

Braintree and Witham Times, 23 December 1965

Allotments, lack of interest (from Maurice Smith index, I don’t have any more info.)

 

1980s

O.S. 1:2500 map, nothing marked at the site of  the Cut Throat Lane allotments – it could just have been omitted. Didn’t look at other sites.

 

1990s

O.S. 1:2500 map, Cut Throat Allotments marked as allotments. Didn’t look at other sites.

 

 

Photos

 

Ref Date of photo Description Source
M605 April 1957 Part of air photo of Moat farm etc. taken from south-east. This part includes parts of Powershall End, Chipping Hill, the railway, Guithavon Valley, Collingwood Road and The Avenue, the fields later the Moat farm estate, and the allotments later the site of Saxon Drive. See also M1559-M1568. See link for key map. Horner, Patrick
M1559 April 1957 Part 1 of air photo of Moat farm etc. taken from south-east. This part includes top of Highfields Road including Highfields farm, and part of Powershall End including Spa Place, and part of the allotments which are now the site of Saxon Drive. See also M605 and M606. See link for key map. Horner, Patrick
M1560 April 1957 Part 2 of air photo of Moat farm etc. taken from south-east. This part includes fields now part of Moat farm housing estate, and part of the allotments which are now the site of Saxon Drive, between Highfields Road and the railway. Also part of the railway viaduct. See also M605 and M606. See link for key map. Horner, Patrick
M1564 April 1957 Part 6 of air photo of Moat farm etc. taken from south-east. This part includes Chipping bridge, 26 Chipping Hill, 28 Chipping Hill, 30 Chipping Hill, and church hall, west and of Powershall End including mill and Spring Lodge and 6 Powershall End, track to Faulkbourne, and part of allotments later site of Saxon Drive. See also M605 and M606. See link for key map. Horner, Patrick
M1565 April 1957 Part 7 of air photo of Moat farm etc. taken from south-east. This part includes Chippimg bridge, west side of Chipping Hill including Earlsmead and Pinkham’s glove factory, Moat farm chase including the farm and the bridge, the railway, river, and part of the allotments later site of Saxon Drive. See also M605 and M606. See link for key map. Horner, Patrick
M1787 1954 View from back of 128 Highfields Road to Chipping Hill, including house garden. The house at 128 was built the year before, in 1953, on an empty plot, for the Lepper family. Includes allotments in foreground behind garden fence. On extreme left, seen through window, is Spring Lodge (3 Powershall End). Left of centre in middle distance are the semi-detached houses at 6 Powershall End and 8 Powershall End, with Chipping bridge in centre. Just below horizon, towards the left perhaps 7 Church Street, left of centre the Vicarage, right of centre, parish church, to right of that, 26 Chipping Hill (left side of green), then on far right, 24 Chipping Hill and 22 Chipping Hill. Lepper, Helen and Alfred
M1788 1954 View from back of 128 Highfields Road to Chipping Hill, including house garden. The house at 128 was built the year before, in 1953, on an empty plot, for the Lepper family. Includes allotments in foreground behind garden fence. On extreme left are the semi-detached houses at 6 Powershall End and 8 Powershall End, with Chipping bridge in centre. On horizon, towards the left the Vicarage, above the bridge, parish church, to right of that, 26 Chipping Hill (left side of green), 24 Chipping Hill and 22 Chipping Hill (behind the green), end wall of 55 Chipping Hill on right hand side of road, and to right backs of houses at Chipping Hill. Extreme right is Moat farm house. Lepper, Helen and Alfred
M1819 24th September 1966 Opening of new Fire Station, Hatfield Road. Seen from top of tower, looking down on back of fire station. Allotments in background. By table on left are Alderman G E Rose, chairman of County Fire Brigade Committee (standing) and Councillor Ted Smith, chairman of Witham Urban District Council (with chain, in middle). Seated in second row from front, 4th from right, is Frank Ager (just to right of lady with hat sitting behind him). See also photo M390. Colin Ager via Brian Knight.
M2239 1954-1965 St Nicholas church and Chipping Hill, seen from the allotments where Saxon Drive has since been built. Houses visible to right of tall trees are what is now 28 Chipping Hill (formerly Mole End), 26 Chipping Hill, and end of 55 Chipping Hill (bare). See link 1 for information about numbering, dating, etc. Scott-Mason, John

 

 

References to allotments in oral history interviews.

 

Mrs Edith Brown, born 1895

Tape 5

Q:        What, did he grow vegetables and things more or ….?

Mrs Brown:  Yea, well, we had a big allotment and he used to grow his celery at home (Q:  Yea.) erm, used to have a flower garden all the way down, wide piece, and round like that, both sides (Q:  Yea.) and then at the back of the, then he had tall chrysanths, then at the back he used to have a celery, two celery trenches, one either side, then he used to grow white and pink celery, they used to be them days, that was lovely.  Course, we had, course we had to take all our celery up weekends, then he had the allotment for all the vegetables he grew, you know, grew all his own vegetables, I forget where the allotment was then, been so many years ago.  (Mrs S:  Wasn’t it down where Mr North ….)  Down Maldon Road somewhere.  (Mrs S: Not North, Mr ….the shoe, the shoemaker, Horrocks[?].) [Hollick]  Down there somewhere, Grace, couldn’t tell you exactly where it was now, I forget, but I know we had a big allotment, (Mrs S:  Yes.) used to grow stuff for all the winter, (Mrs S:  Course there’s so many houses down there isn’t there?) and store it all.  Hey?  (Mrs S:  So many houses built down there now.)  Mm, he used to clamp all his erm, oh, dear, (Mrs S:  Potatoes.) no, not potatoes (Mrs S:  Beetroot.) yes, beetroot and parsnips, used to clamp all them up with straw and earth (Q:  Yea, yea.) and then you just got ‘em out when you want ‘em.

Q:        So you wouldn’t have to buy much then?

Mrs Brown:  Mother, I don’t think my mother had to buy, we didn’t, did we?  (Mrs S:  No, not really [???].)  My husband, we had (Mrs S:  [???], Church Street.) we erm, we never bought a thing hardly, now and again we’d buy a swede wouldn’t we?  (Mrs S:  No[?] swede.)  But otherwise we never bought no potatoes or onions and everything used to be, you know, kept and, my husband used to go Sunday mornings cut the greens for the dinner all fresh.  We had Brussels sprouts or, all sorts and Mr Springett done the same.

Tape 6

Mrs Brown:  No, not really, not a lot. He don’t like gardening. (Q: Oh, yes.) Had a great big allotment and he had a lovely garden at the house, we had a big piece each side, a lovely flower garden, so much flower garden and so much at the back, he used to grow all, grow celery and that at the back of the flowers, he used to have, like high chrysanths all the way round and then that, about that space was all sorts of flowers, we had some lovely [???] didn’t we and he used to have all crocuses and all sorts, lilies, my mum had them coloured lilies with the spots on (Mrs S: Tiger lilies weren’t they called?.) yea, lovely they were, she loved her flowers and little rose trees and he used to do all the gardening and he had a big allotment as well (Q: Mm, That would take lot [???].) grow, he used to grow, he used to do all our shoe mending. (Q: Oh, did he?) Mm, dad did, yes, my husband did too, he ….

 

Mrs Edith Raven, born 1893

Tape 10

Mrs Raven:  Yes, and I was praying all the way down that wall, that somebody’d give me a ha’penny. But they didn’t. So I took these beans back and I said, Mrs Doole said they’d be ‘Another ha’penny, dear’, so I said ‘Well, may I bring that in the morning?’ Because she knew us, you see, so she said ‘Yes, dear, on your way to school’. So when I got, I could see Father coming off that garden field where those houses are now. Up that hill, you know? You know where the Community …. ? [garden field was allotments where Saxon Drive now is].

Q:        Oh, I think I know, yes. Where the allotments were, yes.

Mrs R: Yes. They were the allotments. Well, we had forty rod on there.

Q:        That’s opposite the Community Centre you mean. (Mrs R: Yes) Yes.

Tape 13

Mrs Raven   Pop had got a bit of allotment over there and there was a man digging his bit next door. So this man said to Pop. He said ‘There’s a funeral on today.’ So Pop said ‘Oh is there?’ So Pop said ‘I wonder who that is?’ So this man said ‘That’s Herbert from the Labour [Exchange]’ So Pop said ‘I hope he’s got his cards with him!’ [Both laugh] I never forgot that, I thought that was dreadful.

Mrs Raven: And there was a pond up in this, um, up in this place where they’ve built those houses and that allotments, there [Saxon Drive, probably]. And he fell in there once or twice. They’d throw their bits and pieces. They knew he was soft enough to go and try and get ‘em, and go on the ice and he’d go. He’s dead and gone now. But you ….

 

Miss Ada Smith, born 1897

Tape 14

Q:         Did they used to grow vegetables and things?

Miss Smith: Oh, yes. (Q: In the garden?) In the allotment too, yes, I remember all the vegetables.

Q:         It must have been hard work, where did you have the allotment?

Miss Smith: Over the rail, by the railway, each side of the railway, main line railway, the allotments.

 

Mrs Elsie Hammond, born c.1900

Tape 23

Mrs Hammond:      Oh well, that’s funny thing, but my mother used to lay on a big meal, in a way. Make a pot of tea. Have cups of tea. There might be soused mackerel. This time of year, there’d be salads and, I, I think that was her best meal of the day because she’d been busy in the daytime. I’ve always thought that. But or, beetroot and cheese, all that sort of thing. We used to live alright like that. You see, but that’d probably be produce really from the garden, or the allotment.

Q:       You had an allotment, did you?

Mrs Hammond:      My father had an allotment, yes. That was a railway allotment. It was a piece of ground, it’s still there; it’s derelict. It’s the other side of the main line. We used to have to go over there to do it.

Q:       Did you have to help him?

Mrs Hammond:      I wasn’t, I was never, only to pick the stuff. Pick the beans, and pick up potatoes, or drop them, drop the potatoes in the first place. He used to have the long, rows and we used to drop them in, you see. And then that was bean picking, or, he didn’t grow peas cause we used to go pea picking. And they used to wangle enough home, so we didn’t used to. [laughing] Used to put some in the bucket with a coat on the top. [laughing] So they never had to grow peas, but all the other vegetables, cause they couldn’t really buy them, you see. Couldn’t afford to buy them. That’s how, people used to work their sets, you see. Potatoes, they used to do an exchange. People didn’t, couldn’t pay out a lot, they use to exchange, one with another. So they’d have a change of seed. It was the only way to work it.

 

Bert (Jim) Godfrey, born 1906

Tape 27

They had quite a big garden down Bridge Street, yes. Running up the back there, quite a long way. And then, where the fire station is, that was all an allotment field. He used to have a plot on there as well. Where he’d spend –he’d spend a lot of his spare time there.

 

Lucy Croxall, born 1903 and Eva Hayes, born 1893

Tape 29

Eva Hayes:   No, we had an allotment.

Lucy Croxall:         Our allotment, Father’s and your allotment was where Podsbrook is. All that belonged to Blyths the millers.

Eva Hayes:   Where the chapel is, there was a mill there. (LC: A flourmill) A flour mill, you see and of course where Alan McKirdy lived, that was their house, private house (LC: Lovely, it was) and all Podsbrook, all that piece was their garden. And Bernard the son lived where they live now, Peyton/Payton, lived over at Peyton. Bernard lived there and he didn’t want all that extra land so he let Father, Superintendent Lennon, (LC: The policeman) Mr Edwards at the White Hart and Mr Howlett, the organist, all had a piece (LC: (talking over) All four had that garden between them). I planted, I was going to say thousands, hundreds of bulbs in that field.

Lucy Croxall:         So now we say if any flowers come up at Podsbrook we believe they all belong to us. (Q laughs) Lovely garden wasn’t it?

 

Mrs Annie Ralling, born 1900

Tape 36

Q:       What about vegetables ?

Mrs Ralling  Well people had their own garden fields didn’t they. In those days everybody used to grown their own garden things. Like up Hatfield Road you know where the Fire Station is that was all allotments.

Q:       Usually it was the mother that did the shopping ?

Mrs Ralling: Yes, mostly, or they’d send the children. As I was saying, they used to have their own allotments, didn’t they, and gardens and they’d grow all their own vegetables often and that sort of thing. Funnily enough it is only just about a week ago there used to be two little men, you know I used to think they were like the dwarfs, they used to live in the town and they had a garden field or an allotment up Hatfield Road and I used to take their surplus [in her shop} and only about a fortnight ago I heard that the sister died. The two little men they used to have like a box on wheels, a barrow and they’d bring their marrows and cabbages and things like that. (Another voice ?) Of course they’ve built on them allotments now haven’t they. Yes all those houses up Hatfield Road.

 

Mr Maurice Greatrex, born 1903

Tape 49

Mr Greatrex:          No, father didn’t have time to do that. Grandfather wanted him to do the work here. (Q: I see, yes.) My father, he worked all the hours that he could in that business. Really worked hard all the time. When he wasn’t working in the business he was trying to run an allotment where all these houses are just down the road here. That glebe land that was sold by the Church [Saxon Drive]. Well we had an allotment on that, 20 foot[rod?] allotment on there which father used to keep going as well and, ‘cos there were eight of us in the family you see (Q: Quite.) and wages weren’t very high. They weren’t anything like they are nowadays. And so he had a job to keep things going.

 

Mr and Mrs Baxter,

Tape 80

Mrs B: We had several bombs drop about here, you know. Because up there – now where is it? Powershall Road – along Powershall Road because …
Mr B: Yes, I had an allotment up there.

Mrs B: That was all allotments.

Mr B: There was two bombs – they made a – they reckoned they were fastened together with a chain. There was a hole like that and a hole – you could put a house in them. In the two holes. Right in the allotments.

Mrs B: And that was our allotment and our neighbour’s allotment.

Mr Walter Peirce, born 1908

Tape 92

Mr Peirce:    …. [see picture 1] Highfields Road. Well, this was where the running pump, the running pump was, and back there was the dam, was the ramp that used to supply Blunts Hall and Highfields farm, up here. Well, they’re all gone now, ain’t they? (Q: Yes) See, well, that was all fields when I was a boy. This was the allotment. That’s all built upon [Saxon Drive]. (Q: That’s right) And then, um. there’s some houses, up here, Mr Richards the builder bought that one, and then there was, and then, then there was a couple of small little houses, and then you come into, um, well, Spa, Highfields Road, ’cos Spa Road has been built alongside, ain‘t it? (Q: Yeah). You still got the old Highfields Road, but that was always there but then um, when I um ….

Mr Peirce:    Now this may be interesting or may not [looking at photo, see picture 2]. That was when Crittall’s was built [Crittall’s window factory, Braintree Road]. (Q: Really). They were the workmen for Crittalls when that was built. ’Cos that used to be an allotment belonged to the Co-op. (Q: Oh did it? I see). Yes, if it hadn’t have been for the Co-op Crittall’s wouldn’t have been in Witham. (Q: Really, why’s that?) The Co-op sold the, well, Mrs Susannah Vaux, Bawtrees, and one or two of the …. noble, general, gentry people of Witham, they tried to keep Crittall’s out. They didn’t want no fact– didn’t want no factory in Witham at all. There was Pinkham’s factory. You know, the gentry people of Witham, they tried to keep Crittall’s out. They didn’t want no fact– didn’t want no factory in Witham at all. There was Pinkham’s factory. You know, the glove making factory. But they didn’t want no factory. But unfortunately, or fortunately, the Co-op sold the allotment to Crittall’s and that’s how Crittall’s started ….

Q:       Why the, was the Co-op very active – did it have a lot of land then, the Co-op?

Mr P Peirce: No, it only had that (Q: Oh, I see) that, all that allotment what run right up the back where the Co-op, that little Co-op, there was a little Co-op shop, wasn’t there [62 Braintree Road]? (Q: Yes). Well, all that land, right down to, to um, Albert Road. Matter of fact some of them houses in Albert, them houses in Albert Road belonged to the Co-op till the people bought them.

Mr Peirce:    Nineteen ten. Now this is my father on the wagon [see picture 6]. Now this (Q: Is it really?) Well I, I worked there for a little while in nineteen twenty six, or sev- yes, in nineteen sev, in nineteen twenty seven. I used to go round there with the horse and cart and I used to work at Bulford mill and all that. You see, well now, that’s the water mill and that’s the power mill, steam mill. (Q: Oh, I see). You see, now, that’s where the Evangelic church is, isn’t it? Now this here, was the allotment belonged to them, er, beehives and all that. Er, That’s where all the flats or something are built down there, ain’t they? [Podsbrook] Maisonettes. Ain’t they? (Q: I think, yes) Where you come ….

Mr Peirce:    Well, that, the other houses that side back on to it. Well, that used to be the cart lodge for Canon Ingles and Canon [i.e. present Church hall] (Q: Was it) And then where the, opposite the Spring Community Centre (Q: Yes) was allotments [now Saxon Drive]. Five shillings a year, my father used to have it. Twenty rod. Well, you paid the five shillings, and a potato. And you had a little bit of supper, all the, um, holders of the allotment. (Q: Oh I see,) You know, I told you (Q: Yes, yes,) where the footpath went through that allotment, and you went and paid it, Mr Hodges was the man, that took the money . He lived right, the other side of the railway line, near the Witham Creamery is, but a bomb dropped on it during the War, didn’t it? Blew it all to pieces. But they’ve rebuilt a new house, didn’t they [probably 20 Highfields Road]. Well, that was the man who used to take the money.

 

Mrs Hicks

Tape 99

Q: What did you used to make them with?

Mrs H: Great big stone bottles with a handle on the side. We used to make rhubarb but I don’t like that, and dandelion. Ooh that was lovely. Better than any whisky if you keep it a year. I made some of that once and blackberry, damson, all sorts I used to make. I don’t like, that used to be rhubarb, really, because they grew that on the allotment, and you see that didn’t cost anything. Only just the sugar, well the sugar wasn’t only about sixpence a pound then. You could do what you liked.
Ted Mott

Tape 103

Mr M: I used to have a piece of an allotment down Maldon Road when they had allotments down there, from up here. Because it was a family piece of allotment. A good piece you see. I used to trundle off down there with Keith on the front on a Saturday morning, stay down there till dinner time and come home. Just have an early breakfast and go down. He used to do a Sunday paper round, go up the shop here. I used to help him down as far as where the allotments were and then do the allotment. He used to come back up there.
Walter Peirce

Tape 110

Well, I used to go to the matinee, Saturday afternoon, three ha’pence. And this was after the war, after the First War, of course. And there was a lot of horses about then, see. And there was a big goods yard then, ain’t got that now, used to be a big goods yard wound by Cooper Tabers, seed merchants. Well, my father had this allotment and he said he’d give me a ha’penny for a barrow-load of horse manure. Well, we used to have Tate & Lyle sugar boxes, that’s what they were then. Used to get them at the grocer’s on a pair of perambulator wheels. With two handles on the side, that was [???]. Then we used to go along the road with a shovel and brush and fill it up. Well, I know I used to take it up the allotment and push it on a heap. So Father used to say ‘‘How many loads you took today, boy?’ ‘Oh, three of them’. ‘Three?’ ‘Yes, three’. That was three ha’pence. I could go to the pictures couldn’t I?

Tape 125

And then you come round the bend and that is Cressing Road. Well, all that field belonged to John Brown. So the Witham Council bought it, didn’t they? And they bought all that field and then they bought this field here, what’s called Homefield. That was my allotment. I had two bits of allotment there. That was our allotment, you see and that’s called Homefield. Well, all that used to belong to John Brown and the Council bought it all.
Mr Ken Miller

Tape 187

Well Henry’s father was a great poacher, well not poacher, but rabbiter and lived by the gun sort of thing, and there was a hare that used to elude him in the garden fields, of course the allotment holders wanted it caught because of the damage it was doing. And down opposite Spring Lodge, there was a five bar wooden gate, I can see it now, and, into the allotments, and this gate was always open for people coming and going on their bikes and trolleys and what have you. And this hare always got away across the road, cause it was, it was all fields across the road then, and the hare’d get away. So one day he shut the gate, and the hare ran full belt into the gate, and he got it, killed it. And Henry always used to spin this tale, and how his father got that, cause he was a great big tall bloke, and as I can remember he used to call on his bike, and, he was a bricklayer for Crittall’s, and I used to sharpen his chisels for him.

 

 

 

Mr John Newman

Tape 191

[re Station Maltings]

For some reason that little bit of ground was always known as Canada (Questioner: Known as what?) Canada. Yes, that piece of ground just there was always known as Canada. There were some allotments there as well. ‘Oh’, he says, ‘I’ve got an allotment on Canada’, so you knew where his allotment was.

 

 

 

http://www.inbrief.co.uk/neighbour-disputes/allotments.htm

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/10774314/Allotments-being-sold-off-for-development-despite-government-pledges.html

 

 

Email from Richard Pilbrow

richardpilbrow+allot-sec

 

Dear Janet,

 

It has been suggested that you may be able to help us in our research concerning how and when the Cut Throat Lane Allotment site was set up, by whom, and whether or not it directly replaced much older allotments on the other side of the main railway line which we believe were statutory allotments.

 

If you are willing and able to assist us it will be very much appreciated.  Our enquiry arises because Braintree District Council in their efforts to drive down operating costs are encouraging us to self-manage the Cut Throat Lane allotments on a long lease.  That is fine in principle, but they state that the site is currently classified as “temporary allotments” and they intend to refer to the allotments in the lease as “Community Land”.  They include a clause that allows them to take back the land after giving us 12 months notice, and excludes any obligation on the Council’s part to seek to find us an alternative site should they do so.  We believe that the Cut Throat Lane allotments, by their historical associations, are statutory allotments and should be referred to in the lease as “allotment gardens” and not as “community Land”.  Should we be able to prove that the allotments are “statutory” not “temporary”, whilst the Council can still take back the land by giving 12 months notice, it becomes under an obligation to try to find a suitable alternative land for use as allotments (which is commonly now achieved via section 106 planning agreements when new housing estates are developed).

 

We are very wary of entering into the contract as proposed since we believe that if we should do so, the land could quite easily be appropriated for any alternative use that the Council can demonstrate serves a “community purpose”, and deplete even further the land that has been lost to development in the Witham area.

 

Certainly the Cut Throat Lane site replaced others in Witham, including the old site on the opposite side of the railway which was almost certainly statutory allotment land.  We do know that what is now Cut Throat Lane Allotments was previously a seed trials ground occupied by Thomas Cullen & Sons.  Cullens closed their Witham operation (after mergers or takeovers) in 1983.  However it appears that allotment gardens use of the land that is now Cut Throat Lane allotments commenced before that year as Ordnance Survey maps show the area as “allotment gardens” in 1978 (but it was still seemingly Cullens seed trial fields in 1971).

 

 

We would like to be able to read Council Minutes dating back to the time the old allotments on the opposite side of the railway were taken back by the Council to be developed for industrial/commercial use (what is now part of Eastways Industrial Estate).  This may have been under Witham Council control, or under Braintree District Council (following the Local Government Act 1972 when Town Council land holdings transferred to District Councils).  We also would like to be able to read contemporary Council Minutes from the time the Cut Throat Lane site was appropriated for allotment use.  It appears to have been part of a development deal for the whole portion of former agricultural land that now forms the housing estate bordered by Conrad Road, Forest Road, Cut Throat Lane and the Branch railway line from Witham to Braintree.

 

If you do feel you can help us with some dates to narrow down our search through Council Minutes it will be so much appreciated.  If there is evidence in your possession that we could photograph or photocopy that would be even better.

 

We have not met but I am more than happy to come and meet you if discussion would be the best way forward.

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard Pilbrow

 

Secretary, Witham Allotment and Leisure Gardeners Association.

 

Copy addressees are our Chairman, Richard Playle, and Treasurer, David Youngman

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dorothy Sayers’ Cottages, 22-26 Newland Street (Cocksmiths), and Mike Wadhams

 

The obituary and the article which are shown below appeared in Essex Archaeology and History News, number 111, in April 1991.

The three cottages were said in the 18th century to be “three tenements previously one”. They are known to have 15th-century timbers surviving. The grey-brick frontages were added in the 19th century – the three are all different.

Number 22 was known as Chantry Cottage.

Dorothy L Sayers was the well-known author who lived at number 24 (Sunnyside) from the early 1930s until her death in 1957. She also had a flat in London.

Cocksmiths was the old name of number 26, going back to at least the 1600s. At the time written about below, it was being used to describe the whole group of three.

Mike Wadhams was a gifted historian of timber-framed buildings who had recently died. He had helped to lead the Witham Archaeological Research Group, and went on to join the County Council’s Historic Building Section. He, and his colleagues there, had worked successfully to ensure that numbers 22-26 Newland Street were preserved, in spite of many difficulties.

The short first item below is an obituary of Mike by Paul Gilman. The second, longer, item, was written by myself in 1991. It is an account of my conversations with him about the cottages.


The front cover of the newsletter, with a drawing by Mike Wadhams of the frontage of 22-26 Newland Street.
____________________________

 

 

Above: an obituary of Mike Wadhams by Paul Gilman, newsletter editor

_____________________________________

 

 

 

 

Below: an article by Janet Gyford written in 1991, about Mike Wadhams and Dorothy Sayers Cottages, 22-26 Newland Street (Cocksmiths)

A cross section of numbers 22-26 drawn by Mike Wadhams

 

 

 

 

See also the following in the Essex Record Office:
T/P 198/3      Survey of Cocksmiths, 22-26 Newland St., Witham (15th-18th centuries with 18th and 19th century alterations)
Incl. plans, sections and elevations, photographs of garden houses, of roof structure and other interior details, drawings of Victorian internal fitments and summary of deeds 1876-1965.
T/P 198/12  Ditto.

The Spa at Witham

The Spa at Witham
Miscellaneous information


An account of the Spa from pages 37-38 of
A History of Witham by Janet Gyford

For a time a Spa helped to enhance Witham’s reputation for gentility. The spring was in a field north of Powershall End. A recent dowsing survey indicated that the remains of two large structures are hidden underground there (existing houses with ‘Spa’ names are all later).

There had been an unsuccessful attempt to tap the waters in about 1700, and then in November 1735 the business was properly established by a written agreement between four partners. They were Sir Edward and Lady Jane Southcott, Dr James Taverner, and Martin Carter. Sir Edward owned the field, which was part of his Witham Place estate. Dr Taverner, a Catholic like the Southcotts, was the medical man. And Mr Carter was a very rich gentleman and lawyer seeking a good investment. A few years later he had a six-year old ‘negro’ boy ‘belonging’ to him at his home (now Avenue House). The lad fell ill, was baptised with the name Scipio Africanus, and died shortly afterwards.

The agreement refers to the ‘profits and advantages’ to be gained from selling the water, admitting people to the field, and renting out shops and stalls. Expenses included ‘wages to servants or dippers’, and the purchase of bottles and flasks.

Tickets could be obtained at inns in the town, or at the ‘Little Room’ next to the ‘Pump’. The centre-piece was the Assembly Room, or ‘Long Room’, probably constructed from the remains of the great Hall at New Hall near Boreham.

Dr Taverner published a booklet in 1737, stressing that the water was ‘of so exceeding volatile a nature’ that it could not be transported, however well corked. So invalids needed to ‘come to the Spring, and take it upon the Spot’. He also mentioned the ‘serene wholesome air’.

I have not found any comments from people who took the Witham waters. But the Sussex man mentioned later as finding Witham ‘handsome’ wrote that the town was ‘universally known on account of the spa, which has two very agreeable walks about it’.

Advertisements in the newly founded Ipswich Journal tell us about its medical successes and its social life. Visiting patrons could be fetched from their lodgings. During the summer season there were regular gatherings where people could mingle or play cards. The highlights were monthly Assemblies, with a Ball, held in the Long Room.

‘Coffee and refreshments’ were served at Barnardiston House in Chipping Hill by Jacob Pattisson. In due course he obtained a quarter share in ‘the waters’, and probably continued to run the Spa after all four of the original partners died (the first being Dr Taverner in December 1747).

The advertisements ceased when Jacob also died in 1754, but a house to let in Terling in 1756 was promoted as being ‘about two miles from Witham Spa’, showing that the image was still valuable.

Above: Features of the Spa, on a modern base map.

Below: Possible traces of the Spa buildings in a dowsing survey


Spa events from Ipswich Journal

Year Dates Monthly Assemblies in Long Room at Spa Other events
1742 24 June, 22 July, 26 August, 4 October Assembly and Ball. At the ‘Long Room at Witham Spa. Tickets from White Hart or Red Lion in advance, or from ‘Little Room next the pump’ on day of assembly
1743 23 June, 22 July, 26 August, 4 October Assembly. Now on subscription so ‘certainty of meeting good company. Signify inclination at Spa, White Hart, or Red Lion. Conveyance from town. Weekly assemblies continue as formerly
1744 3 June, 16 July, 13 August, ?Sept, 8 October Assembly. Proper conveyance for those who lodge at a distance.

Subscription to exclude improper but genteel OK even though not sub (30 June)

Card assemblies twice a week as usual
1745 3 June, 5 August, 2 Sept, 30 Sept Assembly. ‘At the Long Room by the Spa’ Card assemblies every week as formerly (June), twice a week as usual (August, Sept)
1746 23 June, 21 July, 18 August, 15 Sept Assembly. Long Room at the Spa. With a Ball.
1747 8 June, 6 July, 10 Aug, 7 Sept Assembly and Ball. Genteel appearance admitted though not sub
1748 27 June, 25 July, 29 Aug, 26 Sept Assembly. By subscription at Long Room by the Spa. OK if Genteel appearance though not sub
1749 15 June, 13 July, 17 Aug, 14 Sept, 12 Oct (last if desired) Assembly. By sub at the long room by the spa. OK if genteel though not sub
1750 7 June, 5 July, 9 Aug, 6 Sept, 5 Oct (last if desired) Assembly and Ball. By sub at the long room by the spa. OK if genteel though not sub. September assembly ‘to be preceded by a concert of music’.
1751 27 June, 29 July (altered to 25?), 22 Aug, 26 Sept 25 Oct (altered to 24?) Assembly. By sub at the long room by the spa. OK if genteel though not sub

For July, tickets to be had at the White Hart or the Spa Room.

1752 18 June, 16 July, 13 Aug, 21 Sept, 19 Oct (last if desired) Assembly. Admitted of genteel appearance if introduced by subscriber
1753 Not mentioned
1754 4 July
(1756) (12 June, ad for house to be let in Terling says ‘about two Miles from Witham Spa’)

 

 


 

First World War. 15. Witham soldiers killed, together with information about the progress of the War

Witham in the First World War.
15. Witham soldiers who died in WW1, in date order, together with information about the progress of the War.

Compiled by Janet Gyford, c.2005

For a list of other chapters about WW1, click here.

General information is mostly from the schoolnet web site and from http://www.firstworldwar.com/onthisday

Details are mostly from the War memorial and the web site of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC).

(Y) after names show people who almost certainly had their homes in Witham.
(P) shows people who perhaps had their names in Witham.
(N) shows people not living in Witham (but perhaps sons of Witham people etc.).

Black is Western front, blue at sea, brown Middle East, orange Italy, Greece and Turkey

Information about individuals is arranged like this:-

Date of death / Name / Rank / Honours / Regiment and unit /  Age / Additional info. from CWGC et al / Grave ref CWGC / Cemetery CWGC / Cemetery loc CWGC

I have only put the strokes (/) in the entries for the first two soldiers, because of lack of time. I hope the other entries will make reasonable sense all the same. Note that two double dashes [–    –] usually means that there is no information about the soldier’s age or relatives.

_____________________________

4 August 1914.  GB & F declare War on Germany.
7 to 16 August 1914.  First contingent of British Expeditionary Force lands in France.
21 August 1914.  British move towards Mons; 23rd the battle of Mons begins.
24-26 August 1914.  Retreat from Mons.
26 August 1914. Rearguard action at Battle of Le Cateau: British forced to retreat: Louvain destroyed by the Germans.

26 August 1914.  Lieut Auriol Round injured at le Cateau.
05 September 1914  /  Death of Auriol Francis Hay Round (Y)  /  Lieutenant  /  Essex Regiment, 2nd Bn.  /  22  /  Son of Francis R. Round, C.M.G., and F. Emily Round, of Avenue House, Witham  /  North boundary.  /  Witham (All Saints) Churchyard  /  United Kingdom, Essex
Essex County Chronicle 11 Sept says Auriol’s injury was on 26 Aug at Le Cateau.  Says he was taken back to London Hospital, got tetanus, died 5th Sept. Long report of him and funeral. First Essex army officer to be killed in the War.

-10 September 1914Marne
13-28 September, 1914. Aisne. Heavy fighting round Missy and Vailly.

14 September 1914  / Death of Richard Howard-Vyse, Chev. Legion d’Honneur Loyal N (Y)  /  Captain  /  Chev. Legion d’Honneur Loyal N  /  Lancashire Regiment, Adjt. 1st Bn.  /  37  /  Son of the late Lt. Gen. E. Howard-Vyse, of Witham, Essex.  /  — /   La Ferte-Sous-Jouarre Memorial

France, Seine-et-Marne
Aisne, bombardment of Reims Cathedral.

20 September 1914    Alexander Wighton Ingles (N)    Major    West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales’s Own), 1st Bn.    45    Son of the Rev. Canon D. Ingles, of Witham, Essex; husband of Eugenie Ellen Ingles, of Heatherhurst, Camberley, Surrey. Served in the South African Campaign.       La Ferte-Sous-Jouarre Memorial, France, Seine-et-Marne
[referred to in  EWN and ECC 1 Oct 1915 when Canon Ingles retired. Said he had been surrounded, but not surrendered]

15 October-22 November 1914, Ypres (1st B), British Expeditionary Force ‘effectively destroyed as professional army’.

Pacific: Battle of Coronel: H.M.S.s “Monmouth” and “Good Hope” lost in fight with von Spee’s German squadron.

01 November 1914    Ernest George Glass (Y)    Stoker 1st class    Royal Navy, HMS Good Hope    32    Son of John and Alice Jane Glass, of 4, Scrivener Terrace, Chipping Hill, Witham, Essex.      4. Portsmouth Naval Memorial    United Kingdom, Hampshire

1 Jan – 30 March 1915, Allied offensive in Artois and Champagne

01 January 1915    William Everitt (N)    Private    Scots Guards, 2nd Bn.   32    Husband of Annie L. M. Everitt, of 34, Gideon Rd., Lavender Hill, London.     Panel 1, Ploegsteert Memorial    Belgium, Comines-Warneton, Hainaut
Not on War memorial but buried in All Saints churchyard, Witham.

03 March 1915    Henry William Warr (N)   Private    Essex Regiment, 6th Bn.    48    Son of Charles Wesley Warr; husband of Elizabeth Warr, of 59, Park Rd., West Ham, London. Born at Stratford.      North-west of church    Witham (All Saints)    United Kingdom, Essex

Early March 1915, Neuve Chapelle

17 April 1915    J O’Connell (N)    Private    Royal Warwickshire Regiment, 7th Bn.    —    —   North-east corner, Witham (All Saints) churchyard    United Kingdom, Essex.   One of the soldiers billeted in Witham. [see newspaper] Not on War memorial.

22 April-May 25 1915. Ypres (2nd) Germans, poison gas
9 May 1915, Artois (2nd) began
13 May 1915. Beginning of Battle of Frezenberg. Battle of Frezenberg notorious for Essex men according to Ian Hook. ‘Famous charge’ by Essex Yeomanry.

Harry Mann of Witham wounded (according to later Essex Weekly News, 1 October 1915, when he was at home and had drawn pictures etc for an address to Canon Ingles, vicar, who was leaving).

8th – 13th May ‘Battle of Frezenberg Ridge During this phase of the battle of Ypres the Germans tried to smash through the front held by the 27th and 28th divisions by using their superiority in guns and ammunition. The front line trenches were obliterated, but despite this and the release of a further gas cloud on the 10th May they made little headway. By the end of the six day battle the Germans had advanced about a thousand yards’ (from http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~cjmorton/service/ww1/ypres/overview.htm)

March 1915 –January, 1916. Gallipoli

07 May 1915    James Everitt (Y)      Private    Essex Regiment, 1st Bn.    32    Son of Mrs. Elizabeth Ann Everitt, of 67, Maldon Rd., Witham, Essex.      Panel 144 to 150 or 229 to 233, Helles Memorial    Turkey, unspecified

Gallipoli, two divisions effect surprise landing at Suvla Bay and attack

06 August 1915    F O Joslin (N)    Private    Essex Regiment, 1st Bn.    21    Son of Mrs. J. Everitt, of Rose Cottage, Great Baddow, Chelmsford.    Of Boreham, Essex.      Sp. Mem. C. 313, Twelve Tree Copse Cemetery     Turkey, unspecified

06 August 1915    H T Payne (P)    Second Lieut       Essex Regiment, 3rd Bn. attd. 1st Bn.    —    —    VII. D. 1, Twelve Tree Copse Cemetery    Turkey, unspecified

25 September – 13 Oct 1915. Artois-Loos

04 October 1915    G C Dawson (Y)    Private       Essex Regiment, 11th Bn.    21    Son of Mrs. S. Dawson, of Church St., Chipping Hill, Witham, Essex.      I. E. 12,. Chocques Military Cemetery   France, Pas de Calais
Essex County Chronicle, 15 and 22 Oct 1915, just says ‘in action at the Dardanelles’. Memorial service etc. All his 4 brothers serving

09 October 1915    Hubert Noel Pelly [or Hubert Richard in ECC] (Y)    Lieutenant    Essex Regiment, 1st/7th Bn.    20    Son of Edmund Nevill Pelly and E. Mary Pelly, of Witham Lodge, Witham, Essex.       IV. B. 2, 7th FIELD AMBULANCE CEMETERY   Turkey, unspecified

18 October 1915    Edward Ernest Shelley (P)   Private    Essex Regiment, 9th Bn.    —    —     Panel 85 to 87, Loos Memorial    France, Pas de Calais

23 October 1915    Charles Leonard Sneezum
(Y)   Private     Essex Regiment, 11th Bn.    22    Son of Arthur William and Alice Sneezum, of High St., Witham.      North-West of Church, Witham (All Saints) Churchyard     United Kingdom, Essex
Died in England from wounds received at Loos, and buried in Witham – see Essex County Chronicle and Essex Weekly News 5 Nov 1915, and photos M922-927

2 Feb 1916, British introduced conscription
Verdun (the French)

20 March 1916    Frank Edward Haygreen (Y)   Driver    Royal Engineers, 70th Field Coy.    25    Son of Emma Jane Haygreen, of 7, Trafalgar Square, Maldon Rd., Witham, Essex.      IV. E. 49, Lillers Communal Cemetery     France, Pas de Calais

18 May 1916    R C Brown (Y)    Private    Essex Regiment, 11th Bn.    37    Husband of Mrs. A. Brown, of Church St., Chipping Hill, Witham, Essex.      I. M. 23. Wimereux Communal Cemetery   France, Pas de Calais

18 May 1916    George William Sneezum (Y)   Private      Essex Regiment, 11th Bn.    24    Son of Arthur William and Alice Sneezum, of 151, High St., Witham, Essex.      II. N. 21, Essex Farm Cemetery   Belgium, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen.  See Essex County Chronicle, 26 May 1916, shot by bullet, buried Essex Farm.

1 July to c. 18 November, 1916.  Somme (1st day, 1 July, worst in history of army, 1/3 killed. Offensive starts north and south of Somme.

01 July 1916    Bert Allen (Y)    Lance Corp    Essex Regiment, 2nd Bn.    25    Son of Alfred and Agnes Allen, of 21, Mill Field Terrace, Witham, Essex.   Pier and Face 10 D, Thiepval Memorial    France,

Somme, British advance continued

15 July 1916    George William Fleming (Y)   Private    Suffolk Regiment, 4th Bn.    16    Son of Mr. A. and Mrs E. Fleming, of 19, Church St., Chipping Hill, Witham, Essex [probably Arthur and Ellen, from 1930 electoral register]      XI. C. 10,   Flatiron Copse Cemetery, Mametz     France, [checked age 16 with cwgc, they said yes]

Somme. British storm and capture German second line positions.

17 July 1916    Alfred Potter (Y)    Private    Royal Munster Fusiliers, 2nd Bn.    25    Son of Mrs. E. Potter, of 28, Maldon Rd., Witham, Essex.    Pier and Face 16 C,  Thiepval Memorial    France.

13 August 1916    Clifford G. Shelley (P)    Private      Essex Regiment, 9th Bn.    —    —    Pier and Face 10 D, Thiepval Memorial    France

France, Somme, near Courcelette the British front advanced

16 September 1916    F S Newman (N)    Private     Royal Army Service Corps, 9th Field Amb.    22   Son of Frederick and Rose Newman, of Sandon, Essex.   II. E. 50, La Neuville British Cemetery    Corbie

Somme, British storm Stuff Redoubt and advance

27 September 1916    Albert Clarence Prentice (Y)   Lance Corp    Essex Regiment, 11th Bn.    22    Son of Mrs. Emma J. Prentice, of 33, Powers Hall End, Witham, Essex.      Pier and Face 10 D, Thiepval Memorial    France

Somme, Thiepval ridge (except part of Schwaben Redoubt) all occupied. Advance south of Eaucourt l’Abbaye.

30 September 1916    Walter Henry Howell (Y)   Private   London Regiment, 1st/9th Bn. (Rifleman, Queen Victoria’s Rifles)    20    Son of Charles William and Agnes Howell, of Witham, Essex.       XI. D. 6, Etaples Military Cemetery    France, Pas de Calais

06 October 1916    Edwin Graham-Brown (P)
[or just E G Brown]    Private    Queen’s Own (Royal West Kent) Regiment, 11th Bn.    —    —   Pier and Face 11 C, Thiepval Memorial    France, Somme

Somme, front, north: … Germans regain ground.

06 November 1916    F T W Hammond (Y)    Lance Corp      Essex Regiment, 9th Bn.    21    Son of George and Elizabeth Hammond, of Bridge St., Witham, Essex.       VIII. H. 6, Habarcq Communal Cemetery Extension     France, Pas de Calais

Somme, battle of the Ancre: British capture [several places] … and nearly 4,000 prisoners.

13 November 1916    James Murray Round, M.C. (Y)    Captain    MC    Essex Regiment, 13th Bn.   22   Son of the late Francis R. Round, C.M.G., and of Frances Emily Round, of Avenue House, Witham, Essex.      I. K. 37, Serre Road Cemetery No. 2   France, Somme
Probably something in newspapers about him

28 November 1916    A E Baker (P)    Private       Essex Regiment, 9th Bn.    —    —
II. B. 13, Wanquetin Communal Cemetery     France, Pas de Calais

South of the Ancre British penetrate … into enemy positions … North of the Ancre British take hostile trenches

 17 February 1917    A A Phillips (P)    Private        Northamptonshire Regiment, 6th Bn.    —    —    IV. D. 8, Regina Trench Cemetery, Grandcourt    France, Somme

Germans begin to withdraw in front of Serre.

21 February 1917    Maurice J Bones (P)    Private       Essex Regiment, 13th Bn.    —    —    Pier and Face 10 D, Thiepval Memorial     France, Somme

March – April 1917, Gaza

Gaza, First Battle of Gaza. General Murray attacks; thick fog; Gaza surrounded, but not penetrated

26 March 1917    Alfred James Seaborn (Y)   Private  Essex Regiment, 5th Bn.    21    Son of Charles and Emily Seaborn, of Ardley’s Yard, High St., Witham, Essex.    Panels 33 to 39,  Jerusalem Memorial   Israel, unspecified

26 March 1917    P F Adams (P)    Private        Essex Regiment, 1st/5th Bn.    —    —    X. C. 7, Gaza War Cemetery     Israel, unspecified

6 April 1917, US declares war on Germany
8 April – end May, 1917, Arras
British advance … Severe fighting …

07 April 1917    C. Driver (Y)    Corporal    M.M.    Gloucestershire Regiment, 2nd/5th Bn.    30    Son of Mrs. A. Driver, of Mill Lane, Witham, Essex. [he was a singer, see Essex County Chronicle, 17 January 1917, when he was on sick leave]    I. C. 42,    Vadencourt British Cemetery, Maissemy     France, Aisne

07 April 1917    J C Bright (P)    Lance Corp       Suffolk Regiment, 11th Bn.    —    —    I. K. 49,    Aubigny Communal Cemetery Extension     France, Pas de Calais

Arras, British capture [several places] German attack on British … repulsed.

14 April 1917    William Ernest Duncombe (Y)   Private    Essex Regiment, 1st Bn.    20    Son of Mr. and Mrs. W. Duncombe, of Water Works, Witham, Essex.      Bay 7, Arras Memorial     France, Pas de Calais

Gaza, Second Battle of Gaza. Heavy fighting and much ground gained, but, owing to severe losses, attack not pushed through.

19 April 1917    Frederick William Cornwell (Y)   Private    Hampshire Regiment, 1st/8th Bn.    27   Son of Sarah Cornwell, of 3, Scrivener Terrace, Chipping Hill, Witham, Essex, and the late Frederick Cornwell.      Panels 28 and 29,    Jerusalem Memorial      Israel, unspecified

Arras, British gain ground east of Fampoux (east of Arras).

21 April 1917    Sidney Arthur Hutley (Y)   Corporal     Queen’s Own (Royal West Kent), Regiment, 6th Bn.    20    Son of Mrs. M. A. Hutley and the late James Hutley, of Hope Cottage, Mill Lane, Witham, Essex.      1, Hesdin Communal Cemetery      France, Pas de Calais

Arras, South of Moronvilliers two heavy enemy counter-attacks fail.

01 May 1917    Robert Steele Stoneham (P)    Lance Corp    Essex Regiment, 2nd Bn.    —    —    Bay 7, Arras Memorial      France, Pas de Calais

Arras, Repulse of various German attacks on ground gained by Allies

11 May 1917    F Perry (P)    Private    Essex Regiment, 9th Bn.    —    —    XXV. A. 9A, Etaples Military Cemetery     France, Pas de Calais

Arras, British storm most of Bullecourt, and Roeux trenches. Enemy’s counter-attack fails.

12 May 1917    Frederick William Thorogood (N)   Private    Queen’s Own (Royal West Kent) Regiment, 6th Bn.    27    Husband of Jane Elizabeth Thorogood, of 131, Arlington Rd., Camden Town, London.      Bay 7, Arras Memorial     France, Pas de Calais

21 May – 14 June, 1917. Messines

25 June 1917, US troops arrive in France

July – late Sept 1917, Passchendaele, including Ypres (3rd)

20 July 1917    Stephen Wilfred Tyrell (N)    Private   Middlesex Regiment, 23rd Bn.    32    Son of Clara Tyrell, of Chipping Hill, Witham, Essex, and the late Peter Tyrell; husband of Beatrice Emma Tyrell, of Brook Villa, White Notley, Witham, Essex.      Sp. Mem. H. 1, Hedge Row Trench Cemetery     Belgium, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen
Essex Weekly News 25 January 1918, page 6, re funeral of Stephen’s father Peter, says ‘Mr and Mrs Tyrell recently lost second son in France. The eldest is at present in Salonika’.

Gaza, successful British raid

22 July 1917    Herbert Hooten (P)    Private       Dorsetshire Regiment, 2nd Bn.    23    Son of Mrs. Lily Pettitt.      Panel 22 and 63,  Basra Memorial   Iraq, unspecified

Passchendaele Intense artillery activity in Flanders.

22 July 1917    B Bickmore (Y)    Corporal      Royal Field Artillery, “C” Bty. 83rd Bde.    35    Husband of Sarah Ann Bickmore, of 51, Maldon Rd., Witham, Essex.      I. L. 8, Perth Cemetery (China Wall) Belgium, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen,

Passchendaele, successful British raids [does it mean air ?]

28 July 1917    Frank James Goodey (N)    Gunner      Royal Garrison Artillery, 163rd Siege Bty.    36    Son of James and Mary Goodey, of Witham, Essex [James probably UDC water engineer]; husband of Louisa Goodey, of 9, Grosvenor Rd. East, St. Albans.      III. A. 3, Mendinghem Military Cemetery     Belgium, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen

Ypres, 3rd battle of Ypres begins. British and French attack on 15-mile front in Flanders

31 July 1917    Charles Blade Wenden (Y)    Second Lieut   Royal Garrison Artillery, 104th Siege Bty.   28    Husband of Jessie M. Wenden, of Witham, Essex.      I. I. 14, Belgian Battery Corner Cemetery   Belgium, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen

Ypres, Positions ….retaken by British. Germans attack … and carry some trenches.

02 August 1917    Henry Everitt (P)    Corporal       Queen’s Own (Royal West Kent) Regiment, 6th Bn.    —    —    Bay 7, Arras Memorial     France, Pas de Calais

Ypres, Allies attack on nine-mile front … capturing all objectives … Germans press back British from ground won earlier in the day.

16 August 1917    Henry Charles Godfrey (Y)   Private    Essex Regiment, 1st Bn.    19    Son of Henry and Florence Godfrey, of 27, Bridge St., Witham, Essex.      Panel 98 to 99, Tyne Cot Memorial      Belgium, Zonnebeke, West-Vlaanderen

Ypres, north of Ypres slight British advance.

20 August 1917    Cyril Chaplin (Y)    Corporal       East Surrey Regiment, 9th Bn.    24    Son of Henry James and Caroline Chaplin, of Bridge St., Witham.   In North-West part, Witham (All Saints) churchyard      United Kingdom, Essex
[died in England: see M photos:-]

Ypres … British line slightly advanced.

23 August 1917    G. Pavelin (P)    Private    Kings Royal Rifle Corps, 9th Bn.    —    —    XVIII. B. 3A,    Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery      Belgium, Poperinge, West-Vlaanderen

Ypres, British advanced line forced back from positions gained on 22 August.

24 August 1917    Harold Cecil Round (Y)    Captain   D.S.O., M.C.    Rifle Brigade, 6th Bn. attd. 9th Bn.   21    Son of Frances Emily Round, of Avenue House, Witham, Essex, and the late Francis Richard Round, C.M.G.       Panel 145 to 147, Tyne Cot Memorial   Belgium, Zonnebeke, West-Vlaanderen
See Essex County Chronicle, 14 Sept 1917. There was a memorial service, jointly with Capt R L Hardy (for whom see below. This was the Rounds’ third son to be killed; a fourth, Pt A J M Round of the Canadian Forces, was at the memorial service]

24 August 1917    Richard Luard Hardy (N)   Captain    Kings Royal Rifle Corps, 8th Bn.    26   Son of the late Richard Gillies Hardy, C.S.I., and of Charlotte Amfie [sic] Hardy, of The Hurst, Church Crookham, Hants [Charlotte = 1st daughter of Admiral Luard]      Sp. Mem. A. 3, Hooge Crater Cemetery      Belgium, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen
Essex County Chronicle, 14 Sept 1917 reported a memorial service, jointly with Capt H Round (for whom see above)

Ypres, Enemy’s attacks on Tower Hamlets’ ridge (Ypres) repulsed.

21 September 1917    Harry W Collar (P)    Private      Durham Light Infantry, 20th Bn.    26    Son of the late William and Eliza Collar, of Gestingthorpe, Essex.      Panel 128 to 131 and 162 and 162A, Tyne Cot Memorial      Belgium, Zonnebeke, West-Vlaanderen

19 October 1917    Ernest William Horsnell (P)   Private   Northumberland Fusiliers, 22nd (Tyneside Scottish) Bn.    —    —    Panel 19 to 23 and 162,   Tyne Cot Memorial      Belgium, Zonnebeke, West-Vlaanderen

Ypres, Germans regain a little ground … German attack(s) … repulsed.

23 October 1917    G William Jopson (Y)    Private       Essex Regiment, “C” Coy. 10th Bn.    25    Son of David and Mary Jane Jopson, of 68, Church St., Chipping Hill, Witham, Essex.      Panel 98 to 99,    Tyne Cot Memorial      Belgium, Zonnebeke, West-Vlaanderen

Ypres, German attack in Champagne repulsed.

28 October 1917    Louis Bradshaw (P)    Gunner       Royal Garrison Artillery, 171st Siege Bty.    —    —   I. I. 39, Ypres Reservoir Cemetery      Belgium, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen

Middle East, British capture positions north of Beersheba. On Tigris, British rout Turks near Dur, 85 miles above Baghdad.

02 November 1917    G W Webb (P)    Private       Essex Regiment, 1st/5th Bn.    —    —      XXVI. F. 1, Gaza War Cemetery      Israel, unspecified

20 November – 7 Dec 1917, Cambrai
Cambrai, Surprise British Advance Third Army … attacks on ten mile front … “Hindenburg Line” broken, numerous villages captured …

20 November 1917    Henry William Perry Porter (N)    Lance Corp    Royal Engineers, 1st Bn [newspaper says Northumberland Fusiliers]    32   Son of James and Oliva Porter, of High St., Witham, husband of Kathleen Matilda Porter, of Terling, Chelmsford [Riverhill Terling acc to newspaper].   Bay 2-3, Arras Memorial      France, Pas de Calais. Mentioned in Essex Weekly News, 4 Jan 1918 p 5, and 11 Jan p 1, 25 Jan p 5 col 6 (‘Mrs Porter of Terling. Husband Lance Corporal Henry W P Porter in Northumberland Fusiliers, reported killed last year. Letter from officer. 32 years. Front for 11 months. Only son of Mr and Mrs J Porter of Witham. Assisted father in business of plumber and painter, and in Witham Fire Brigade’).

Cambrai [?],. fierce fighting … British gains …

24 November 1917    Herbert Sidney Valentine (P)   Corporal    Middlesex Regiment, 20th Bn    —    [see photo M1680 and Tribunal in Essex County Chronicle 24 Mch 1916]      Addenda Panel,    Cambrai Memorial, Louverval      France, Nord

03 January 1918    William Charles Bones (Y)   Signalman [Leading Signalman on CWGC]      Royal Navy, H.M. S/M. “G8.”    22    Son of Charles and Mary Elizabeth Bones, of Temperance Hotel, [9 Albert Road] Witham, Essex.    27.    Plymouth Naval Memorial    United Kingdom, Devon

13 January 1918    A H Goody (P)    Private       Northamptonshire Regiment, 6th Bn.    —    —   XV. D. 30, Cement House Cemetery      Belgium, Langemark-Poelkapelle, West-V.
Essex Weekly News, 8 Feb, page 5, col 7 says he ‘died of pneumonia in the Holy Land’.

16 January 1918    Charles John Nelthorpe Aldham (N)    Signaller   London Regiment, 2nd/24th Bn.   31    Son of Alfred B. Aldham, of Witham, Essex [newspaper says of Parkside, Maldon Road]; husband of Emily Bertha Aldham, of 16, York St., Covent Garden, London.      R. 10, Jerusalem War Cemetery     Israel, unspecified

19 February 1918    Harry Chaplin (Y)    Private       London Regiment, 2nd/18th Bn. (London Irish Rifles) [at first was in RAMC]    22    Son of H. J. and Caroline Chaplin, of 38, Bridge St., Witham, Essex.   T.97, Jerusalem War Cemetery     Israel, unspecified
[died in England?].

15 March 1918    Albert Walter Randall (P)   Sergeant    M.S.M.    Army Service Corps, M.T. Coy.   25    Son of Mary Ann Easter (formerly Randall), of 14, Uphavering Terrace, Abbs Cross Rd., Hornchurch, and the late Walter John Randall. Born at Witham.      Near north boundary, Witham (All Saints) Churchyard      United Kingdom, Essex.  Essex Weekly News, 22 March 1918, p 6 col 6. Report of ‘Funeral of Staff sergeant Albert W Randall, MM, ASC (MT), All Saints church.’ Mourners: Mrs Easter, mother; Miss K Randall, sister …and Mr Easter. … Wreath included one from Witham Catechism. At close, Patrol Leader H Bickmore of the Witham scouts sounded the last post.

21 March 1918, Germany launches Spring push, eventually mounting five major offensives against Allied forces, starting with the Battle of Picardy
Germans take … [several places] and reach line of Somme.

 23 March 1918    Harry Sewell (P)    Private    The Queen’s (Royal West Surrey Regiment), 11th Bn.    —    —      Bay 2, Arras Memorial      France, Pas de Calais

Germans held in desperate fighting … cross Somme between … take … [several places]

24 March 1918    Albert A Wright (P)    Private       Middlesex Regiment, 23rd Bn.    —    —      Bay 7,    Arras Memorial      France, Pas de Calais

North of Somme … heavy German attacks break down.
South of Somme  … Demuin lost and retaken by British.

30 March 1918    G H Turner (P)    Corporal    12th Lancers.    —    —      Panel 4, Pozieres Memorial   France, Somme

30 March 1918    Harry William Mann (Y)   Lieutenant    Royal Field Artillery, 178th Bde.    34   Son of the late Mr. and Mrs. F. J. T. Mann, of Witham, Essex; husband of Elsie Muriel Bennett, (formerly Mann), of the Castle House, Ongar, Essex. A.R.I.B.A. Went to France in 1914 as Serjt. in Essex Yeomanry [also see 13 May 1915 above]          I. O. 4, Bellacourt Military Cemetery, Riviere   France, Pas de Calais

9 April 1918, Germany launches second Spring offensive, the Battle of the Lys, in the British sector of Armentieres
Violent attacks on junction of British and French …  south of Somme.

24 April 1918    William John Claydon (Y)    Private   Bedfordshire Regiment, 7th Bn.    18    Son of G. and Annie Claydon, of 14, Bridge St., Witham, Essex.
II. C. 11,  Adelaide Cemetery, Villers-Bretonneux   France, Somme

Minor infantry actions. Enemy guns active …

02 May 1918    Louis George Chaplin (Y)    Private     Cheshire Regiment, 11th Bn.    —    —     V. A. 2,  La Clytte Military Cemetery      Belgium, Heuvelland, West-Vlaanderen. See M photos

27 May 1918, Third German Spring offensive

Third Battle of the Aisne, begins in French sector along Chemin des Dames. New German thrust for Paris. … Allies’ line pressed back …

27 May 1918    Edward Reed (Y)    Sergeant       Essex Regiment, 2nd Bn.(see addit. dets.)    32   Territorial Efficiency Medal. Son of the late William and Ella Mountain Reed, of High St., Witham, Essex. (Main Regt Northamptonshire Regt. Secondary Regt. Essex Regt, formerly “A” Coy. 8th (Cyclist) Bn.    —    Soissons Memorial      France, Aisne

9 June 1918, Germans launch fourth Spring offensive. Battle of the Matz, in French sector between Noyan and Montdider

19 June 1918    John Shelley (Y)    Private    The Queen’s (Royal West Surrey Regiment), 6th Bn.   19    Son of John and Gertrude Shelley, of Witham, Essex.      C. 4, Harponville Communal Cemetery Extension      France, Somme

20 June 1918    H Hammond  (Y)    Private [Lance Corp in CWGC]    Sussex Regiment, 2nd Bn.    —    —      P. 12, Cambrin Military Cemetery      France, Pas de Calais

09 July 1918    Alan Joseph Smith (Y)    Second Lieut    Royal Garrison Artillery, 49th Siege Bty.   19    Son of Joseph Ernest and Florence Mabel Smith, of Earlsmead, Witham, Essex.      Plot 2. Row A. Grave 9, Le Grand Hasard Military Cemetery, Morbecque      France, Nord

15 July 1918, Final phase of great German Spring push. Second Battle of Marne, begins

18 July 1918, Allies counterattack against German forces, seizing initiative

8 August 1918, start of successful Amiens offensive, forcing all German troops back to the Hindenburg Line; Ludendorff calls it a “black day” for German army

 10 August 1918    F Dawson (P)    Private    4th (Queen’s Own) Hussars    —    —      II. I. 4/6,    Fouquescourt British Cemetery      France, Somme

10 August 1918    F Britton (P)    Corporal    Essex Regiment, 9th Bn.    21    Son of George James and Matilda Alice Britton, of Hill Side View, Wickham Bishops, Witham, Essex.      B. 14, Morlancourt British Cemetery No.2      France, Somme

British retake Merville (Lys front).

19 August 1918    Percy Herbert Babbs (Y)   Private    Norfolk Regiment, 12th Bn.    33    Husband of Edith Babbs, of Eagle Cottage, Witham, Essex.      II. C. 64, Outtersteene Communal Cemetery Extension, Bailleul      France, Nord

Battle on 23-mile front; Troops of First Army, supported by tanks, break through Drocourt-Queant “Switch” line, south of Scarpe, capture Cagnicourt and Villers, encircle and take Queant by nightfall; 10,000 prisoners. On Lys front British also gain ground, and north of Peronne, where Sailly-Sallisel and whole of St. Pierre-Vaast Wood re-taken.

02 September 1918    Arthur Ernest Norman [is E A on War Memorial] (N)    Lance Corp [Private on cwgc]    Essex Regiment, 2nd Bn.    29    Husband of E. S. Norman, of Bridge St., Writtle, Chelmsford.   II. K. 25, Dury Crucifix Cemetery      France, Pas de Calais.

Further info from Ian Hook: Originally C Company of the 1st/8th (Cyclist) Battalion
Born and lived Witham, enlisted at Maldon Entitled to the British War and Allied Victory Medals (N.Archive Medal Roll file WO329/1378 as Pte)

In Yugoslavia, Allies continue to advance on both sides of Vardar river.

24 September 1918    Charley [sic] Cole (Y)   Driver    Royal Field Artillery, “B” Bty. 102nd Bde.    27    Son of John and Martha Cole, of Witham, Essex.      Plot 5. Row B. Grave 4, Montecchio Precalcino Communal Cemetery Extension       Italy, unspecified

British take Cambrai. Advance continued. Since 21 August entire Hindenburg system broken through.

09 October 1918     Andrew Ager (P)    Sergeant   [MM in CWGC]    Essex Regiment, 1st Bn.    —    —      Panel 7, Vis-En-Artois Memorial      France, Pas de Calais

07 November 1918    George Ager [Agar in CWGC] (P)    Private    The Queen’s (Royal West Surrey Regiment), 9th Bn.    27    Son of George and Alice Jennings, of Bridge St., Witham.  [?died in England] In North-West part, Witham (All Saints) churchyard      United Kingdom, Essex

07 November 1918    C Bones (P)    Private       Northamptonshire Regiment, 1st Garrison Bn.    —    — [flu epidemic in hospitals?]      411, Kirechkoi-Hortakoi Military Cemetery      Greece, unspecified
Not on War Memorial, but buried All Saints

21 February 1919    Herbert Du Cane Luard (N)   Commander    Coastguard (Plymouth)    49    Son of Admiral Sir William Garnham Luard and Lady Luard, of The Lodge, Witham, Essex; husband of Bessie Luard, of Keith Cottage, Lee-on-the-Solent, Hants.      East of church, Witham (All Saints) churchyard      United Kingdom, Essex


SUMMARY

On War Memorial but details unknown
W E Butcher    Private        Royal Marine? HMS The Queen
A H Benson    Sergeant        Kings Royal Rifle Corps,
C H Everitt    Private        East Surrey Regiment

Numbers killed each year:
1914    4
1915    8 (plus 2 not on war memorial)
1916    14
1917    30
1918    23
(1919    1 not on war memorial)

On War memorial 79. Plus three unknown = 82.
Plus three not on war memorial but buried in All Saints = 85

On the War Memorial, 67, i.e. 79%, were killed from 1916 onwards, 53 (67%) from 1917 onwards.

 

First World War. 14. the Roll of Honour, with all those who were killed.

Witham in the First World War
14. The Roll of Honour, with all those who were killed.
For a list of other chapters about WW1, click here.

The first two pages and the last two are copies of the original. The rest is typed.

 

Witham Roll of Honour, page 1, typed

To the Honour of
The Men of Witham
Who under the Flag of Freedom
fell in the Great War

Pte W J Claydon    Bedf Regt
Pte L G Chaplin    Ches Regt
Pte H W Collar    Durh L I
Pte H Hooten   PW    Dorset Regt
Cpl C Chaplin    E Surr Regt
Pte C H Everitt    E Surr Regt
Pte P F Adams    Essex Regt
Sergt A Agar    Essex Regt
L Cpl B Allen    Essex Regt
Pte A E Baker    Essex Regt
Pte M J Bones    Essex Regt
Cpl F Britton    Essex Regt
Pte R C Brown    Essex Regt
Pte G C Dawson    Essex Regt
Pte W E Duncombe    Essex Regt

Witham Roll of Honour, page 2, typed
Pte J Everitt    Essex Regt
Pte H C Godfrey    Essex Regt
L Cpl. F Hammond    Essex Regt
Pte G W Jopson    Essex Regt
Pte F Joslin    Essex Regt
L Cpl E A Norman    Essex Regt
2nd Lt H T Payne    Essex Regt
Lt H R Pelly    Essex Regt
Pte F Perry    Essex Regt
L Cpl A C Prentice    Essex Regt
Sergt E Reed    Essex Regt
Lt A F H Round    Essex Regt
Capt J M Round, MC    Essex Regt
Pte A J Seabern    Essex Regt
Pte C G Shelley    Essex Regt
Pte E E Shelley    Essex Regt
Pte C L Sneezum    Essex Regt
Pte G W Sneezum    Essex Regt
L Cpl R S Stoneham    Essex Regt
Pte G W Webb    Essex Regt
Cpl C Driver, MM    Glouc Regt

Witham Roll of Honour, page 3, typed
Pte F W Cornwell    Hamps Regt
Pte F Dawson    iv HRS
Sergt A H Benson    K R R F C
Capt R L Hardy    K R R F C
Pte G Pavelin    K R R F C
Sig C J N Aldham    London Regt
Pte H Chaplin    London Regt
Capt R Howard-Vyse
Chev.Legion d’Honneur    Loyal N Lan Regt
Cpl G H Turner    xii LRS
Pte S W Tyrell    Middx Regt
Cpl H S Valentine    Middx Regt
Pte A A Wright    Middx Regt
Pte P H Babbs    Norf  Regt
A H Goody    North N Regt
A A Phillips    North N Regt
E W Horsnell    Northd Fus
Capt H C Round, DSO, MC    Rif Brig
Driver F E Haygreen    R E
L Cpl H W P Porter    R E
Cpl B Bickmore    R F A

Witham Roll of Honour, page 4, typed
Driver C Cole    R F A
Lt H W Mann    R F A
Gnr L Bradshaw    R G A
Gnr F J Goody    R G A
2nd Lt Alan J Smith    R G A
2nd Lt C B Wenden    R G A
Pte A Potter    R Muns Fus
Cpl H Everitt    R W Kent Regt
Pte E Graham-Brown    R W Kent Regt
Cpl S A Hutley    R W Kent Regt
Pte F W Thorogood    R W Kent Regt
Pte G Agar    R W Surr Regt
Pte H Sewell    R W Surr Regt
Pte J Shelley    R W Surr Regt
Sergt A W Randall, MSM    R A S C
Pte F S Newman    R A M C
Pte W Everitt    S Gds
L Cpl J C Bright    Suff Regt
Pte G W Flemming    Suff Regt
Pte H Hammond    Sussex Regt
Maj A W Inglis    W Yorks Regt

Witham Roll of Honour, page 5, typed
Pte W E Butcher, RM    HMS The Queen
Sto 1st Cl  E G Glass    HMS Good Hope

 

 

First World War. 13. the Muster Roll, with all who served and survived

First World War in Witham.
13.
Witham Muster Roll, with those who served and survived.
For a list of other chapters about WW1, click here.

The first three pages and the last one are copies of the original. The rest is typed.

 

 

Witham Muster Roll, page 1, typed
H V Acutt    P Bright
A Appleton    H T Brown
B Appleton    H Brown
S H Alderton    F Brown
G J Alderton    P Brown
C Alderton    Edgar Brown
V F Andrews    S G Brown
C J Aldous    F E Brown
F Aylett    R S Brown
E V Attkinson    F Boobyen
C Algar    E Bickmore
E Algar    A Bickmore
E Adams    N Barber
F Adams    C Barber
P Adams    A Blaber
F R Ardley    J Barrett
A Allen    A E Brewster
J Bright    A Baldwin
A H Bright    H Baxter
G Bright    F Baxter
A Bright    G W Butcher
A Barber   P.W.

Witham Muster Roll, page 2, typed
H Butcher    H Belsham
W Butcher    A Brice
Bernard Blyth    J H Brook
H B Brandt    S Baldwin
W Bull    E W Bright
G Borley    A C Brown
T C Borley    A Beard
E Brand    W J J Burch
A Bott    F Bell
G Bell    J S Bell
P Burton    W E Cornwell
W Bircher    A Cornwell
H Bibby    S E Cook
W Bibby    G Cook
H Barwell
F W Cullen
S R Bradley    L Cullen
A Bradley    E G Cunningham
D Bowyer    J Chamberlain
E V Butler    H Cutts
A R Budge    A Corlick
H F D Corley

Witham Muster Roll, page 3, typed
E Collard    C Dowsett
D Crittall    G Darby
R B Crittall    C Davis
D Chambers    A Driver
C Claydon    T Dodman
A Claydon    A G Drury
A E Claydon    S Drew
C Campney    W Dazley
G B Croxall    P Dorpy
A P Champ    H J Dennis
W Christy    R F G Doole
A G Crayford    C Dorking
E Crabbe    W Dessent
B Coleman    E M Drake
W Cottee    P Dwyer
E Cutmane    V H Duncombe
P C Clomping    H G Duncombe
C Cafer    S Everitt
F T Chilvers    C P Eldred
H L Evitt
P Eckersleigh

Witham Muster Roll, page 4, typed
F Emmens    E Goates
M Ewers    H Green
C H English    F Green
E Frances    A Gray
A Fenner    A E Griggs
D French    A Gosling
D J Frost    E C Gimson
A Fisher    R B Gardner
A B Groves    J H Gardner
J B Groves    E W Grimsey
P Groves    A E Gibbons
L Groves    A Hutley
R Glover    L Hutley
H Godfrey    E Hubbard
P Goody    F Hubbard
H Goody    T Haggar
B Goody    E J Hales
E Goody    P Hambley
F Gaymer    F J Hawkes
R Gaymer    A H Hicks
E Hawkins
W Hoy   P.W.

Witham Muster Roll, page 5, typed
H W Hyde   P.W.    H Lucking
S Haywood    F Lucking
C Horsby    G Lucking
J Hawson    C Lucking
C Hayter    V Larking
J E Hines    A Lazell
E Hawkes    C C A Long
W Haygreen    J Lake
F Haygreen    E Lapwood
V R Halliday    C Lapwood
F Haves    F Lapwood
A G Hammond    A G Love
A Hammond    C Ladkin
A Hooke    J E Lewis
T Johnson    B Mann
W T Johnson    F Mann
C H Jennings    A Manning
J Joy    H de Monte
F W Joslyn    H Mortimer
J W Keeble    M Marshall
H G Keeble    J W Marshall
F Kemp

Witham Muster Roll, page 6, typed
J Matthams    P Pavelin
R S Mott    J Potter
W Mott    G Pryor
D Mead    H Poulter
W Marshall    T Poulter
J Mawdsley    F R Parker
A K Motion    D O Peddock
F Mayes    C A Peacock
A Newman    C Peacock
O Naylor    J Pullinger
E Noble    W C Pembel
F A W North    P Phillips
C A North    A Parker jun.
G H North    A Parker sen.
P Ottley    S V Pearce
C Owers    S E M Pierce
R Oxbrow    W H M Pattisson
J B Purl    J H Pattisson
H Purl    B Pinkham
A Parker    F R Perkins
W Pavelin    W J Perkins

Witham Muster Roll, page 7, typed
R Pattern    A Rudkin
J M Pelly    F Rudkin
D E Pelly    W Russell
E G Pelly    J E Russell
A Pyke    M Russell
F Prentice    J Reid
G Rudkin    G Ringe
C Reed    W Ringe
F Rice    E Rayment
S Rice    J Razy
W Rice    G Ritson
W E Raven    T Rumsey
J H Rawling    J Sorrell
W Rushen    F Shuttleworth
E Rushen    F G Smith
A Rushen    V J Smith
Albert Rushen    A G Smith
C F Rushen    G S Smith
C Richards    C L Smith
H W Richards    L E W Smith
R Richardson    S Smith

Witham Muster Roll, page 8, typed
H Smith    W Stoneham
E A Smith    B Stoneham
S T Smith    W Stringer
J Smith    G Saunders
W J Smith    J Sillett
S L Smith    H Sillett
R Smith    A C Seaborn
A Shelly    W Saville
G Shelly    B Sneezum
P B Shelly    P Sneezum
L Shelly    J Stiff
A Stoneham    G A Stock  P.W.
J Stoneham    F Stock
W Stevens    J Sutherland
S Springett    S Shillitoe
H Sainty    F Stubbings
E W Sainty    H Stubbings
S Sayer    L Shrempton
F Stoneham    E M Talbot
E Stoneham    J Tayler
H Stoneham   P.W.    A J Tayler
E Shelley   P.W.    E W Thompson  P.W.

Witham Muster Roll, page 9, typed
R E Thompson   P.W.    C Webb
G Thompson   P.W.    E Webb
A Thorogood    F Wager
H Thorogood    E Wager
S W Tyrall    W Wright
A Turner    R W Wakelin
F H Threadkill    F Walkinson
R Varden    F C Whiting
T White    J Yeadon
G Warren
F Wilky
R Woodward
W Woodward
C Whybrow
A Watchman
A J Watchman
A Wallace
F Wilshire
F G Wood
E A Wood
H J Wood
H Wood


The author of the first poem, William E Henley, was very well-known in late Victorian times.

The last poem, by Beatrix Brice Miller, was first published in the Times in 1916 and became very popular. During the War she had been a nursing helper in France.